oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Carvalho Lamy, Zeni
    Departamento de Saúde Pública, Universidade Federal do Maranhâo, Hospital Universitário, Sao Luis, Brazil.
    Tingvall, Maria
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Parental experiences of providing skin-to-skin care to their newborn infant: Part 2: A qualitative meta-synthesis2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, article id 24907Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To synthesize and interpret qualitative research findings focusing on parental experiences of skin-to-skin care (SSC) for newborn infants.

    Background: SSC induces many benefits for newborn infants and their parents. Three meta-analyses have been conducted on physiological outcomes, but no previous qualitative meta-synthesis on parental experiences of SSC has been identified.

    Design: The present meta-synthesis was guided by the methodology described by Paterson and co-workers.

    Data sources: Four databases were searched, without year or language limitations, up until December 2013. Manual searches were also performed. The searches and subsequent quality appraisal resulted in the inclusion of 29 original qualitative papers from 9 countries, reporting experiences from 401 mothers and 94 fathers.

    Review methods: The meta-synthesis entails a meta-data analysis, analysis of meta-method, and meta-theory in the included primary studies. Based on the three analyses, the meta-synthesis represents a new interpretation of a phenomenon. The results of the meta-data analysis have been presented as a qualitative systematic review in a separate paper.

    Results: When synthesizing and interpreting the findings from the included analyses, a theoretical model of Becoming a parent under unfamiliar circumstances emerged. Providing SSC seems to be a restorative as well as an energy-draining experience. A supportive environment has been described as facilitating the restorative experience, whereas obstacles in the environment seem to make the provision of SSC energy-draining for parents. When the process is experienced as positive, it facilitates the growth of parental self-esteem and makes the parents ready to assume full responsibility for their child.

    Conclusion: The results show that SSC can be interpreted not only as a family-including and important health care intervention but also in terms of actually becoming a parent. The process of becoming a parent in this specific situation is influenced by external factors in three different levels; family and friends, community, and society at large. The descriptions of providing SSC are similar to what has previously been described as the natural process of becoming a mother or a father.

  • 2.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Carvalho Lamy, Zeny
    Departamento de Saúde Pública, Universidade Federal do Maranhâo, Hospital Universitário, Sao Luis MA, Brazil.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Parental experiences of providing skin-to-skin care to their newborn infant: Part 1: A qualitative systematic review2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, article id 24906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe parental experiences of providing skin-to-skin care (SSC) to their newborn infants.

    Background: SSC care for newborn infants has been reported to have positive physiological and psychological benefits to the infants and their parents. No systematic review regarding parental experiences has been identified.

    Design: In this first part of a meta-study, the findings of a systematic literature review on parental experience of SSC care are presented.

    Data sources: Four databases were searched, without year or language limitations, up until December 2013. Manual searches were performed in reference lists and in a bibliography of the topic.

    Review methods: After a quality-appraisal process, data from the original articles were extracted and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The systematic and manual searches led to the inclusion of 29 original qualitative papers from nine countries, reporting experiences from 401 mothers and 94 fathers. Two themes that characterized the provision of SSC emerged: a restoring experience and an energy-draining experience.

    Conclusion: This review has added scientific and systematic knowledge about parental experiences of providing SSC. Further research about fathers’ experiences is recommended.

  • 3.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundholm, Ulla Persson
    Nora Health Care Centre, Örebro County Council, Nora, Sweden.
    Kohn, Monica
    Nora Health Care Centre, Örebro County Council, Nora, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Medical yoga: another way of being in the world-A phenomenological study from the perspective of persons suffering from stress-related symptoms2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, article id 23033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of stress-related illness has grown in recent years. Many of these patients seek help in primary health care. Yoga can reduce stress and thus complements pharmacological therapy in medical practice. To our knowledge, no studies have investigated patients' experiences of yoga treatment in a primary health care setting or, specifically, the experiences of yoga when suffering from stress-related illness. Thus, the aim of the present study was to explore the meaning of participating in medical yoga as a complementary treatment for stress-related symptoms and diagnosis in a primary health care setting. This study has a descriptive phenomenological design and took place at a primary health care centre in Sweden during 2011. Five women and one man (43-51 years) participated. They were recruited from the intervention group (n = 18) in a randomized control trial, in which they had participated in a medical yoga group in addition to standard care for 12 weeks. Data were collected by means of qualitative interviews, and a phenomenological data analysis was conducted. The essential meaning of the medical yoga experience was that the medical yoga was not an endpoint of recovery but the start of a process towards an increased sense of wholeness. It was described as a way of alleviating suffering, and it provided the participants with a tool for dealing with their stress and current situation on a practical level. It led to greater self-awareness and self-esteem, which in turn had an implicit impact on their lifeworld. In phenomenological terms, this can be summarized as Another way of being in the world, encompassing a perception of deepened identity. From a philosophical perspective, due to using the body in a new way (yoga), the participants had learnt to see things differently, which enriched and recast their perception of themselves and their lives.

  • 4.
    Carlander, Ida
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Research and Development Unit, Stockholm Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Four aspects of self-image close to death at home2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 5931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living close to death means an inevitable confrontation with one’s own existential limitation. In this article, we argue that everyday life close to death embodies an identity work in progress. We used a narrative approach and a holistic-content reading to analyze 12 interviews conducted with three persons close to death. By illuminating the unique stories and identifying patterns among the participants’ narratives, we found four themes exemplifying important aspects of the identity work related to everyday life close to death. Two of the themes, named ‘‘Inside and outside of me’’ and ‘‘Searching for togetherness,’’ represented the core of the self-image and were framed by the other themes, ‘‘My place in space’’ and ‘‘My death and my time.’’ Our findings elucidate the way the individual stories moved between the past, the present, and the future. This study challenges the idea that everyday life close to impending death primarily means limitations. The findings show that the search for meaning, new knowledge, and community can form a part of a conscious and ongoing identity work close to death.

  • 5.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Department of Health and Nursing, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Centre for Person-Centered Care (GPCC), Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sparud Lundin, Carina
    Centre for Person-Centered Care (GPCC), Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reprioritizing life: A conceptual model of how women with type 1 diabetes deal with main concerns in early motherhood2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no Sup. 2, article id 1394147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Becoming a mother is related to increased demands for women with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and more research is needed to identify their needs for support in everyday living. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the main concerns in daily life in early motherhood for women with type 1 diabetes and how they deal with these concerns.

    Method: A grounded theory study was conducted in which 14 women with type 1 diabetes were interviewed individually 7 to 17 months after childbirth.

    Results: A conceptual model was identified with the core category “reprioritizing life”, and three related categories: adjusting to motherhood, taking command of the diabetes, and seeking like-minded women. Becoming a mother was a turning point towards a greater awareness and acceptance of prioritizing diabetes management and health, and thus, life. There was a gap in provision of diabetes care after birth and during the time of early motherhood compared with during pregnancy.

    Conclusions: Healthcare contacts already planned before delivery can promote person-centred care during the whole period from pregnancy to motherhood. Moreover, providing alternative sources for health information and peer support could improve the life situation during early motherhood.

  • 6.
    Duberg, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Healthcare Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Healthcare Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sunvisson, Helena
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    "I feel free": Experiences of a dance intervention for adolescent girls with internalizing problems2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent girls today suffer from internalizing problems such as somatic symptoms and mental health problems at higher rates compared to those of previous decades, and effective interventions are warranted. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of participating in an 8-month dance intervention. This qualitative study was embedded in a randomized controlled trial of a dance intervention for adolescent girls with internalizing problems. A total of 112 girls aged 13-18 were included in the study. The dance intervention group comprised 59 girls, 24 of whom were strategically chosen to be interviewed. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. The experiences of the dance intervention resulted in five generic categories: (1) An Oasis from Stress, which represents the fundamental basis of the intervention; (2) Supportive Togetherness, the setting; (3) Enjoyment and Empowerment, the immediate effect; (4) Finding Acceptance and Trust in Own Ability, the outcome; and (5) Dance as Emotional Expression, the use of the intervention. One main category emerged, Finding Embodied Self-Trust That Opens New Doors, which emphasizes the increased trust in the self and the ability to approach life with a sense of freedom and openness. The central understanding of the adolescent girls' experiences was that the dance intervention enriched and gave access to personal resources. With the non-judgmental atmosphere and supportive togetherness as a safe platform, the enjoyment and empowerment in dancing gave rise to acceptance, trust in ability, and emotional expression. Taken together, this increased self-trust and they discovered a new ability to "claim space." Findings from this study may provide practical information on designing future interventions for adolescent girls with internalizing problems.

  • 7.
    Ehn, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological research centre, University hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological research centre, University hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wahlqvist, Moa
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological research centre, University hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish National Resource Centre for Deafblindness, Lund, Sweden .
    Life strategies of people with deafblindness due to Usher syndrome type 2a-a qualitative study2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1656790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore life strategies in people with Usher syndrome type 2a.

    Background: There are no studies on life strategies in people with Usher syndrome. People with deafblindness are often described in terms of poor health and low quality of life, or as being vulnerable. From a clinical point of view, it is of importance to balance this picture, with an increased knowledge of life strategies.

    Methods: The study had a qualitative explorative design. Fourteen people aged 20-64 years (4 women, 10 men) with USH2a in Sweden participated in focus group interviews, which were transcribed and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The content analysis resulted in seven categories; remaining active, using devices, using support, sharing knowledge, appreciating the present, maintaining a positive image and alleviating emotional pain. Two sub-themes: resolve or prevent challenges and comforting oneself was abstracted forming a theme "being at the helm".

    Conclusion: The findings show that people with USH2a have a variety of life strategies that can be interpreted as highlighting different aspects of psychological flexibility in a life adjustment process. The study demonstrates that people with USH2a manage in many ways, and metaphorically, by "taking the helm", they strive to actively navigate towards their own chosen values.

  • 8.
    Fägerstad, Anida
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Jesper
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.
    Carlsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center.
    Barriers and facilitators for adolescent girls to take on adult responsibility for dental care: a qualitative study2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1678971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to explore and describe experiences of the dental care system among adolescent dental patients with a recent history of missed dental appointments at public dental clinics (PDCs) in a Swedish county.

    Methods: Twelve adolescent girls participated in the study. Data were collected by individual, semi-structured, open-ended interviews and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The study findings could be summed into the theme ?Triggers for adolescent girls to take on or not take on adult responsibility for dental care?. The experience of free dental care could be summarized in five main categories: Pain and discomfort; Attractive and healthy teeth; Feeling safe and secure; Taking on the responsibility; and Free of charge. These five categories consisted of 15 subcategories.

    Conclusions: The results of this study should increase the knowledge on how to meet and treat adolescent girls in dental care. Knowing what will happen during the dental visit was highlighted by the participants as decisive to whether or not they would attend their dental appointments. Therefore, we should as far as possible ensure that our patients feel safe at their dental visits and by trying to avoid painful treatments.

  • 9.
    Haman, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Orthorexia nervosa: An integrative literature review of a lifestyle syndrome2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 26799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bratman first proposed orthorexia nervosa in the late 1990s, defining it an obsession with eating healthy food to achieve, for instance, improved health. Today, in the Swedish media, excessive exercising plays a central role in relation to orthorexia. A few review articles on orthorexia have been conducted; however, these have not focused on aspects of food and eating, sport, exercise, or a societal perspective. The overall aim of this study was to provide an overview and synthesis of what philosophies of science approaches form the current academic framework of orthorexia. Key questions were: What aspects of food and eating are related to orthorexia? What role do exercise and sports play in relation to orthorexia? In what ways are orthorexia contextualized? Consequently, the concept of healthism was used to discuss and contextualize orthorexia. The method used was an integrative literature review; the material covered 19 empirical and theoretical articles published in peer-reviewed journals. This review demonstrates a multifaceted nature of orthorexia research; this field has been examined from four different philosophies of science approaches (i.e., empirical-atomistic, empirical-atomistic with elements of empirical-holistic, empirical-holistic, and rational-holistic) on individual, social, and societal levels. The majority of the articles followed an empirical-atomistic approach that focused on orthorexia as an individual issue, which was discussed using healthism. Our analysis indicates a need for (a) more empirical-holistic research that applies interpretive qualitative methods and uses a social perspective of health, e.g., healthism and (b) examining the role of sports and exercise in relation to orthorexia that takes the problematizing of "orthorexic behaviours" within the sports context into account.

