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  • 1.
    Fan, Chuan-Wen
    et al.
    Institute of Digestive Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, Chengdu, China; Department of Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kopsida, Maria
    Department of Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Liu, You-Bin
    Institute of Digestive Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, Chengdu, China; Department of Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Zhang, Hong
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Gao, Jing-Fang
    Department of Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Department of Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cao, Si-Yu-Wei
    Department of Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Li, Yuan
    Institute of Digestive Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, Chengdu, China.
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Institute of Digestive Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, Chengdu, China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Department of Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Prognostic Heterogeneity of MRE11 Based on the Location of Primary Colorectal Cancer Is Caused by Activation of Different Immune Signals2020In: Frontiers in Oncology, ISSN 2234-943X, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 9, article id 1465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: MRE11 plays an important role in DNA damage response for the maintenance of genome stability, and is becoming a prognostic marker for cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the correlations of MRE11 to prognosis and tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells (TIICs) in different locations of CRC remains unclear.

    Methods: Among Swedish and TCGA-COREAD patients, we investigated the association of MRE11 expression, tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells (TIICs) and microsatellite status with survival in right-sided colon cancer (RSCC) and left-sided colon and rectal cancer (LSCRC). The signaling of MRE11-related was further analyzed using weighted gene co-expression network analysis and ClueGO.

    Results: High MRE11 expression alone or combination of high MRE11 expression with high TIICs was related to favorable prognosis in LSCRC. Moreover, high MRE11 expression was associated with favorable prognosis in LSCRC with microsatellite stability. The relationships above were adjusted for tumor stage, differentiation, and/or TIICs. However, no such evidence was observed in RSCC. Several signaling pathways involving MRE11 were found to be associated with cell cycle and DNA repair in RSCC and LSCRC, whereas, the activation of the immune response and necrotic cell death were specifically correlated with LSCRC.

    Conclusions: High MRE11 expression is an independent prognostic marker in LSCRC and enhanced prognostic potency of combining high MRE11 with high TIICs in LSCRC, mainly due to differential immune signaling activated by MRE11 in RSCC and LSCRC, respectively.

  • 2.
    Mäkitie, Antti A.
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Division of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keski-Säntti, Harri
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Markkanen-Leppänen, Mari
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Bäck, Leif
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Koivunen, Petri
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Ekberg, Tomas
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandström, Karl
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Laurell, Göran
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Von Beckerath, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nilsson, Johan S.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Wahlberg, Peter
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Greiff, Lennart
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Spaak, Lena Norberg
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kjaergaard, Thomas
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Godballe, Christian
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Rikardsen, Oddveig
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital North Norway, Tromsoe, Norway.
    Channir, Hani Ibrahim
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rubek, Niclas
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    von Buchwald, Christian
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Transoral Robotic Surgery in the Nordic Countries: Current Status and Perspectives2018In: Frontiers in Oncology, ISSN 2234-943X, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 8, article id 289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The five Nordic countries with a population of 27 M people form a rather homogenous region in terms of health care. The management of head and neck cancer is centralized to the 21 university hospitals in these countries. Our aim was to gain an overview of the volume and role of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and to evaluate the need to centralize it in this area as the field is rapidly developing.

    Materials and Methods: A structured questionnaire was sent to all 10 Departments of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in the Nordic countries having an active programme for TORS in December 2017.

    Results: The total cumulative number of performed robotic surgeries at these 10 Nordic centers was 528 and varied between 5 and 240 per center. The median annual number of robotic surgeries was 38 (range, 5-60). The observed number of annually operated cases remained fairly low (<25) at most of the centers.

    Conclusions: The present results showing a limited volume of performed surgeries call for considerations to further centralize TORS in the Nordic countries.

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