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  • 1.
    Liu, Wei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wu, Yuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Chang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Li, Hong C
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Liao, Chun Y
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research for Sustainable Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, China .
    Cui, Lin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Zhou, Qun F
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Yan, Bing
    School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, China; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, United States .
    Jiang, Gui B
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Impact of silver nanoparticles on human cells: effect of particle size2010In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 319-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work investigated the cytotoxicities of three silver nanoparticles (SNPs) SNP-5, SNP-20 and SNP-50 with different sizes ( approximately 5 nm, approximately 20 nm and approximately 50 nm) using four human cell models (A549, SGC-7901, HepG2 and MCF-7). Endpoints included cell morphology, cell viability, cellular membrane integrity, oxidative stress and cell cycle progression. Observable deleterious effects on the cell morphologies and membrane integrity were induced by SNP-5 and SNP-20. SNPs elevated the ROS levels in cells and arrested the cells at S phase. Apoptosis occurred for 4-9% of the exposed cells. All these cellular responses as well as EC50 values were found to be size-dependent for the tested SNPs. Ultrastructural observations confirmed the presence of SNPs inside cells. Elemental analysis of silver in cells by ICP-MS showed that smaller nanoparticles enter cells more easily than larger ones, which may be the cause of higher toxic effects. The findings may assist in the design of SNP applications and provide insights into their toxicity.

  • 2.
    Åkerlund, Emma
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Islam, Md Shafiqul
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    McCarrick, Sarah
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alfaro-Moreno, Ernesto
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Inflammation and (secondary) genotoxicity of Ni and NiO nanoparticles2019In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1060-1072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity can arise through different mechanisms, and generally, primary and secondary genotoxicity can be distinguished where the secondary is driven by an inflammatory response. It is, however, yet unclear how a secondary genotoxicity can be detected using in vitro methods. The aim of this study was to investigate inflammation and genotoxicity caused by agglomerated nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles and, furthermore, to explore the possibility to test secondary (inflammation-driven) genotoxicity in vitro. As a benchmark particle to compare with, we used crystalline silica (quartz). A proteome profiler antibody array was used to screen for changes in release of 105 different cytokines and the results showed an increased secretion of various cytokines including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) following exposure of macrophages (differentiated THP-1 cells). Both Ni and NiO caused DNA damage (comet assay) following exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and interestingly conditioned media (CM) from exposed macrophages also resulted in DNA damage (2- and 3-fold increase for Ni and NiO, respectively). Similar results were also found when using a co-culture system of macrophages and epithelial cells. In conclusion, this study shows that it is possible to detect a secondary genotoxicity in lung epithelial cells by using in vitro methods based on conditioned media or co-cultures. Further investigation is needed in order to find out what factors that are causing this secondary genotoxicity and whether such effects are caused by numerous nanoparticles.

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