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  • 1.
    Castelan, Florence P.
    et al.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center, São Paulo Research Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Castro Alves, Victor
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center, São Paulo Research Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Saraiva, Lorenzo A.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Nacsimento, Talita P.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Cálhau, Maria F. N. S.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Dias, Carlos T. S.
    Department of Exact Sciences, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil.
    Cordenunsi-Lysenko, Beatriz R.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center, São Paulo Research Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center (NAPAN), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Natural Ecosystem Surrounding a Conventional Banana Crop Improves Plant Health and Fruit Quality2018In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 9, article id 759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural ecosystems near agricultural landscapes may provide rich environments for growing crops. However, the effect of a natural ecosystem on crop health and fruit quality is poorly understood. In the present study, it was investigated whether the presence of a natural ecosystem surrounding a crop area influences banana plant health and fruit postharvest behavior. Plants from two conventional banana crop areas with identical planting time and cultural practices were used; the only difference between banana crop areas is that one area was surrounded by a natural forest (Atlantic forest) fragment (Near-NF), while the other area was inserted at the center of a conventional banana crop (Distant-NF). Results showed that bananas harvested from Near-NF showed higher greenlife and a more homogeneous profile during ripening compared to fruits harvested from Distant-NF. Differences in quality parameters including greenlife, carbohydrate profile, and pulp firmness between fruits harvested from Near-NF and Distant-NF are explained, at least partly, by differences in the balance of plant growth regulators (indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid) in bananas during ripening. Furthermore, plants from Near-NF showed a lower severity index of black leaf streak disease (BLSD) and higher levels of phenolic compounds in leaves compared to plants from Distant-NF. Together, the results provide additional evidence on how the maintenance of natural ecosystems near conventional crop areas could be a promising tool to improve plant health and fruit quality.

  • 2.
    Cordenunsi-Lysenko, Beatriz R.
    et al.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), São Paulo Research Foundation (CEPID-FAPESP), São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center (NAPAN), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Nascimento, Joao R. O.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), São Paulo Research Foundation (CEPID-FAPESP), São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center (NAPAN), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Castro-Alves, Victor
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), São Paulo Research Foundation (CEPID-FAPESP), São Paulo, Brazil.
    Purgatto, Eduardo
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), São Paulo Research Foundation (CEPID-FAPESP), São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center (NAPAN), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Fabi, Joao P.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), São Paulo Research Foundation (CEPID-FAPESP), São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center (NAPAN), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Peroni-Okyta, Fernanda H. G.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), São Paulo Research Foundation (CEPID-FAPESP), São Paulo, Brazil.
    The Starch Is (Not) Just Another Brick in the Wall: The Primary Metabolism of Sugars During Banana Ripening2019In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 10, article id 391Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The monocot banana fruit is one of the most important crops worldwide. As a typical climacteric fruit, the harvest of commercial bananas usually occurs when the fruit is physiologically mature but unripe. The universal treatment of green bananas with ethylene or ethylene-releasing compounds in order to accelerate and standardize the ripening of a bunch of bananas mimics natural maturation after increasing the exogenous production of ethylene. The trigger of autocatalytic ethylene production regulated by a dual positive feedback loop circuit derived from a NAC gene and three MADS genes results in metabolic processes that induce changes in the primary metabolism of bananas. These changes include pulp softening and sweetening which are sensorial attributes that determine banana postharvest quality. During fruit development, bananas accumulate large amounts of starch (between 15 and 35% w/w of their fresh weight, depending on the cultivar). Pulp softening and sweetening during banana ripening are attributed not only to changes in the activities of cell wall hydrolases but also to starch-to-sugar metabolism. Therefore, starch granule erosion and disassembling are key events that lead bananas to reach their optimal postharvest quality. The knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate sugar primary metabolism during banana ripening is fundamental to reduce postharvest losses and improve final product quality, though. Recent studies have shown that ethylene-mediated regulation of starch-degrading enzymes at transcriptional and translational levels is crucial for sugar metabolism in banana ripening. Furthermore, the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones including indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid also influences primary sugar metabolism. In this review, we will describe the state-of-the-art sugar primary metabolism in bananas and discuss the recent findings that shed light on the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of this metabolism during fruit ripening.

  • 3.
    Fabi, Joao Paulo
    et al.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), CEPID-FAPESP (Research, Innovation and Dissemination Centers, São Paulo Research Foundation), São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center (NAPAN), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Ramos do Prado, Samira Bernardino
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center (FoRC), CEPID-FAPESP (Research, Innovation and Dissemination Centers, São Paulo Research Foundation), São Paulo, Brazil.
    Fast and furious: Ethylene-triggered changes in the metabolism of papaya fruit during ripening2019In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 10, article id 535Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Papaya is a climacteric fleshy fruit characterized by fast ripening after harvest. During the relatively short postharvest period, papaya fruit undergoes several changes in metabolism that result in pulp softening and sweetening, as well as the development of a characteristic aroma. Since papaya is one of the most cultivated and appreciated tropical fruit crops worldwide, extensive research has been conducted to not only understand the formation of the quality and nutritional attributes of ripe fruit but also to develop methods for controlling the ripening process. However, most strategies to postpone papaya ripening, and therefore to increase shelf life, have failed to maintain fruit quality. Ethylene blockage precludes carotenoid biosynthesis, while cold storage can induce chilling injury and negatively affect the volatile profile of papaya. As a climacteric fruit, the fast ripening of papaya is triggered by ethylene biosynthesis. The generation of the climacteric ethylene positive feedback loop is elicited by the expression of a specific transcription factor that leads to an up-regulation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (ACS) and ACC-oxidase (ACO) expression, triggering the system II ethylene biosynthesis. The ethylene burst occurs about 3 to 4 days after harvest and induces pectinase expression. The disassembling of the papaya cell wall appears to help in fruit sweetness, while glucose and fructose are also produced by acidic invertases. The increase in ethylene production also results in carotenoid accumulation due to the induction of cyclases and hydroxylases, leading to yellow and red/orange-colored pulp phenotypes. Moreover, the production of volatile terpene linalool, an important biological marker for papaya’s sensorial quality, is also induced by ethylene. All these mentioned processes are related to papaya’s sensorial and nutritional quality. We describe the understanding of ethylene-triggered events that influence papaya quality and nutritional traits, as these characteristics are a consequence of an accelerated metabolism during fruit ripening.

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    Fast and Furious - Ethylene-Triggered Changes in the Metabolism of Papaya Fruit During Ripening
  • 4.
    Leppälä, Johanna
    et al.
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Centre, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Gaupels, Frank
    Institute of Biochemical Plant Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Xu, Enjun
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Centre, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Morales, Luis Orlando
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Centre, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Durner, Jörg
    Institute of Biochemical Plant Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Brosché, Mikael
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Centre, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ozone and nitrogen dioxide regulate similar gene expression responses in Arabidopsis but natural variation in the extent of cell death is likely controlled by different genetic loci2022In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 13, article id 994779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High doses of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) cause damage and cell death in plants. These two gases are among the most harmful air pollutants for ecosystems and therefore it is important to understand how plant resistance or sensitivity to these gases work at the molecular level and its genetic control. We compared transcriptome data from O3 and NO2 fumigations to other cell death related treatments, as well as individual marker gene transcript level in different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. Our analysis revealed that O3 and NO2 trigger very similar gene expression responses that include genes involved in pathogen resistance, cell death and ethylene signaling. However, we also identified exceptions, for example RBOHF encoding a reactive oxygen species producing RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE PROTEIN F. This gene had increased transcript levels by O3 but decreased transcript levels by NO2, showing that plants can identify each of the gases separately and activate distinct signaling pathways. To understand the genetics, we conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) on O3 and NO2 tolerance of natural Arabidopsis accessions. Sensitivity to both gases seem to be controlled by several independent small effect loci and we did not find an overlap in the significantly associated regions. Further characterization of the GWAS candidate loci identified new regulators of O3 and NO2 induced cell death including ABH1, a protein that functions in abscisic acid signaling, mRNA splicing and miRNA processing. The GWAS results will facilitate further characterization of the control of programmed cell death and differences between oxidative and nitrosative stress in plants.

  • 5.
    Palma, Carolina Falcato Fialho
    et al.
    Department of Food Science, Plant, Food & Climate, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Castro Alves, Victor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Morales, Luis Orlando
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rosenqvist, Eva
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Crop Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Taastrup, Denmark.
    Ottosen, Carl-Otto
    Department of Food Science, Plant, Food & Climate, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Strid, Åke
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Spectral composition of light affects plant sensitivity to UV-B and photoinhibition in cucumber2021In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 11, article id 610011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B, 280 – 315 nm) and ultraviolet A (UV-A, 315-400 nm) radiation comprise small portions of the solar radiation but regulate many aspects of plant development, physiology and metabolism. Until now, how plants respond to UV-B in the presence of different light qualities is poorly understood. This study aimed to assess the effects of a low UV-B dose (0.912± 0.074 kJ m-2 day-1, at a 6 h daily UV exposure) in combination with four light treatments (blue, green, red and broadband white at 210 μmol m-2 s-1 Photosynthetic active radiation [PAR]) on morphological and physiological responses of cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv. ‘Lausanna RZ F1’). We explored the effects of light quality backgrounds on plant morphology, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, epidermal pigment accumulation, and on acclimation ability to saturating light intensity. Our results showed that supplementary UV-B significantly decreased biomass accumulation in the presence of broad band white, blue and green light, but not under red light. UV‐B also reduced the photosynthetic efficiency of CO2 fixation (α) when combined with blue light. These plants, despite showing high accumulation of anthocyanins, were unable to cope with saturating light conditions. No significant effects of UV-B in combination with green light were observed for gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, but supplementary UV-B significantly increased chlorophyll and flavonol contents in the leaf epidermis. Plants grown under red light and UV-B significantly increased maximum photosynthetic rate and dark respiration compared to pure red light. Additionally, red and UV-B treated plants during with saturating light intensity showed an higher quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII), fraction of open PSII centres and electron transport rate and showed no effect on the apparent maximum quantum efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm) or non-photochemical quenching in contrast to solely red-light conditions. These findings provide new insights into how plants respond to UV-B radiation in the presence of different light spectra.

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    Spectral Composition of Light Affects Sensitivity to UV-B and Photoinhibition in Cucumber
  • 6.
    Pan, Yue
    et al.
    Laboratory of Biological Invasion and Ecosecurity, Yunnan University, Kunming, China; Eco-Development Academy, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming, China.
    Zhao, Tao
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Krokene, Paal
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Ås, Norway.
    Yu, Ze-fen
    Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources, Key Laboratory Resources of the Ministry of Education, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Qiao, Min
    Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources, Key Laboratory Resources of the Ministry of Education, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Lu, Jun
    Laboratory of Biological Invasion and Ecosecurity, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Chen, Peng
    Yunnan Academy of Forestry, Kunming, China.
    Ye, Hui
    Laboratory of Biological Invasion and Ecosecurity, Yunnan University, Kunming, China; Laboratory of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.
    Bark Beetle-Associated Blue-Stain Fungi Increase Antioxidant Enzyme Activities and Monoterpene Concentrations in Pinus yunnanensis2018In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 9, article id 1731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yunnan pine is the most important tree species in SW China in both economical and ecological terms, but it is often killed by pine shoot beetles (Tomicus spp.). Tomicus beetles are secondary pests in temperate regions and the aggressiveness of the beetles in SW China is considered to be due to the warm subtropical climates as well as the beetles' virulent fungal associates. Here, we assessed the virulence of three blue-stain fungi (Leptographium wushanense, L. sinense and Ophiostoma canum) associated with pine shoot beetles to Yunnan pine (Pinus yunnanensis) in SW China. Following fungal inoculation, we measured necrotic lesion lengths, antioxidant enzyme activities and monoterpene concentrations in the stem phloem of Yunnan pine. Leptographium wushanense induced twice as long lesions as L. sinense and O. canum, and all three fungi induced significantly longer lesions than sterile agar control inoculations. The activity of three tested antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and superoxide dismutase) increased after both fungal inoculation and control inoculation. However, L. wushanense and L. sinense generally caused a greater increase in enzyme activities than O. canum and the control treatment. Fungal inoculation induced stronger increases in six major monoterpenes than the control treatment, but the difference was significant only for some fungus-monoterpene combinations. Overall, our results show that L. wushanense and L. sinense elicit stronger defense responses and thus are more virulent to Yunnan pine than O. canum. The two Leptographium species may thus contribute to the aggressiveness of their beetle vectors and could damage Yunnan pine across SW China if they spread from the restricted geographical area they have been found in so far.

  • 7.
    Puentes, Adriana
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhao, Tao
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lundborg, Lina
    Department of Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Niklas
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    Department of Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Chemical Engineering, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Variation in Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Defense Among Norway Spruce Clones and Trade-Offs in Resistance Against a Fungal and an Insect Pest2021In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 12, article id 678959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An essential component of plant defense is the change that occurs from a constitutive to an induced state following damage or infection. Exogenous application of the plant hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has shown great potential to be used as a defense inducer prior to pest exposure, and could be used as a plant protection measure. Here, we examined (1) the importance of MeJA-mediated induction for Norway spruce (Picea abies) resistance against damage by the pine weevil Hylobius abietis, which poses a threat to seedling survival, and infection by the spruce bark beetle-associated blue-stain fungus Endoconidiophora polonica, (2) genotypic variation in MeJA-induced defense (terpene chemistry), and (3) correlations among resistance to each pest. In a semi-field experiment, we exposed rooted-cuttings from nine different Norway spruce clones to insect damage and fungal infection separately. Plants were treated with 0, 25, or 50 mM MeJA, and planted in blocks where only pine weevils were released, or in a separate block in which plants were fungus-inoculated or not (control group). As measures of resistance, stem area debarked and fungal lesion lengths were assessed, and as a measure of defensive capacity, terpene chemistry was examined. We found that MeJA treatment increased resistance to H. abietis and E. polonica, but effects varied with clone. Norway spruce clones that exhibited high constitutive resistance did not show large changes in area debarked or lesion length when MeJA-treated, and vice versa. Moreover, insect damage negatively correlated with fungal infection. Clones receiving little pine weevil damage experienced larger lesion lengths, and vice versa, both in the constitutive and induced states. Changes in absolute terpene concentrations occurred with MeJA treatment (but not on proportional terpene concentrations), however, variation in chemistry was mostly explained by differences between clones. We conclude that MeJA can enhance protection against H. abietis and E. polonica, but the extent of protection will depend on the importance of constitutive and induced resistance for the Norway spruce clone in question. Trade-offs among resistances do not necessarily hinder the use of MeJA, as clones that are constitutively more resistant to either pest, should show greater MeJA-induced resistance against the other. 

  • 8.
    Ramos Do Prado, Samira B.
    et al.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Melfi, Paulo R.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Castro Alves, Victor
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Broetto, Sabrina G.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Araújo, Elias S.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    do Nascimento, João R.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center, São Paulo Research Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Fabi, João P.
    Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food and Nutrition Research Center, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Food Research Center, São Paulo Research Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Physiological Degradation of Pectin in Papaya Cell Walls: Release of Long Chains Galacturonans Derived from Insoluble Fractions during Postharvest Fruit Ripening2016In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 7, article id 1120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is a fleshy fruit that presents a rapid pulp softening during ripening. However, the timeline on how papaya pectinases act in polysaccharide solubilization and the consequent modification of the cell wall fractions during ripening is still not clear. In this work, the gene expression correlations between, on one hand, 16 enzymes potentially acting during papaya cell wall disassembling and, on the other hand, the monosaccharide composition of cell wall fractions during papaya ripening were evaluated. In order to explain differences in the ripening of papaya samplings, the molecular mass distribution of polysaccharides from water-soluble and oxalate-soluble fractions (WSF and OSF, respectively), as well as the oligosaccharide profiling from the WSF fraction, were evaluated by high performance size exclusion chromatography coupled to a refractive index detector and high performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled to pulse amperometric detection analyses, respectively. Results showed that up-regulated polygalacturonase and β-galactosidase genes were positively correlated with some monosaccharide profiles. In addition, an overall increase in the retention time of high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) polysaccharides in WSF and OSF was shown. The apparent disappearance of one HMW peak of the OSF may result from the conversion of pectin that were crosslinked with calcium into more soluble forms through the action of PGs, which would increase the solubilization of polysaccharides by lowering their molecular weight. Thus, the results allowed us to propose a detailed process of papaya cell wall disassembling that would affect sensorial properties and post-harvesting losses of this commercially important fruit.

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