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  • 1.
    Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Perelló, Gemma
    Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Institut d’Investigacions Sanitàries Pere Virgili, “Rovira i Virgili” University, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Spain.
    Llebaria, Xavier
    Health Protection Agency, Department of Health, Generalitat de Catalunya, Roc Boronat 81-95, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bigas, Esther
    Health Protection Agency, Department of Health, Generalitat de Catalunya, Roc Boronat 81-95, Barcelona, Spain.
    Martí-Cid, Roser
    Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Institut d’Investigacions Sanitàries Pere Virgili, “Rovira i Virgili” University, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Spain.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Domingo, José L.
    Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Institut d’Investigacions Sanitàries Pere Virgili, “Rovira i Virgili” University, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Spain.
    Exposure to perfluorinated compounds in Catalonia, Spain, through consumption of various raw and cooked foodstuffs, including packaged food2009In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 1577-1583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the role that some food processing and packaging might play as a source of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) through the diet was assessed. The levels of PFCs were determined in composite samples of veal steak (raw, grilled, and fried), pork loin (raw, grilled, and fried), chicken breast (raw, grilled, and fried), black pudding (uncooked), liver lamb (raw), marinated salmon (home-made and packaged), lettuce (fresh and packaged), pate of pork liver, foie gras of duck, frankfurt, sausages, chicken nuggets (fried), and common salt. Among the 11 PFCs analyzed, only PFHxS, PFOS, PFHxA, and PFOA were detected in at least one composite sample, while the levels of the remaining PFCs (PFBuS, PFHpA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA, and PFDoDA) were under their respective detection limits. PFOS was the compound most frequently detected, being found in 8 of the 20 food items analyzed, while PFHxA was detected in samples of raw veal, chicken nuggets, frankfurt, sausages, and packaged lettuce. According to the results of the present study, it is not sufficiently clear if cooking with non-stick cookware, or packaging some foods, could contribute to a higher human exposure to PFCs.

  • 2.
    Mariscal-Arcas, M.
    et al.
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
    Rivas, A.
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
    Granada, A.
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
    Monteagudo, Celia
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
    Murcia, M. A.
    Department of Food Technology, Nutrition and Food Science, University of Murcia, Spain.
    Olea-Serrano, F.
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Campus de Cartuja s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain.
    Dietary exposure assessment of pregnant women to bisphenol-A from cans and microwave containers in Southern Spain2009In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 506-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), material for polycarbonate and epoxy resin synthesis, has been detected in canned food, among other food containers. In mammal studies, BPA transferred from mother to fetus, caused abnormality of reproductive organs, and advanced female puberty. BPA from canned food and microwave containers was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Population was cohort of mother-son pairs established at Granada University Hospital. Frequency of food consumption (including canned food) was studied with a semi-quantitative questionnaire. The most frequently consumed products were fish and juice cans, consumed 1-3 times/week by 34.7% and 22.3% of the study population, respectively. The women made little use of polymer microwave containers, 52.8% never using them and 45.9% using them <3 times/month. Estimated mean (standard deviation) intake of BPA was 1.1(0.839) microgram/day. No relationship was found between BPA exposure and maternal socio-demographic variables or newborn characteristics. This study offers the first estimate of BPA dietary intake by pregnant women in Southern Spain. The consumption of canned foods and drinks by these women means that their exposure was lower than EFSA estimates for the European population. Nevertheless it remains of concern, given the proven undesirable effects of low-level exposure and higher susceptibility of pregnant women.

  • 3.
    Rivas, Ana
    et al.
    Research Group on Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment-AGR255, Nutrition and Food Science Department, University of Granada Cartuja, Granada, Spain.
    Monteagudo, Celia
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Research Group on Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment-AGR255, Nutrition and Food Science Department, University of Granada Cartuja, Granada, Spain.
    Heras-Gonzalez, Leticia
    Research Group on Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment-AGR255, Nutrition and Food Science Department, University of Granada Cartuja, Granada, Spain.
    Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel
    Research Group on Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment-AGR255, Nutrition and Food Science Department, University of Granada Cartuja, Granada, Spain; Food Technology, Nutrition and Food Science Department, University of Murcia Espinardo, Murcia, Spain.
    Lorenzo-Tovar, Maria Luisa
    Research Group on Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment-AGR255, Nutrition and Food Science Department, University of Granada Cartuja, Granada, Spain.
    Olea-Serrano, Fátima
    Research Group on Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment-AGR255, Nutrition and Food Science Department, University of Granada Cartuja, Granada, Spain.
    Association of bisphenol A exposure with dietary quality indices in Spanish schoolchildren2016In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 94, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young children, whose growth and development are highly dependent on the endocrine system, are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruptor exposure. The main objectives of this study were to measure BPA migration levels from cans, fruit juice bottles/packs, and microwave containers used for food/drinks consumed by a sample of 6- to 8-year old schoolchildren in Spain and to estimate the relationship between their resulting BPA exposure and diet quality index scores (Mediterranean Diet Score and Breakfast Quality Index). The mean BPA concentration was 11.8 ng/mL for vegetable cans, 22.1 ng/mL for pulse cans, 3.6 ng/mL for juice bottles/packs, and 1.2 ng/mL for microwave containers. Results revealed a significant association between the Mediterranean Diet Score and low BPA exposure of the children. BPA exposure below the median level was significantly associated with a higher score in both the first-grade (P = 0.030) and second-grade (p = 0.0001) groups. However, no association was found between BPA exposure and the Breakfast Quality Index. In conclusion, children with a stronger adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet appear to be less exposed to BPA migrating from food packaging and microwave containers. Further research is warranted on the inadvertent exposure of children to endocrinedisrupting chemicals from these sources.

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