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  • 1.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Skills Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Berndtzon, Magnus
    Metodikum – Skill Centre of Medical Simulation Region County Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Carlzon, Liisa
    Simulation Centre West, Department of Research, Education and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    Institute of Medicine and Health, Medical Faculty, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical Faculty, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Research, Education and Development and Innovation, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Masiello, Italo
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kallestedt, Marie-Louise Södersved
    Clinical Skills Centre, Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Tamás, Éva
    Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Institute of Medicine and Health, Medical Faculty, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Confident but not theoretically grounded - experienced simulation educators' perceptions of their own professional development2017In: Advances in Medical Education and Practice, ISSN 1179-7258, E-ISSN 1179-7258, Vol. 8, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Medical simulation enables the design of learning activities for competency areas (eg, communication and leadership) identified as crucial for future health care professionals. Simulation educators and medical teachers follow different career paths, and their education backgrounds and teaching contexts may be very different in a simulation setting. Although they have a key role in facilitating learning, information on the continuing professional development (pedagogical development) of simulation educators is not available in the literature.

    Objectives: To explore changes in experienced simulation educators' perceptions of their own teaching skills, practices, and understanding of teaching over time.

    Methods: A qualitative exploratory study. Fourteen experienced simulation educators participated in individual open-ended interviews focusing on their development as simulation educators. Data were analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis.

    Results: Marked educator development was discerned over time, expressed mainly in an altered way of thinking and acting. Five themes were identified: shifting focus, from following to utilizing a structure, setting goals, application of technology, and alignment with profession. Being confident in the role as an instructor seemed to constitute a foundation for the instructor's pedagogical development.

    Conclusion: Experienced simulation educators' pedagogical development was based on self-confidence in the educator role, and not on a deeper theoretical understanding of teaching and learning. This is the first clue to gain increased understanding regarding educational level and possible education needs among simulation educators, and it might generate several lines of research for further studies.

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