oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Fagerli, Tove A.
    et al.
    National Center for Fetal Medicine, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetric and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University College of Southeast Norway, Tønsberg, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Kristina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetric and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Åhman, Annika
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetric and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holmlund, Sophia
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetric and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Darje, Elisabeth
    Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Technology and Science and Department of Women’s Health, StOlavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Eggebø, Torbjørn M.
    National Center for Fetal Medicine, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children’s and Women’s Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Midwives’ and obstetricians’ views on appropriate obstetric sonography in Norway2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 1-5Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The primary aim of this study was to investigate midwives' and obstetricians' views on how many ultrasound examinations should be part of standard care during pregnancy in Norway.

    Material and methods: This study is a part of a larger study, the CROss-Country Ultrasound Study (CROCUS), an international investigation of midwives' and obstetricians' experiences of and views on the use of ultrasound. We distributed 400 questionnaires to respondents in all five health regions in Norway: 40 to municipal midwives, 180 to midwives working in hospitals and 180 to obstetricians. The questionnaire included specific questions about the appropriate number of examinations during pregnancy, examinations without medical indication, non-medical ultrasound, commercialisation and safety.

    Results: The response rate was 45%. Of the respondents, 58% reported satisfaction with the offer of one scheduled ultrasound examination during pregnancy, as recommended in the Norwegian guidelines. Health care professionals who used ultrasound themselves were significantly more likely to want to offer more ultrasound examinations: 52% of the ultrasound users wanted to offer two or more ultrasound examinations vs. 16% of the non-users (p < .01). The majority of obstetricians (80%) reported that pregnant women expect to undergo ultrasound examination, even in the absence of medical indication.

    Conclusion: The majority of Norwegian health care professionals participating in this study supported the national recommendation on ultrasound in pregnancy. Ultrasound users wanted to offer more ultrasound examinations during pregnancy, whereas non-users were generally content with the recommendation. The majority of respondents thought that commercialisation was not a problem at their institution, and reported that ultrasound is often performed without a medical indication. The ultrasound users thought that ultrasound is safe.

  • 2.
    Jansson, Caroline
    et al.
    Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    A Swedish study of midwives' and nurses' experiences when women are diagnosed with a missed miscarriage during a routine ultrasound scan2010In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to describe midwives' and nurses' experiences when women are diagnosed with a missed miscarriage during a routine ultrasound scan in pregnancy weeks 18-20.

    STUDY DESIGNS: A qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach and 13 semi-structured interviews were used for data collection from these three domains: midwives at an ultrasound department, midwives at a maternity clinic and nurses at a gynecological ward. Content analysis resulted in six codes, four categories and one primary theme.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The four categories identified were: the interviewees' experiences of women's reactions, support from the midwife and nurse, the interviewees' experiences of men's reactions and communication between care providers and women. The main theme focused on the interviewees' noting that women had a premonition that something was wrong with their pregnancy. This could for example have been in the form of minor bleeding or the fact that pregnancy symptoms had receded and there were no movements by the fetus. The midwives carried out a follow-up with assessment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women need confirmation of their premonitions of a missed miscarriage so that a diagnosis can be made as early as possible in their pregnancy. Women and their partners who have suffered a missed miscarriage need extended support on an individual basis in addition to follow-up assistance as assessed by the midwives.

  • 3.
    Linden, Karolina
    et al.
    Centre for Person-Centred Care, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Centre for Person-Centred Care, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Spraud-Lundin, Carina
    Centre for Person-Centred Care, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Well-being, diabetes management and breastfeeding in mothers with type 1 diabetes: An explorative analysis2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 15, p. 77-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to explore and investigate associations between well-being, diabetes management and breastfeeding in mothers with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) up to six months postpartum.

    Methods: An explorative analysis of self-reported questionnaires measuring general well-being, sense of coherence, self-efficacy of diabetes management and experiences of diabetes management during breastfeeding, which were distributed to 155 mothers with T1DM at two months and at six months after childbirth. The questionnaires were answered by 128 (82.5%) at two months and 137 (88.4%) at six months after birth. Statistical analysis included; descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon sign-rank test, sign test and Spearman’s correlationcoefficient (rs).

    Results: The majority of the mothers had fairly high levels of general well-being and diabetes management but aquarter had a low sense of coherence at both two and six months after birth. A weak association was found between more unstable blood glucose levels and lower general well-being at two months postpartum, but no other associations with erratic glycaemia was found. Those with lower grades of general well-being and sense of coherence had a higher need of professional support to manage their diabetes than they were offered, at both two and six months.

    Conclusion: To develop more optimal care routines for mothers with T1DM after childbirth, further studies areneeded to identify those most in need of additional support.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf