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  • 1.
    Colins, Olivier F.
    et al.
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands; Center for Criminological and Psychosocial Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fanti, Kostas A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Salekin, Randall T.
    Department of Psychology and Disruptive Behavior Clinic, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, United States.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Psychopathic Personality in the General Population: Differences and Similarities Across Gender2017In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579X, E-ISSN 1943-2763, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 49-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to identify distinct subgroups of adults in a general population sample (N = 2,500; 52.6% females) based on their scores on three psychopathy dimensions. Using latent profile analysis, five groups were identified among males and females separately, including a psychopathic personality group. Multivariate analyses of variance showed that this latter group had higher levels of aggression, offending, substance use, attention-deficit/hyperactivity symptoms, internalizing problems, and maltreatment than most of the other groups. Associated features of males and females with a psychopathic personality were very similar; however, salient gender differences did emerge. Specifically, females with a psychopathic personality were more frequently exposed to sexual abuse, expressed more emotional difficulties, and engaged in higher levels of relational aggression. In conclusion, person-oriented analyses identified adults with a personality that looks like psychopathy, and furthered our understanding of gender similarities and differences in these adults.

  • 2.
    Drislane, Laura E.
    et al.
    Florida State Univ, Tallahassee, USA.
    Brislin, Sarah J.
    Florida State Univ, Tallahassee, USA.
    Kendler, Kenneth S.
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Richmond, USA.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patrick, Christopher J.
    Florida State Univ, Tallahassee, USA.
    A triarchic model analysis of the youth psychopathic traits inventory2015In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579X, E-ISSN 1943-2763, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 15-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Triarchic model of psychopathy characterizes this complex condition in terms of distinct phenotypic constructs of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition. The current study evaluated the coverage of these constructs provided by a well-established inventory for assessing psychopathy in adolescents, the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI). A consensus rating approach was used to identify YPI items relevant to each Triarchic model construct, and convergent and discriminant validity of the resulting YPI-Triarchic scales were examined in relation to criterion measures consisting of scores on other psychopathy measures and relevant personality trait variables (N = 618, M age = 18.8). The YPI-Triarchic scales showed good internal consistency and exhibited properties largely consistent with predictions based on the Triarchic model, aside from somewhat greater than expected covariance between boldness and other facet scales. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for interpreting scores on the YPI and for investigating distinctive components of psychopathy in youth.

  • 3.
    Zwaanswijk, Wendy
    et al.
    Child and Education Studies, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    van Geel, Mitch
    Child and Education Studies, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fanti, Kostas A
    Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Vedder, Paul
    Child and Education Studies, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    Variants of Psychopathy and the Dependence on Gender, Age, and Ethnic Background2018In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579X, E-ISSN 1943-2763, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 721-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study examines variants of psychopathy in a community sample of Dutch adolescents (N = 2,855, 57% male) using three dimensions of psychopathy and trait anxiety. Five subgroups were identified, two with high levels of psychopathic traits. The first seemed consistent with primary psychopathy, high on all dimensions, with additional low levels of anxiety, whereas the second showed elevated levels of anxiety, consistent with secondary psychopathy. Two variants low on psychopathic traits were identified: a low-risk variant and an anxious variant. Further, a moderate-risk group was found, with slightly above average psychopathy traits and average levels of mental health problems. The secondary psychopathy and the anxious variant reported the most problem behaviors. Boys, younger adolescents, and non-Western immigrant youth were overrepresented in the secondary group. These findings show that in a community sample psychopathy is a heterogeneous phenomenon.

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