oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Gidlöf, Andreas C.
    et al.
    Ocaya, Pauline
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Olofsson, Peder S.
    Törmä, Hans
    Sirsjö, Allan
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Differences in retinol metabolism and proliferative response between neointimal and medial smooth muscle cells2006In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 392-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vascular disease is multifactorial and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) play a key role. Retinoids have been shown to influence many disease-promoting processes including proliferation and differentiation in the vessel wall. Phenotypic heterogeneity of vascular SMCs is a well-known phenomenon and phenotypic modulation of SMCs precedes intimal hyperplasia. The SMCs that constitute the intimal hyperplasia demonstrate a distinct phenotype and differ in gene expression compared to medial SMCs. Cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-I), involved in retinoid metabolism, is highly expressed in intimal SMCs, indicating altered retinoid metabolism in this subset of cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolism of all-trans ROH (atROH), the circulating prohormone to active retinoids, in vascular SMCs of different phenotypes. The results show an increased uptake of atROH in intimal SMCs compared to medial SMCs as well as increased expression of the retinoid-metabolizing enzymes retinol dehydrogenase-5 and retinal dehydrogenase-1 and, in conjunction with this gene expression, increased production of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). Furthermore, the retinoic acid-catabolizing enzyme CYP26A1 is expressed at higher levels in medial SMCs compared to intimal SMCs. Thus, both retinoid activation and deactivation processes are in operation. To analyze if the difference in ROH metabolism was also correlated to differences in the biological response to retinol, the effects of ROH on proliferation of SMCs with this phenotypic heterogeneity were studied. We found that intimal SMCs showed a dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition when treated with atROH in contrast to medial SMCs, in which atROH had a mitogenic effect. This study shows, for the first time, that (1) vascular SMCs are able to synthesize biologically active atRA from the prohormone atROH, (2) intimal SMCs have a higher capacity to internalize atROH and metabolize atROH into atRA compared to medial SMCs and (3) atROH inhibits growth of intimal SMCs, but induces medial SMC growth.

  • 2.
    Jatta, Ken
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Norgren, Lars
    Stenberg, Björn
    Sirsjö, Allan
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and chemokine expression in human carotid lesions2005In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 266-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The release of cytokines and chemokines from activated immune-competent cells plays a crucial role in determining the pathology of the atherogenic progress. We investigated the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on cytokine/chemokine expression in carotid lesions and normal renal arteries. The lesions or renal arteries were incubated for 6 h at 37 degrees C in serum-free media treated with or without LPS. After LPS treatment, increased protein levels of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha and MCP-1 were observed in the culture medium from the lesions measured with cytometric bead array. We were able to detect the induction of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha and MCP-1 mRNA in the lesions after stimulation with LPS using real-time PCR. In renal arteries, LPS also induces mRNA expression of all chemokines and cytokines investigated with the exception of IL-6. However, LPS induces significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-10 mRNA in lesions compared to renal arteries. The results suggest that infectious agents are capable of enhancing the production of cytokines/chemokines in an already ongoing inflammatory process such as in atherosclerosis, and that low levels of circulating LPS may affect the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines much more in atherosclerotic vessels than in normal vessels and may contribute to the development of the atherosclerotic lesion.

  • 3.
    Ocaya, Pauline Ajok
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Elmabsout, Ali Ateia
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Olofsson, Peder Stefan
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Törmä, Hans
    Dept Med Sci Dermatol, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gidlöf, Andreas Carl
    Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sirsjö, Allan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    CYP26B1 plays a major role in the regulation of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism and signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells2011In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP26 family are involved in the catabolism of the biologically active retinoid all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA). Since it is possible that an increased local CYP26 activity would reduce the effects of retinoids in vascular injury, we investigated the role of CYP26 in the regulation of atRA levels in human aortic smooth muscle cells (AOSMCs).

    Methods: The expression of CYP26 was investigated in cultured AOSMCs using real-time PCR. The metabolism of atRA was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the inhibitor R115866 or small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to suppress CYP26 activity/expression.

    Results: AOSMCs expressed CYP26B1 constitutively and atRA exposure augmented CYP26B1 mRNA levels. Silencing of the CYP26B1 gene expression or reduction of CYP26B1 enzymatic activity by using siRNA or the inhibitor R115866, respectively, increased atRA-mediated signaling and resulted in decreased cell proliferation. The CYP26 inhibitor also induced expression of atRA-responsive genes. Therefore, atRA-induced CYP26 expression accelerated atRA inactivation in AOSMCs, giving rise to an atRA-CYP26 feedback loop. Inhibition of this loop with a CYP26 inhibitor increased retinoid signaling.

    Conclusion: The results suggest that CYP26 inhibitors may be a therapeutic alternative to exogenous retinoid administration. Copyright (C) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 4.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Jatta, Ken
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Ocaya, Pauline
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Dimberg, Jan
    Sirsjö, Allan
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Expression of IL-1β, IL-1 receptor type I and IL-1 receptor antagonist in human aortic smooth muscle cells: effects of all-trans-retinoic acid2006In: Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172, E-ISSN 1423-0135, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 377-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β and the IL-1 receptor antagonist are expressed by atherosclerotic plaques and may be linked to the development of atherosclerosis. Existing evidence shows that retinoids and their receptors are involved in inflammatory response and that they are found in atherosclerotic plaques. In all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA)-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells (AOSMC), significant increases in IL-1β levels were observed, compared with untreated cells. Examination of IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-1 receptor type I levels did not show any difference between atRA-treated and -untreated AOSMC. The results show that atRA-treated AOSMC express both the precursor (33 kDa) and the active form (17 kDa) of the IL-1β protein. atRA-treated carotid lesions showed significantly elevated IL-1β mRNA levels (2.9 ± 2.33) compared with untreated lesions (2.0 ± 1.77; p < 0.05). These results support the role of atRA as a regulator of inflammation such as in atherosclerosis.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf