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  • 1.
    Buitrago, B. Huerta
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Munoz, P. Ferrer
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ribe, V.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Larsson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Engwall, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wojciechowska, E.
    Gdansk University of Technology, Gdansk, Poland.
    Waara, S.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hazard assessment of sediments from a wetland system for treatment of landfill leachate using bioassays2013In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 97, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four bioassays were used in this study for the hazard assessment of sediments from sediment traps and several ponds in a treatment wetland for landfill leachate at Atleverket, Sweden. In the 6-day solid phase microbiotest with the sediment-dwelling crustacean Heterocypris incongruens both acute and chronic effects were observed with a gradual decrease and loss of toxicity with treatment in the wetland system. Some samples showed a low toxicity in porewater and only one sample was weakly toxic in the whole sediment test when assessed with Aliivibrio fischeri (Vibro fischeri). No genotoxicity was detected in the umu test. The toxicity response in the H4IIE- luc test evaluating the presence of dioxin-like compounds was considerably higher in the samples from the sediment traps. The hazard of the sediment therefore appears to be highest in the sediment traps and pond 1 with the methods employed. The result indicates that the wetland system has a design supporting the concentration and sequestration of toxic substances in the first part of the wetland. Based upon the results we suggest that hazard assessment of sediments from other treatment wetlands for landfill leachate should be conducted. (c) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Desale, Prithviraj
    et al.
    Dr DY Patil Biotechnol & Bioinformat Inst, Dr DY Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Kashyap, Deboleena
    Dr DY Patil Biotechnol & Bioinformat Inst, Dr DY Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Nawani, Neelu
    Dr DY Patil Biotechnol & Bioinformat Inst, Dr DY Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Nahar, Noor
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Rahman, Aminur
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kapadnis, Balasaheb
    Dept Microbiol, Univ Pune, Pune, India.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Biosorption of nickel by Lysinibacillus sp BA2 native to bauxite mine2014In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 107, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current scenario of environmental pollution urges the need for an effective solution for toxic heavy metal removal from industrial wastewater. Bioremediation is the most cost effective process employed by the use of microbes especially bacteria resistant to toxic metals. In this study, Lysinibacillus sp. BA2, a nickel tolerant strain isolated from bauxite mine was used for the biosorption of Ni(II). Lysinibacillus sp. BA2 biomass had isoelectric point (pI) of 3.3. The maximum negative zeta potential value (-39.45) was obtained at pH 6.0 which was highly favourable for Ni(II) biosorption. 238.04 mg of Ni(II) adsorbed on one gram of dead biomass and 196.32 mg adsorbed on one gram of live biomass. The adsorption of Ni(II) on biomass increased with time and attained saturation after 180 mm with rapid biosorption in initial 30 min. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms could fit well for biosorption of Ni(II) by dead biomass while Langmuir isotherm provided a better fit for live biomass based on correlation coefficient values. The kinetic studies of Ni(II) removal, using dead and live biomass was well explained by second-order kinetic model. Ni(II) adsorption on live biomass was confirrned by SEM-EDX where cell aggregation and increasing irregularity of cell morphology was observed even though cells were in non-growing state. The FTIR analysis of biomass revealed the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups, which seem responsible for biosorption of Ni(II). The beads made using dead biomass of Lysinibacillus sp. BA2 could efficiently remove Ni(II) from effluent solutions. These microbial cells can substitute expensive methods for treating nickel contaminated industrial wastewaters.

  • 3.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Musse, Ayan Au
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wigh, Viktoria
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Cecilia
    School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Engwall, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Scherbak, Nikolai
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Effect of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) on the liver lipid metabolism of the developing chicken embryo2019In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 170, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is a well-known contaminant in the environment and it has shown to disrupt multiple biological pathways, particularly those related with lipid metabolism. In this study, we have studied the impact of in ovo exposure to PFOS on lipid metabolism in livers in developing chicken embryos using lipidomics for detailed characterization of the liver lipidome. We used an avian model (Gallus gallus domesticus) for in ovo treatment at two levels of PFOS. The lipid profile of the liver of the embryo was investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography combined with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Over 170 lipids were identified, covering phospholipids, ceramides, di- and triacylglycerols, cholesterol esters and fatty acid composition of the lipids. The PFOS exposure caused dose dependent changes in the lipid levels, which included upregulation of specific phospholipids associated with the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway, triacylglycerols with low carbon number and double bond count as well as of lipotoxic ceramides and diacylglycerols. Our data suggest that at lower levels of exposure, mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation is suppressed while the peroxisomal fatty acid β -oxidation is increased. At higher doses, however, both β -oxidation pathways are upregulated.

  • 4.
    Li, Hongcheng
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhou, Qunfang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wu, Yuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Effects of waterborne nano-iron on medaka (Oryzias latipes): antioxidant enzymatic activity, lipid peroxidation and histopathology2009In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 684-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toxicity tests were performed to investigate possible harmful effects on medaka exposed to nano-iron. Dose-dependent decreases of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and increases of malondialdehyde (MDA) were induced in the medaka embryo, suggesting that oxidative damage was induced by nano-iron. For adult medaka, the disturbance of antioxidative balance was observed during the early exposure period based on the monitoring of the hepatic and cerebral SOD and reduced glutathione (GSH). No terminal oxidative damage occurred during the whole exposure period, probably due to the high self-recovering capability of the adult fish. Some histopathological and morphological alterations (cell swelling, hyperplasia, and granulomas, etc.) were observed in gill and intestine tissues, which confirmed that deleterious effects occurred as a result of direct contact with nano-iron. It is suggested that further evaluation should be made concerning the risk assessment of waterborne nano-iron on aquatic life.

  • 5.
    Liu, Guorui
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085, China; College of Resources and Environment, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Falandysz, Jerzy
    Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, University of Gdańsk, 80-308, Gdańsk, Poland; Environmental and Computational Chemistry Group, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zaragocilla Campus, University of Cartagena, Cartagena, Colombia.
    Toxicology and Environmental Characteristics of emerging pollutants2019In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 181, p. 264-264Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Meyer-Alert, Henriette
    et al.
    Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, ABBt - Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    Larsson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hollert, Henner
    Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research, ABBt - Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
    Keiter, Steffen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Benzo[a]pyrene and 2,3-benzofuran induce divergent temporal patterns of AhR-regulated responses in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio)2019In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 183, article id UNSP 109505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biotests like the fish embryo toxicity test have become increasingly popular in risk assessment and evaluation of chemicals found in the environment. The large range of possible endpoints is a big advantage when researching on the mode of action of a certain substance. Here, we utilized the frequently used model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio) to examine regulative mechanisms in the pathway of the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in early development. We exposed embryos to representatives of two chemical classes known to elicit dioxin-like activity: benzo[a]pyrene for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 2,3-benzofuran for polar O-substituted heterocycles as a member of heterocyclic compounds in general (N-, S-, O-heterocycles; NSO-hets). We measured gene transcription of the induced P450 cytochromes (cyp1), their formation of protein and biotransformation activity throughout the whole embryonic development until 5 days after fertilization. The results show a very specific time course of transcription depending on the chemical properties (e.g. halogenation, planarity, Kow), the physical decay and the biodegradability of the tested compound. However, although this temporal pattern was not precisely transferable onto the protein level, significant regulation in enzymatic activity over time could be detected. We conclude, that a careful choice of time and end point as well as consideration of the chemical properties of a substance are fairly important when planning, conducting and especially evaluating biotests.

  • 7.
    Yeung, Leo W. Y.
    et al.
    Pathology and Pathophysiology Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Japan; Potential Pollutants Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan; Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto ON, Canada.
    Guruge, Keerthi S.
    Pathology and Pathophysiology Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Taniyasu, Sachi
    Potential Pollutants Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi
    Potential Pollutants Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Angus, Peter W.
    Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg VIC, Australia; Victorian Liver Transplant Unit, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Austin Health, Heidelberg VIC, Australia; Department of Medicine, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg VIC, Australia.
    Herath, Chandana B.
    Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg VIC, Australia.
    Profiles of perfluoroalkyl substances in the liver and serum of patients with liver cancer and cirrhosis in Australia2013In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 96, p. 139-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present cross-sectional study investigated 12 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in serum (n=79) and liver (n=66) samples from patients who had undergone liver transplantation for a range of conditions, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis C viral infection (HCV), both HCC and HCV, amyloidosis or acute liver failure. PFAS data from patients were compared to those in control serum (n=25) samples from liver donors with no known liver disease and to those in control liver (n=9) tissues collected during liver resection surgery. All samples showed detectable PFOS (serum: 0.621-126. ng/mL; liver: 0.375-42.5. ng/g wet wt) and PFOA (serum: 0.437-45.5. ng/mL; liver: 0.101-2.25. ng/g wet wt) concentrations. In general, in paired serum and liver samples, serum had higher PFOS, PFHxS, PFDA, PFNA, and PFOA concentrations than those in explanted livers from patients. These findings also suggest that pathological changes in diseased livers alter the distribution of PFASs between liver and serum. The results from control serum (2007-2008) suggested that PFOS, PFHxS, PFOA, and PFNA concentrations were lower than those previously reported from Australia for 2002-2003, and 2006-2007. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, the detection and comparison of a range of PFASs in the liver of patients with liver cancer and/or liver cirrhosis.

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