oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Casula Vifell, Åsa
    Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Department of Sociology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Soneryd, Linda
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Score, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Score, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Social sustainability requires social sustainability procedural prerequisites for reaching substantive goals2015In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 131-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synergies and trade-offs between the various dimensions of sustainable development are attracting a rising scholarly attention. Departing from the scholarly debate, this article focuses on internal relationships within social sustainability. Our key claim is that it is diffi cult to strengthen substantive social sustainability goals unless there are key elements of social sustainability contained in the very procedures intended to work toward sustainability. Our analysis, informed by an organizing perspective, is based on a set of case studies on multi-stakeholder transnational sustainability projects (sustainability standards). This article explores six challenges related to the achievement of such procedures that can facilitate substantive social sustainability. Three of these concern the formulation of standards and policies, and three the implementation of standards and policies. To achieve substantive social sustainability procedures must be set in motion with abilities to take hold of people's concerns, frames, resources, as well as existing relevant institutions and infrastructures.

  • 2.
    Fransson, Anna-Lisa Sayuli
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Tragedy or Chivalrous Romance?: The Swedish Government and the Baltic Sea Pipeline2014In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 266-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When Sweden was confronted with the idea of building a gas pipeline through the Baltic Sea, the Swedish government found itself in a paradoxical situation. Should it give in to strong foreign interests and abandon its proudly held line of environmental policy, or stick to its profile at the risk of earning a powerful adversary? This narrative analysis, building on the government's official narratives, explains how and why the self-proclaimed environmental guardian of the sea ended up having it both ways. By using strategies of depoliticization, polarization, and parallel storytelling, the Swedish government surrendered narrative power to its antagonist, alternated between incompatible views of its own political capability, and added a happy ending to the pipeline tragedy. These strategies enabled the government to make an environmentally controversial decision without losing prestige or abandoning its ethical profile regarding the Baltic Sea.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Boundary work, hybrid practices and portable representations: an analysis of global and national co-productions of Red Lists2013In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 30-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many countries, the IUCN Red List of threatened species is a central instrument in their work to counteract loss of biodiversity. This article analyzes the development of the Red List categories and criteria, how these categories and criteria are used in the construction of global, national, and regional red lists, and how the red lists are employed in policy work. A central finding of the article is that this mix of actors implies many different forms of boundary work. This article also finds that the Red List functions as a portable representation, that is, a context-independent instrument to represent nature. A third finding is that the Red List functions as a link between experts and policy makers. Thus, the Red List is best understood as a boundary object and hybrid practice where the credibility of scientific assessment and a specific policy is mutually strengthened

  • 4.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Regulating nature: public understanding and moral reasoning2011In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 149-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes public understanding and moral reasoning with regard to regulating nature, specifically, societal efforts to control an insect population. It presents a study of a Swedish case in which a biological insecticide has been used to fight mosquitoes to reduce the nuisance to the local population. This case involves conflicting values regarding environmental protection. People's right to outdoor life is placed in opposition to long-term risks to biodiversity. Through interviews with local residents, their deliberations on the spraying are analyzed, particularly concerning to what extent and how they describe the situation in moral terms, but also how they acknowledge and use scientific findings in their argumentation.

  • 5.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Science and Technology Studies in the Department of Sociology and Work Science at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Environmental Expertise as Group Belonging: Environmental Sociology Meets Science and Technology Studies2018In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 309-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is environmental expertise? The background to this question is that many scholars consider environmental expertise crucial for discovering, diagnosing, and solving environmental problems but do not discuss in any depth what constitutes expertise. By investigating the meaning and use of the concept of expertise in three general theories within environmental sociology—the treadmill of production, risk society, and ecological modernization—and findings from science and technology studies (STS), this article develops a sociological understanding of environmental expertise: what it is and how it is acquired. Environmental expertise is namely about group belonging and professional socialization around specialized skills; that is, it concerns both substantial competence and social recognition. The implications of this general view on expertise are then used to enrich theories in environmental sociology.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf