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  • 1. Nambu, K.
    et al.
    van Hees, Patrick A. W.
    Jones, D. L.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Vinogradoff, S.
    Lundström, U. S.
    Composition of organic solutes and respiration in soils derived from alkaline and non-alkaline parent materials2008In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 144, no 3-4, p. 468-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parent material greatly influences pedogenesis and soil nutrient availability and consequently we hypothesized that it would significantly affect the amount of organic solutes in soil, many of which have been implicated in rhizosphere processes linked to plant nutrient uptake. Consequently, we investigated the influence of two contrasting parent materials in which calcite was present or absent (alkaline and non-alkaline soils) on the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), low-molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) and glucose in soil solution. Both soils were under Norway spruce. The dynamics of LMWOAs in soil were also investigated using 14C-labelled citrate and oxalate. Some of the mineral horizons of the alkaline soils showed significantly higher concentrations of DOC, phenolics, and fumarate in soil solution and also a higher basal respiration. No major differences were seen in organic solute status in the organic horizons of the two soil types. LMWOAs were present at low concentrations in soil solution (< 1 to 25 ΌM). Their mineralization rate significantly decreased with soil depth, however, overall neither their concentration or half-life in soil was markedly affected by parent material. The alkaline soils had significantly higher CO2-to-soil organic C (SOC) ratios, and consequently SOC in the alkaline soils did not seem more chemically stable against mineralization. Considering possible DOC and CO2 efflux rates it was suggested that the equal or larger SOC stocks in alkaline mineral soils were most likely linked to a higher net primary productivity. In conclusion, our study found that parent material exerted only a small effect on the concentration and dynamics of organic solutes in soil solution. This suggests that in comparison to other factors (e.g. vegetation cover, climate etc) parent material may not be a major regulator of the organic solute pool in soil. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    van Hees, Patrick A. W.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Rosling, A.
    Lundstrom, U. S.
    Finlay, R. D.
    The biogeochemical impact of ectomycorrhizal conifers on major soil elements (Al, Fe, K and Si)2006In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 136, no 1-2, p. 364-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobilisation of nutrients and dissolution of minerals are of key importance for plant growth and soil formation, as well as long term ecosystem sustainability. The effects of Pinus sylvestris seedlings, ectomycorrhizal colonisation and potassium supply on the mobilisation of Al, Fe, K and Si were studied in a soil column experiment. Budgets were constructed considering amounts in drainage water, accumulation in plants and changes in the pools of exchangeable ions (BaCl2 extractions). Drainage was the most important sink under the experimental conditions imposed, but the other two pools were also of quantitative significance. Plants had a significant positive effect on the total quantities of all elements mobilized. Mycorrhizal colonisation had limited quantitative impact on the mobilization, probably because the chosen mycorrhizal fungi did not cause any growth promotion in this experiment. Despite this, a multivariate analysis (PCA) showed a clear separate grouping of mycorrhizal, non-mycorrhizal and no-plant treatments, and in particular Si and K mobilization was related to soil biological variables which in turn were affected by the presence of mycorrhiza. When K was omitted from the watering solution, plants were able to mobilise significantly more K, which was reflected in plant uptake and a potential replenishment of the exchangeable pool. Up-scaling of total Al, K and Si mobilization to field conditions resulted in rates between equal to and up to 10 times higher than the average historical weathering rate. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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