  • 10.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Bernt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. South African Chair for Education and Development, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa; Centre for Adult and Continuing Education, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Emotional knowing in nursing practice: in the encounter between life and death2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 5367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients, next of kin and nurses in surgical wards often raise existential questions in the encounter between life and death. Nurses' emotional knowing at this encounter is crucial. Consequently, this study's purpose was to analyse and describe nurses' emotional knowing to reveal (a) how this knowing is expressed in daily work and (b) what emotions, thoughts and actions this knowing includes. This study used combined ethnographic and hermeneutic methodologies. Data were collected using participant observations, informal conversations and interviews. We found that nurses' emotional knowing could be interpreted in relation to various rooms of emotions, thoughts and actions. Nurses' judgements formed these rooms. They strived to do things correctly in the normative room; created a safe, secure milieu for patients and next of kin in the safety–security room; and questioned their actions in the critical room. They created affinity for co-operation that benefitted encounters with patients in their affinity room. And they demonstrated sensitivity and compassion to patients and next of kin; sensitivity and compassion were particularly evident in the closeness room. In our main interpretation, we found that nurses' judgements in various rooms (emotional knowing) constitute an expression of practical wisdom (phronesis) in nursing practice.

  • 11.
    Källstrand Eriksson, Jeanette
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Sweden, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Catherine
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Sweden, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Buer, Nina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Thulesius, Hans
    FoU Kronoberg, Växjö, Sweden.
    Seniors' self-preservation by maintaining established self and defying deterioration: A grounded theroy2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this classic grounded theory study was to understand how seniors who are living independently resolve issues influenced by visual impairment and high fall risk. We interviewed and observed 13 seniors with visual impairment in their homes. We also interviewed six visual instructors with experience from many hundreds of relevant incidents from the same group of seniors. We found that the seniors are resolving their main concern of ‘‘remaining themselves as who they used to be’’ by self-preservation. Within this category, the strategies maintaining the established self and defying deterioration emerged as the most prominent in our data. The theme maintaining the established self is mostly guided by change inertia and includes living the past (retaining past activities, reminiscing, and keeping the home intact) and facading (hiding impairment, leading to avoidance of becoming a burden and to risk juggling). Defying deterioration is a proactive scheme and involves moving (by exercising, adapting activities, using walking aids, driving), adapting (by finding new ways), and networking by sustaining old support networks or finding new networks. Self-preservation is generic human behavior and modifying this theory to other fields may therefore be worthwhile. In addition, health care providers may have use for the theory in fall preventive planning.

  • 12.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Balancing performance-based expectations with a holistic perspective on coaching: a qualitative study of Swedish women's national football team coaches' practice experiences2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1358580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how an exclusive sample of women's national football team coaches described how they implement careful coaching while facing social and organizational pressure to win medals.

    Method: To consider coaches' negotiations, we drew on Noddings' concept of caring. Using an interpretive research paradigm, we conducted in-depth interviews with five Swedish women's national football team coaches. An abductive approach was used to simultaneously process the theoretical framework of "ethics of care" and the empirical data.

    Results: The coaches unanimously adopted a holistic perspective to coaching. The coaching strategies they described included promoting players' development, well-being, and sustainable elite performance; listening to the players' voices and engaging in dialogue; and creating a positive environment and promoting fair play.

    Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that the women coaches, despite performance pressure, adopt caring coaching in the form of Noddings' pedagogical modelling, dialogue, and confirmation strategies, and provide an example of how coaches can adopt caring, holistic, and athlete-centred coaching while working at the highest level of competitive sport and achieving competitive success.

  • 13.
    Lööf, Helena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Elisabet Welin
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Rheumatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Staffan
    Department of Learning Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bullington, Jennifer
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Body awareness in persons diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 24670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) poses physiological and psychological demands on a person. RA is a autoimmune disease that can cause pain, disability, and suffering. The ability to notice bodily inner sensations and stimuli (body awareness, BA) is described in the literature in ways that could have either a positive or a negative impact on a person's health. The concept of BA is complex and a thorough understanding is needed about what BA means from the patient's perspective. This study was therefore conducted to acquire greater insight into this phenomenon. The study is grounded in a phenomenological life-world perspective. Eighteen narrative interviews were conducted in patients (age range 23-78 years) with RA. The interviews were analyzed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. General characteristics were found running through all 18 interviews, indicating that the disease resulted in a higher degree of negatively toned BA. BA was either a reactive process of searching or controlling after disease-related symptoms or a reactive process triggered by emotions. BA was an active process of taking an inventory of abilities. All participants had the ability to shift focus from BA to the outside world. Four typologies were identified: "A reactive process on symptoms," "A reactive process on emotional triggers," "An active process of taking an inventory of abilities," and "A shifting from BA to the outside world." In conclusion, because BA can be both positively and negatively toned, health care professionals must have a good understanding of when BA is positive and when it is negative in relation to the patient. RA had caused a higher degree of negatively toned BA. Thus, the ability to shift attention from BA to activity in the outside world could sometimes be beneficial for the patient's general health.

  • 14.
    Norell, Margaretha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Dealing with daily emotions: supportive activities for the elderly in a municipal care setting2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, article id 9510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are diverse descriptions of supportive activities in nursing to be found in the literature. What they have in common is their association with good care outcomes, but they may differ depending on the context in which the care is given. In a Swedish municipal elderly care setting, registered nurses (RNs) work in a consultative way and they describe a part of their tasks as comprising supportive activities, without specifying what kind of supportive activities they mean. The aim of the study was to explore the main concern of the support given by RNs to a group of patients in an elderly home care setting. The study was conducted using Grounded Theory. Data were collected using nonparticipant observations regarding the supportive activities of 12 RNs at the home of 36 patients between the ages of 80 and 102 years. Most of the home visit lasted about 40 min but some lasted for 90 min. The central category was about dealing with daily emotions. This was done by encouraging the situation and reducing the patient's limitations, but situations also occurred in which there was a gap of support. Support was about capturing the emotions that the patient expressed for a particular moment, but there were also situations in which RNs chose not to give support. To develop a holistic eldercare, more knowledge is needed about the factors causing the RNs to choose not to provide support on some occasions.

  • 15.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Trying to cope with everyday life: emotional support in municipal elderly care setting2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotional support is considered to be important to older patients because it is a contributing factor to experiencing good health and it has been shown that it can prevent depression after a hip fracture. Opinions differ on whether emotional support falls within the field of nursing, and studies also show that nurses in an elderly home care setting fail when it comes to giving emotional support. The aim of this study was to explore reasons for registered nurses to give emotional support to older patients in a municipal home care setting. The study was conducted using Grounded Theory. Data collection was carried out through interviews with 16 registered nurses. The inclusion criteria were emotional support given to patients aged 80 years and above living in ordinary or sheltered housing and who were in need of help from both the home help service and registered nurses. The results show that the main concern of emotional support was "Trying to relieve the patient from their emotions so they are able to cope with everyday life." This core category illustrates how registered nurses tried to support the patients' own strength, so that they were able to move forward. Registered nurses consider that they could support the patients because they give them access to, or could create access to, their emotions, but there were also times when they felt helplessness and as a result, consciously opted out. The results also indicate that registered nurses were keen to give emotional support. To develop patient-centered elderly care, more knowledge of emotional support and the elderly's need for this support is required.

  • 16.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Torrenting values, feelings, and thoughts: cyber nursing and virtual self-care in a breast augmentation forum2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 7378-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research shows that breast augmentation is positively correlated with positive psychological states. The aim of this study was to explore the shared values, feelings, and thoughts within the culture of breast enlargement among women visiting Internet-based forums when considering and/or undergoing esthetic plastic surgery. The study used a netnographic method for gathering and analyzing data. The findings show that the women used the Internet forum to provide emotional support to other women. Through electronic postings, they cared for and nursed each others' anxiety and feelings throughout the whole process. Apart from the process, another central issue was that the women's relationships were frequently discussed; specifically their relationship to themselves, their environment, and with the surgeons. The findings suggest that Internet forums represent a channel through which posters can share values, feelings, and thoughts from the position of an agent of action as well as from a position as the object of action. These dual positions and the medium endow the women with a virtual nursing competence that would otherwise be unavailable. By introducing the concept of torrenting as a means of sharing important self-care information, the authors provide a concept that can be further explored in relation to post modern self-care strategies within contemporary nursing theories and practice.

  • 17.
    Sunvisson, Helena
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stopped within a track:  embodied experiences of late-stage Parkinson's disease2006In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a phenomenological understanding of humans as situated and intentional beings, this study explored experience of late-stage Parkinson's disease. A woman aged 72, in the late stages of Parkinson's disease, was interviewed regarding her experiences over a five-year period. A phenomenological method was used for scrutinizing tape-recorded and verbatim transcribed interviews. Results reveal that late-stage Parkinson's disease is manifested as a sense of lost control over daily life and as a life with unpredictable bodily reactions. There was a demand to live within an increasingly rigid, slow rhythm of time, with continuously decreased embodied skilfulness, which caused fragmented mobility patterns. Movements were no longer intentional, i.e. outward; they demanded inward concentration. The intention to move was no longer primary, e.g. to grab a handle, because space is mentally and physically understood. Instead, intention was secondary because movement became primary. This phenomenon changed embodied understanding of relationships with the room, distances, and things. Understanding of distance, e.g. became unclear, and this affected ways in which place and situation were experienced and lived. The results highlight ways that a Parkinson's sufferer lives and experiences space and time in surroundings and situations; and how the person meets and deals with significant challenges.

