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  • 1.
    Blomqvist, J.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    South, E.
    Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tiukova, L.
    Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Momeni, M. H.
    Department of Molecular Biology, Uppsala Biocenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hansson, H.
    Department of Molecular Biology, Uppsala Biocenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ståhlberg, J.
    Department of Molecular Biology, Uppsala Biocenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Horn, S. J.
    Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Passoth, V.
    Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate by the alternative industrial ethanol yeast Dekkera bruxellensis2011In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, ISSN 0266-8254, E-ISSN 1472-765X, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 73-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Testing the ability of the alternative ethanol production yeast Dekkera bruxellensis to produce ethanol from lignocellulose hydrolysate and comparing it to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Methods and Results: Industrial isolates of D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae were cultivated in small-scale batch fermentations of enzymatically hydrolysed steam exploded aspen sawdust. Different dilutions of hydrolysate were tested. None of the yeasts grew in undiluted or 1 : 2 diluted hydrolysate [final glucose concentration always adjusted to 40 g l(-1) (0.22 mol l(-1))]. This was most likely due to the presence of inhibitors such as acetate or furfural. In 1 : 5 hydrolysate, S. cerevisiae grew, but not D. bruxellensis, and in 1 : 10 hydrolysate, both yeasts grew. An external vitamin source (e.g. yeast extract) was essential for growth of D. bruxellensis in this lignocellulosic hydrolysate and strongly stimulated S. cerevisiae growth and ethanol production. Ethanol yields of 0 42 +/- 0 01 g ethanol (g glucose)(-1) were observed for both yeasts in 1 : 10 hydrolysate. In small-scale continuous cultures with cell recirculation, with a gradual increase in the hydrolysate concentration, D. bruxellensis was able to grow in 1 : 5 hydrolysate. In bioreactor experiments with cell recirculation, hydrolysate contents were increased up to 1 : 2 hydrolysate, without significant losses in ethanol yields for both yeasts and only slight differences in viable cell counts, indicating an ability of both yeasts to adapt to toxic compounds in the hydrolysate.

    Conclusions: Dekkera bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae have a similar potential to ferment lignocellulose hydrolysate to ethanol and to adapt to fermentation inhibitors in the hydrolysate.

    Significance and Impact of the study: This is the first study investigating the potential of D. bruxellensis to ferment lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Its high competitiveness in industrial fermentations makes D. bruxellensis an interesting alternative for ethanol production from those substrates.

  • 2.
    Loncarevic, Semir
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lennart
    Swedish Laboratory Service, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Ringnér, Åke
    Communicable Diseases Control Unit, Kalmar County Council, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Runehagen, Arne
    Communicable Diseases Control Unit, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A case of foodborne listeriosis in Sweden1997In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, ISSN 0266-8254, E-ISSN 1472-765X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 65-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 70-year-old woman fell seriously ill overnight with meningitis and was admitted to hospital. Cerebrospinal fluid culture yielded Listeria monocytogenes. One of the first problems in solving a human case of listeriosis suspected to be foodborne is to find the foods likely to have been transmitting L. monocytogenes. Two enrichment procedures and a direct plating procedure were used for isolation of the bacteria from different food items collected from the patient's refrigerator, local retail store and producer. Samples of vacuum-packed products of sliced pork brawn, sliced cooked medwurst and berliner wurst of the same brand harboured L. monocytogenes. Serotyping and restriction enzyme analysis (REA) with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to characterize and compare 41 isolates, including the human strain. At least three clones were present in the foods investigated, and one of these was identical to the human clone. This clone was present in samples of medwurst from the patient's refrigerator and the local retail store. This is, to our knowledge, the first proven foodborne case of listeriosis reported in Sweden.

  • 3.
    Loncarevic, Semir
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The clones of Listeria monocytogenes detected in food depend on the method used1996In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, ISSN 0266-8254, E-ISSN 1472-765X, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 381-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restriction enzyme analysis (REA) with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) has been used to characterize and compare Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from foods by two methods, an enrichment procedure and a direct plating procedure. In total 151 isolates from nine foods were investigated, In six of the foods (101 strains investigated) only one clone of L, monocytogenes was found irrespective of the method used. In three foods (50 strains investigated) the direct plating procedure yielded more clones than the enrichment procedure. At the most, five clones were detected in the same food. The results presented here indicate that direct plating from the food reveals more L, monocytogenes clones than revealed by an enrichment procedure.

  • 4.
    Nilsson, Anders
    et al.
    National Food Administration, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala .
    Lambertz, Susanne
    National Food Administration, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Stålhandske, Per
    Department of Food Hygiene, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Norberg, Per
    National Food Administration, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in food by PCR amplification1998In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, ISSN 0266-8254, E-ISSN 1472-765X, Vol. 26, p. 140-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection ofpathogenic, virulent strains of Yersinia enterocolitica. By using both virulence loci virFand ail as markers for pathogenicity, detection of species with a virulence factor present waspossible. DNA preparation in the presence of hexadecyl trimethy ammonium bromide(CTAB) was followed by two 44 cycle amplification reactions, one for each of themarkers. As few as 102Y. enterocolitica cells were detected in ground pork in thepresence of 105–106bacteria of other species. The described PCR assay providesa sensitive robust assay for the detection of virulent Y. enterocolitica in food.

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