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  • 1.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Berg, Monika
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ojala, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Singleton, Benedict E
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Conditions for Transformative Learning for Sustainable Development: A Theoretical Review and Approach2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continued unsustainability and surpassed planetary boundaries require not only scientific and technological advances, but deep and enduring social and cultural changes. The purpose of this article is to contribute a theoretical approach to understand conditions and constraints for societal change towards sustainable development. In order to break with unsustainable norms, habits, practices, and structures, there is a need for learning for transformation, not only adaption. Based on a critical literature review within the field of learning for sustainable development, our approach is a development of the concept of transformative learning, by integrating three additional dimensions—Institutional Structures, Social Practices, and Conflict Perspectives. This approach acknowledges conflicts on macro, meso, and micro levels, as well as structural and cultural constraints. It contends that transformative learning is processual, interactional, long-term, and cumbersome. It takes place within existing institutions and social practices, while also transcending them. The article adopts an interdisciplinary social science perspective that acknowledges the importance of transformative learning in order for communities, organizations, and individuals to be able to deal with global sustainability problems, acknowledging the societal and personal conflicts involved in such transformation.

  • 2.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Invented communities and social vulnerability: The local post-disaster dynamics of extreme environmental events2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates post-disaster dynamics at the local level, in particular how local identity and social cohesion are affected after an extreme event. A particular case is investigated: the largest forest fire in modern Swedish history, which took place in 2014. The empirical material consists of interviews with forest professionals and organizations involved with the fire or the postfire work and a postal survey to all people directly affected by the wildfire. The analysis finds that the experience of the wildfire and its social interpretation led to the invention of a particular community identity, one that strengthened the self-understanding of the community. Thus, the post-disaster dynamics are pivotal for what social practices that emerge and what local identities are invented and thus may greatly affect the capacity of a community to handle extreme events.

  • 3.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sjödin, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Unintended consequences and risk(y) thinking: The shaping of consequences and responsibilities in relation to environmental disasters2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 2906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unintended consequences have long been central for the social sciences. But, the development of risk analysis and the adoption of risk language have substantial implications for how to understand and evaluate unintended consequences. Claims can now be raised that unintended consequences should have been foreseen and other options chosen. This situation constitutes the starting point for this paper, which develops an understanding of unintended consequences, in particular, in relation to environmental disasters. It draws on Robert Merton's classic work on unanticipated consequences, but refines and further develops it by fertilizing it with findings from risk sociology and framing theory. A particular case of a human-caused disaster, a severewildfire, is analyzed to illustrate and expand the understanding of unintended consequences. The empirical material consists of a postal survey to everyone directly affected by the wildfire (N = 960 individuals). The empirical results of this analysis are then explained and used to improve the understanding of unintended consequences, by showing how the context and framing of the disaster heavily affected the evaluation of its consequences, including unintended ones.

  • 4.
    Sannö, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Maria T.
    Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thollander, Patrik
    Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wollin, Johan
    Volvo Construction Equipment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Birgitta
    IVL, Swedish Environmental Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Approaching Sustainable Energy Management Operations in a Multinational Industrial Corporation2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large share of the energy efficiency improvement measures available for industrial companies remains unadopted due to the existence of various barriers to energy efficiency. One of the main means of overcoming barriers to energy efficiency is via energy management operations. The major parts of the published scientific papers have covered energy management on a company level or on a sector level. However, so far, the literature is scarce regarding empirical studies on energy management on a corporate level. With the aim of filling the research gap, the aim of this paper is to empirically assess the performance of an in-house energy management program adoption from the year of initiation and four years ahead in the multinational company Volvo CE. The paper was conducted as a case study including a participative approach, which has not previously been done in energy management research. This paper adds value, through complementing the existing literature on energy management on a factory or sector level, by highlighting the importance of leadership, speed of execution, and cultural transformation on a corporate level.

  • 5.
    Schaffer, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Physical Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eksvärd, Karin
    Inspire Action and Research (IA&R), Knivsta, Sweden.
    Björklund, Johanna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Can Agroforestry Grow beyond Its Niche and Contribute to a Transition towards Sustainable Agriculture in Sweden?2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 13, article id 3522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agroforestry is thought to be an approach that could support agriculture in the transition from a system with sustainability problems to one containing regenerative activities contributing to viable ecosystems and, therefore, sustainability solutions. A transdisciplinary and participatory action research (PAR) group that included farmers approached the development of temperate agroforestry systems in the modern agricultural setting of Sweden through practical experience on 12 farms for collective analysis. The objective was to research potential systems such as edible forest gardens, silvopasture and silvoarable systems to discuss their use and effects as well as scaling possibilities. Knowledge and experiences of challenges and solutions related to the development of agroforestry were identified at both niche and regime levels.

  • 6.
    Sund, Louise
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Pashby, Karen
    School of Childhood, Youth and Education Studies, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK.
    ‘Is It That We Do Not Want Them to Have Washing Machines?’: Ethical Global Issues Pedagogy in Swedish Classrooms2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 3552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to sustainable development target 4.7, by 2030, all signatory nations must ensure learners are provided with education for sustainable development and global citizenship. While many national curricula provide a policy imperative to provide a global dimension in curriculum and teaching, mainstreaming an approach to teaching about sustainable development through pressing global issues requires strong attention to what happens between students and teachers in the classroom. In this article, we aim to help teachers think through an ongoing reflexive approach to teaching by bridging important theoretical and empirical scholarship with the day-to-day pedagogies of global educators. This collaborative praxis offers an actionable approach to engaging with values, conflicts and ethical consequences towards bringing global issues into teaching and learning in a critical and fruitful way. Our results show that teachers and students can both experience discomfort and experience a sense of significance and worthiness of engaging in a more critical approach. In addition, if we critically reflect and support students in doing so, as these teachers have done, we open up possibilities for approaches to global issues pedagogy that come much closer to addressing the pressing issues of our deeply unequal world.

  • 7.
    Williams, Helén
    et al.
    Service Research Center and Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wikström, Fredrik
    Service Research Center and Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kristensson, Per
    Service Research Center and Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Decisions on Recycling or Waste: How Packaging Functions Affect the Fate of Used Packaging in Selected Swedish Households2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intention of this paper is to learn more about why consumers choose whether or not to recycle, with special attention given to the functions of the packaging itself, in order to provide suggestions for improvements in packaging design, recycling systems and the environmental assessment of different packaging designs. The study focussed on ten households in Sweden that where motivated to participate in the study in order to gain an understanding of the complex matter of this decision-making process. The intention of implementing an interview-based qualitative study was to gain rich data and to reach beyond the respondents’ immediate verbal responses. The respondents were interviewed with open-ended questions, which were supported with pictures of packaging; additionally, their waste bins were examined. This explorative study suggests a set of obstacles that cause consumers to dispose of packaging relating to the functions of packaging. The different obstacles that determine whether or not packaging is recycled were organised according to three different themes: the attitude towards cleanliness, the effort required to clean and sort and uncertainties about the best environmental alternative. The different functions of packaging do in fact influence all of the identified themes and; therefore, influence the decisions consumers make with regards to the recycling of specific packaging. The identified packaging functions were easy to separate different materials, easy to separate different parts, easy to clean, easy to empty, easy to reseal, easy to compress and communication regarding recycling. Consumer behaviour with regards to specific packaging functions and recycling should be further investigated. It should also be considered for inclusion in design processes, to increase the chance of materials being recycled, and in food-packaging life-cycle assessments, to provide results that align more closely with reality.

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