  • 18.
    Tollén, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Kamwendo, Kitty
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Changes in everyday life after discharge from day care rehabilitation2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 5753-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community-based day care that provides rehabilitation (DCR) targets elderly people with physical disabilities. The goal of these programmes is mainly to improve physical ability in order to enable participants to remain in their ordinary homes. Knowledge of the outcomes of DCR is limited as well as knowledge of what it is that makes a difference for the individual. The aim of this study was to describe what changes in everyday life elderly persons experienced after discharge from a community-based day care rehabilitation centre and to give possible explanations for these changes. Fifteen elderly people were interviewed after that they had been discharged from DCR. A narrative approach was used for analysing the interview data. Four case stories constitute the findings, each of them with unique descriptions of changes in everyday life as well as possible explanations for these changes. The first case story described resumption of daily activities that made the days more eventful and meaningful. The second described how everyday life became an arena for exercising, which create confidence for the future. The third described how an increased sense of certainty and security in the movements led to an increased appetite for life. Finally, the fourth case story described both the stay at the DCR centre and the promise of a new period there as uplifting that made the days easier. Concerning possible explanations for these changes, the findings indicate that it was a combination of several events that together contributed to the changes. Examples were physical training, counselling about how to live in an active and healthy lifestyle, and socialisation with other patients in formal as well as in informal sessions.

  • 19.
    Widén, Stephen
    et al.
    Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Trollhättan.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Göteborg.
    Risk perception in musical settings: a qualitative study2007In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study was undertaken in order to investigate young people's perspectives on risk-taking and music experiences in musical settings. The study sample included nine women and seven men of whom eight were musicians and eight were not. Open-ended interviews were performed and analysed by the guidance of Grounded Theory. “Music as a mean in creating identity” was seen as the core category, essential for the understanding of risk-taking behaviour in musical settings. Three higher-order categories, meaningfully related to the core category, emerged in the interviews and they were labelled “self-image”, “risk consideration” and “norms and ideals”. The individual's self-identification as being vulnerable to negative consequences of a particular type of risk behaviour seems to be a central aspect in transforming health-risk behaviour into a health-preventive behaviour. The higher-order category “risk consideration” was built up by concepts as “risk awareness” and “meaning of risk-taking”. Finally, “norms and ideals” consisted of two categories: “acting in accordance with social norms”, and “acting in accordance with normative ideals”. If people believe that exposure to loud music without wearing hearing protection is an acceptable norm, regardless of the accuracy of this perception, they are more likely to become involved in risk-taking behaviour regarding their hearing. We believe that risk consideration, social norms and ideals are meaningful concepts for the understanding of risk-taking behaviour in young people.

  • 20.
    Zakrisson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Healthcare Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Symptom-reducing actions: a concept analysis in the context of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1387452Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have multiple symptoms. Nursing care is based on six core competencies and one of them is person-centred care that includes the aspect of professional symptom relief. The aim was to clarify a meaning of the concept of Symptom-reducing actions in the context of COPD. Databases MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched between 1982 and February 2016 and 26 publications were found. Two dictionaries and three books were investigated. The method of Walker & Avant was followed. The use of the concept of Symptom-reducing actions may be categorized by the sub-concepts of supervision, information, and patient education. Exploration of defining attributes was symptom management, instructions, support, motivation, explanation, advice, teaching, and learning. Antecedent occurrences were related to factors that affect the patient's level of function such as physical performance and cognitive function. Symptom-reducing actions offer a way to support patients with COPD in self-management. Symptom-reducing actions can mediate facts in a purposeful process performed by the nurse to enable the patient to take control over and manage unpleasant symptoms by a person-centred, planned process. The nurse can achieve this via supervision, information, and patient education with an integrated emotional component. Evaluating the outcomes is needed.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf