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  • 1.
    Ali, Mohamed A.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Novum, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden; Akershus Univ Coll, Fac Hlth Nutr & Management, Lillestrom, Norway.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Polyamines: dietary intake, database progress and food contribution to the total daily intake2009In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 55, p. 203-204Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Ax, Erika
    et al.
    Sjögren, Per
    Lind, P. Monica
    Lampa, Erik
    Salihovic, Samira
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lind, Lars
    Dietary pattern affects blood levels of environmental pollutants in elderly Swedish men and women2011In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 58, no Suppl. 3, p. 59-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bjarnholt, Christel
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Kugelberg, Susanna
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hughes, Roger
    Univ Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, Qld, Australia.
    Stockley, Lynn
    Stockley Associates, Nr Chepstow, England.
    Margetts, Barrie M.
    Univ Southampton, Southampton, England.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Perez Rodrigo, Carmen
    Bilbao Dept Publ Hlth, Bilbao, Spain.
    Kennedy, Nick
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Public health nutrition workforce development missing in european nutrition policies: the JOBNUT project2009In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 55, p. 185-185Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bjarnholt, Christel
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Krawinkel, Michael
    Univ Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Kristjansdottir, Asa G.
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Hlastan Ribic, Cirila
    Ctr Community Hlth, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel
    Univ Porto, Fac Ciencias Nutr & Alimentacao, P-4100 Oporto, Portugal.
    Francini, Bela
    Univ Porto, Fac Ciencias Nutr & Alimentacao, Oporto, Portugal.
    Papadaki, Alina
    Univ Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Karlsson, Christina
    ICA AB, Solna, Sweden.
    Brug, Johannes
    EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Maucec-Zakotnik, Jozica
    Ctr Community Hlth, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Duleva, Vesselka
    Natl Ctr Publ Hlth Protect, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Lien, Nanna
    Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    te Velde, Saskia
    EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Izquierdo de Santiago, Raquel
    Freshfel Europe, Brussels, Belgium.
    Roos, Eva
    Folkhalsan, Helsinki, Finland.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Binard, Philippe
    Freshfel Europe, Brussels, Belgium.
    Petrova, Stefka
    Natl Ctr Publ Hlth Protect, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Progreens: promotion of fruit and vegetable intake in school children across Europe2009In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 55, p. 504-504Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Brug, Johannes
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm , Sweden.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    The pro children study: conceptualization, baseline results and intervention development of a European effort to promote fruit and vegetable consumption in schoolchildren2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 209-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Geraedts, Maartje C. P.
    et al.
    Med Ctr, Dept Human Biol, Maastricht Univ, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Troost, Freddy J.
    Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Maastricht Univ, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Tinnemans, Rik
    Med Ctr, Dept Anim Res & Testing Serv, Maastricht Univ, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Soderholm, Johan D.
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Brummer, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Maastricht Univ, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Saris, Wim H. M.
    Med Ctr, Dept Human Biol, Maastricht Univ, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Release of Satiety Hormones in Response to Specific Dietary Proteins Is Different between Human and Murine Small Intestinal Mucosa2010In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 308-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: High protein diets are the most effective to stimulate cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) release; however, which proteins are the most potent is not known. Here, the effects of specific dietary proteins on intestinal CCK and GLP-1 release were examined. Methods: Duodenal biopsies of 10 healthy male subjects and 10 male rats were taken and placed in an Ussing chamber system. The biopsies were exposed on the luminal side to buffer, egg protein, codfish protein, ovomucoid, pea protein, and wheat protein. After an exposure time of 2 h, samples were taken from the serosal side. Results: Pea protein and wheat protein increased CCK and GLP-1 release in human duodenal tissue, while codfish protein only increased CCK release. No elevated levels of CCK and GLP-1 were found after exposure of rat tissue to different proteins. Conclusion: Pea and wheat protein are the most potent stimulators of CCK and GLP-1 release in human duodenal tissue, and may therefore be good dietary additives in weight management. Copyright (C) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 7.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    et al.
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo , Norway.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health, Bilbao, Spain.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent , Belgium.
    Due, P Pernille
    Department of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Haraldsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    König, Jurgen
    Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Promoting fruit and vegetable consumption among European schoolchildren: rationale, conceptualization and design of the pro children project2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 212-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The Pro Children Project was designed to assess fruit and vegetable consumption in European schoolchildren and their parents, as well as determinants of the children's consumption patterns. A second objective was to develop and test strategies, applicable across Europe, for promoting consumption of fruits and vegetables among schoolchildren and their parents. In this paper, the rationale, theoretical background, overall design and implementation of the project is presented.

    METHODS: Surveys of national, representative samples of 11-year-old schoolchildren and their parents were conducted in 9 countries, i.e. in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain and Sweden. Comprehensive school-based educational programmes have been developed and tested in three settings, i.e. in Spain, the Netherlands and in Norway. A precoded 24-hour recall form combined with a set of food frequency questions assessing regular intake were used to assess fruit and vegetable consumption. Determinants were assessed employing a comprehensive theoretical framework including personal, social and environmental factors related to fruit and vegetable consumption. The intervention programmes have been tested employing a group-randomized trial design where schools have been randomly allocated to an intervention arm and a delayed intervention arm. Surveys among all participating children and their parents were conducted prior to the initiation of the intervention, immediately after the end of the intervention and at the end of the subsequent school year.

    CONCLUSION: The project is expected to provide new information of great importance for improving our understanding of consumption patterns of fruits and vegetables and for guiding future efforts to promote increased consumption patterns across Europe.

  • 8.
    Lehto, Elviira
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ray, Carola
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital & Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Roos, Eva
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    The ones with lowest fruit and vegetable intake benefitted of the intervention only moderately2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 360-361Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Infrequent fruit and vegetable (FV) intake is especially common among children with low parental educational level (PEL) and among boys.

    Objectives: Our aim was to examine whether a school-based intervention was efficient in increasing children’s FV intake especially among those whose FV intake is the lowest and which factors could explain the the group differences in the associations.

    Method / Design: In Finland 11-year-old (at baseline) children participated in the PRO GREENS intervention in winter 2009. In control schools were 424 and in intervention schools 386 children (response rate 77%). Children filled in validated food frequency questionnaire assessing FV intake (times/day) and a validated questionnaire about factors influencing FV intake (availability of FV, liking for FV, preferences, self-efficacy to eat FV, attitudes towards FV and knowledge of the recommendations) both at baseline May 2009 and follow-up May 2010. Parental educational level (low, middle, high) was reported by the parents. Associations were examined with linear regression and mediation analyses.

    Results: The intervention increased fruit intake among girls but not among boys. Intervention increased also children’s knowledge of the recommendations. Since knowledge had no impact on boys’ fruit intake, the increase in knowledge mediated only intervention’s effect on girls’ fruit intake. Intervention increased children’s fruit intake similarly in all PEL groups.Intervention increased vegetable intake only in the middle PEL group but no intervention effect was noted among children with low or high PEL. Knowledge, the only factor which mediated the intervention’s effect on children’s vegetable intake, could not explain PEL differences in the effectivity of the intervention.

    Conclusions: Increase in knowledge was not a sufficient prerequisite to increase FV intake among boys or the lowest PEL group. More in depth analyses are needed to find out which factors to target in interventions to reach an effect in the target groups.

  • 9.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fasano, Alessio
    Mucosal Biology Research Center, Center for Celiac Research, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore MD, United States.
    Timing of Introduction of Gluten and Celiac Disease Risk2012In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 60, no Suppl. 2, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast milk is the natural nutrition for infants, but in the second half of the first year of life, complementary feeding is needed. Many complementary foods contain gluten, but gluten exposure is associated with the risk of developing celiac disease (CD). CD is a disease with considerable morbidity and mortality. Although CD is associated with certain genetic features, carrying the human leukocyte antigen haplotypes DQ2 or DQ8 (a prerequisite for CD development) cannot fully explain who will or who will not develop CD. Potential risk factors for CD include perinatal events and infant feeding practice. With the exception that children who are breastfed at and beyond gluten introduction into the diet probably may be at a lower risk of developing CD, and that heavy gluten load early in life may increase the risk of future CD, data on the impact of infant feeding are inconsistent.

  • 10.
    Olang, Beheshteh
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dorosty, Ahmad Reza
    NNFTRI, Tehran, Iran.
    Palesh, Mohammad
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Azadnyia, Ebrahim
    NNFTRI, Tehran, Iran.
    Hellstrand, Sophie
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strandvik, Birgitta
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Polyunsaturated n-3 and 6 fatty acids differ significantly in colostrum in relation to fish intake during pregnancy2009In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 55, p. 323-323Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Olang, Beheshteh
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Farivar, Khalil
    Minist Healyh, Tehran, Iran.
    Strandvik, Birgitta
    Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Vitamin a and d status in iranian infants2009In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 55, p. 249-249Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Sandvik, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo; Research Centre for Health Promotion, Department of Education and Health Promotion, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent , Belgium.
    Due, Pernille
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam , The Netherlands; f Community Nutrition Unit of Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain.
    Wind, Marianne
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam , The Netherlands; f Community Nutrition Unit of Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain.
    Bere, Elling
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit of Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain.
    Wolf, Alexandra
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo.
    Personal, social and environmental factors regarding fruit and vegetable intake among schoolchildren in nine European countries2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 255-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Children in Europe are consuming less fruit and vegetables than recommended. Knowledge about the potential determinants of fruit and vegetable intake is vital to understand discrepancies in intake and to guide interventions. The aim of the present study was to assess personal, social and environmental factors regarding fruit and vegetable intake among 11- to 12-year-old children in Europe.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken, with nationally or regionally representative samples of in total 13,305 children (mean age 11.4 years) from nine European countries. Pupils in the classroom completed a self-administered questionnaire measuring fruit and vegetable intake and personal, social and environmental factors during one school lesson. Age-adjusted covariance analyses were carried out by gender, for the full sample and for each country separately. Proportions responding positively to the constructs are presented.

    RESULTS: Overall, European children held a positive attitude towards fruit and vegetable intake. For some constructs, large between-country differences were found. Children had a more positive attitude towards fruit than towards vegetables, and girls were on average more positive than boys. The children perceived their social environment as supportive towards fruit and vegetable intake. They reported good to very good availability of fruit and vegetables at home. However, availability at school and during leisure time activities seemed to be low, both for fruit and for vegetables.

    CONCLUSION: A large majority of the children reported positively to the personal and social factors regarding fruit and vegetable intake. As regards availability of fruit and vegetables at school and leisure time, and accessibility of fruit and vegetables at home, there is room for improvement.

  • 13.
    Scander, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Food and drink combinations in Swedish meals2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 13-13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish national survey on dietary intake, Riksmaten, which took place in 2010-11, included details on day of the week, time point of consumption as well as where meals were consumed. The dietary data were collected through an online registration covering four days, combined with questionnaire data on educational level, lifestyle habits and self-perceived health. The data have previously been presented in regards to nutrient intake and food choice related to educational level. An interesting analysis on which drink that is consumed (or reported to be consumed) at different types of meals and with different food combinations and energy intakes has been undertaken.

    The results show large differences in choice of drink depending on food choice, gender, day of the week and time of day. We have also shown that a large proportion of the energy intake comes from consumption of sweet or alcoholic drinks in between meals and in combination with meals.

    It is important to inform the public about the choice of drink in relation to energy intake, especially for those aiming to restrict their intake. Our results will present a background for such guidelines. Some surprising results in regards to taste combinations will also be briefly discussed, from the sommelier’s horizon.

  • 14.
    Scander, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Energy contribution patterns from drink and food in Riksmaten2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 200-200Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Since appetite control works differently in fluid and solid intake we wanted to analyse the energy contribution from those two types of energy sources.

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the beverage contribution of energy in Swedish meals, according to data from the National Survey (Riksmaten 2010-2011).

    Method / Design: Around 1800 adult Swedes reported dietary intake data for four consecutive days - specified by portion size, type of meal, time point, day of the week and venue. The intake was reported in a web-based food diary. Energy contribution from drinks and food respectively was analysed, by weekday and type of meal, in regards to sugar containing drinks and those containing alcohol.

    Results: The results show that the reported consumption of al-cohol was highest at home on weekends. The contribution of energy from drinks could be rather high, especially at dinner on Friday and Saturday night. The mean energy contribution from drinks in the daily intake was 235 kcal ± 231 (SD). This corresponds to 11.8 ± 10.8 (SD) energy percent (E%), varying from 9.1 (Wednesday) to 17.1 (Satur-day) E%. Problems in the interpretation of the data that need to be closely monitored are for example portion size, reluctance to report sweet and alcohol-containing drinks, difficulties in estimating dilution of different types of cordial and alcohol content in wine and beer.

    Conclusions: Drinks were contributing substantially to the total energy intake over the day. The sweet and alcoholic drinks are im-portant in this regard, but also juices and coffee drinks. The problems in regards to the increased alcohol content of beer and red wine on the Swedish market will be further discussed with the Swedish Food Administration, to encourage development of a more comprehensive set of alternatives in the database

  • 15. Syvanen, Tiina
    et al.
    Stavréus-Evers, Anneli
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folate status and polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) gene in infertile women2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 111-111Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Historical aspects of commensality during meals in Europe2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 13-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Who are we eating with? There are always companions to relate to in a meal, both to those who are present and they who are on another place or even in a past history. The choice of food and beverages at the market, the selection of flavour and texture combinations, coo-king processes and serving the food with different utensils are all originating from a cultural, religious or social context. Commensality therefore seems to not only to be eating together at the same table but also eating with non-present table guests and relations.

    During the 20th century in Sweden the eating context and commensality has changed due to urbanization, changing of how families are created, education levels and gender equality. An increased distance between living place and work has made commuting necessary, which effects the commensality at home but also how meals are shared within the work team you belong to. In Sweden’s major cities it is today often more common to live as single but is a single person eating done alone or do you take part of an immaterial commensality when you live by yourself ? The societal changes give an indication that commensality is changing over time and this is probably an expression of values related to the present time and trends (Zeitgeist). The current use of “communal tables” at restaurants might illustrate a need for socializing when eating and also make it easier to go to restaurants when single.

    In my presentation I will discuss the question of foods’, beverages’ and the meals’ inner cultural values which can be observed in Sweden the last hundred years and how they interact with the purpose of eating. I will also discuss eating events and raise the question if it is actually the commensality we are consuming, and not the food.

  • 17.
    Thulin, Susanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjarnholt, Christel
    Perez Rodrigo, Carmen
    Kennedy, Nick
    Margetts, Barrie
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Workforce development for public health nutritionists: The JOBNUT project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 89-89Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Thulin, Susanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hughes, Roger
    Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Bjarnholt, Christel
    Unit for Public Health Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Workforce development: The neglected strategy in national nutrition action plans in the European Union2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 320-320Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Wolf, Alexandra
    et al.
    Institute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria .
    Yngve, Agneta
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    Institute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; University of Vienna, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao, Spain .
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Haraldsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands .
    Maes, Lea
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal .
    Krølner, Rikke
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Fruit and vegetable intake of mothers of 11-year-old children in nine European countries: the Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 246-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare fruit and vegetable intakes of mothers of 11-year-old children across Europe.

    METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in 9 European countries in October/November 2003. Self-administered questionnaires assessing fruit and vegetable consumption were used for data collection. The current paper presents dietary intake data obtained by a precoded 24-hour recall and a food frequency questionnaire.

    RESULTS: The consumption levels of fruit and vegetables (without fruit juice) were in line with World Health Organization recommendations of > or =400 g/day for only 27% of all participating mothers. Based on both instruments, the Pro Children results showed comparatively high average fruit intake levels in Portugal, Denmark and Sweden (211, 203 and 194 g/day) and the lowest intake in Iceland (97 g/day). High vegetable intake levels were found in Portugal and Belgium (169 and 150 g/day), the lowest in Spain (88 g/day). A south-north gradient could not be observed in the Pro Children study.

    CONCLUSION: Fruit and vegetable intakes are low in mothers of 11-year-olds across Europe. Especially vegetable consumption can be regarded as marginal in most of the studied European countries. A high percentage of mothers indicated to eat fruit and vegetables less than once a day. The results have shown that national and international interventions are necessary to promote fruit and especially vegetable consumption in the European population of mothers.

  • 20.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Introduction2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no Suppl. 1, p. 12-12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, dietary assessment is mostly dealing with nutritional quality of the meal and to a lesser extent assesses the environment, the commensality and the design of the meal as such. This seminar is an effort to combine anthropology, meal design and nutrition in a common seminar to increase mutual understanding of a widened approach to meal assessment. Previously, the five aspects meal model has been proposed as a theoretical framework for commercial meal planning and quality assurance. This model includes the product, the room and the service, combined with the ambience and the management system. In this introductory talk, the five aspects meal model will be compared with methods of marketing, including, product, place, price and promotion and with consumer orientation aspects of social marketing. In the broader aspect of public meal planning, consumer orientation aspects are suggested to be an integral part of meal assessment. Issues related to sustainability, food waste and nutritional status and well-being in a broader sense also need to be taken into consideration in the planning of public meals as well as in the provision of meal guidelines and – support to the public. The other presentations during this symposium deal with meal design in three different contexts, a new way of assessment of individual food choice and a historical overview of commensality and meal design.

  • 21.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Meal design and assessment: Introduction2015In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 67, no suppl. 1, p. 12-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Wolf, Alexandra
    Grjibovski, Andrej
    Brug, Johannes
    Due, Pernille
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    Franchini, Bela
    Rodrigo, Carmen Perez
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Rasmussen, Mette
    Thorsdottir, Lnga
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Prevalence of overweight and obesity in 11-year old in 9 European countries: (The Pro Children Study)2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 60-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    A European network for public health nutrition: The EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 321-322Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thulin, Susanna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kennedy, Nick
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Margetts, Barrie
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leonhauser, Ingrid-Ute
    Univ Giessen, D-35390 Giessen, Germany.
    Training in public health nutrition in Europe results from the EUNUTNET project2007In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 51, p. 334-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Yngve, Agneta
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Medical Nutrition/Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Wolf, Alexandra
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmadfa, Ibrahim
    nstitute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Brug, Johannes
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franchini, Bela
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Haraldsdóttir, Jóhanna
    Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krølner, Rikke
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Maes, Lea
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent , Belgium.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao, Spain.
    Sjoström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thórsdóttir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: the pro children cross-sectional survey2005In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 236-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries.

    METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups.

    RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland.

    CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.

1 - 25 of 25
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