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  • 1.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Book review: Social and caring professions in European welfare states: Policies, services and professional practices2019In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 199-201Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cater, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway.
    Children exposed to domestic violence: a discussion about research ethics and researchers’ responsibilities2014In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 67-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s exposure to domestic violence has attracted increased interest from researchers. This greater interest necessitates discussion about the methods by which children’s exposure to and descriptions of violence are studied. This article (1) discusses ethical dilemmas in research involving interviewing children exposed to domestic violence in relation to constructions of children as competent and as vulnerable, and (2) suggests a conceptual framework to aid in the design of such studies. The ethical dilemmas discussed concern: (1) research being ethically justified, (2) consent and (3) confidentiality and unsought disclosures. We suggest that combining children’s rights to agency and protection in ethical research that involves interviewing children exposed to violence can be facilitated by using the concepts of closeness and distance.

  • 3.
    Degner, Jürgen
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Henriksen, Anna
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Ahonen, Lia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. The Life History Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, USA.
    Oscarsson, Lars
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Young residents’ view of support persons’ involvement in the institutional treatment programme: a one-year follow-up2015In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many youths placed in residential treatment centres (RTCs) have prior to placement had contact with professional and non-professional support persons (SPs). By interviewing 46 youths (residents) from 10 Swedish RTCs, the present study aims to investigate the residents' view of their relationship with SPs, and, in a one-year follow-up, explore obstacles to or possibilities for maintaining the relationship during the stay at the facility. Results show that 20 residents consider the SPs to be significant adults with an emotional involvement component; seven residents describe their SP as having an instrumental involvement attitude, while 19 residents did not report any significant SP at all. Several obstacles and a few possibilities for involving the SPs were found in the one-year follow-up. Both obstacles and possibilities mainly concerned the willingness of facility staff, and in some cases the social welfare agency staff, to encourage SP involvement. A more systematic SP involvement procedure is needed at the RTC, as well as on the part of the handling officer in the social service agency. Further, it is important that when new residents arrive, staff should make an inventory of important

  • 4.
    Hämberg, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Socialt arbete, Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Sedelius, Thomas
    Statsvetenskap, Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Inspection of social services in Sweden: a comparative analysis of the use and adjustment of standards2016In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 138-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspection has increasingly been regarded as a safeguard for promoting quality of social services. Little attention has, however, been given to the impact of standards used in inspections, i.e. the written norms, rules and principles used for identification and judgment. The aim of this study is to empirically contribute to an improved understanding of how standards in inspection of social service are designed, and to what extent the design is adjusted in relation to different kind of social services. We employ a systematic and comparative analysis of the content (in terms of input, process, output and outcome aspects) and precision (low, medium and high) of 186 paragraphs derived from legislation and referred to as standards in inspection decisions concerning two types of social work: Investigation, Assessment and Decision-Making (IAD); and Treatment Intervention (TI) in Sweden 2012. Contrary to expectations based on an inspection ideal, our findings show that paragraphs covering outcome aspects are not more commonly referred to as standards in TI than in IAD inspection. The analysis of the precision also indicates that the standards used in inspection of TI are not more adjusted to complex and subjectively experienced aspects than are the standards used in IAD. Our overall results indicate that the policy instrument is primarily adapted to IAD inspection rather than to TI inspection.

  • 5.
    Jönsson, Jessica H.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work, Östersund, Sweden.
    Social work beyond cultural otherisation2013In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalisation, increasing inequalities and marginalisation create new challenges for social work as a global profession and research arena. The recent global socio-economic and structural transformations have reinforced otherisation of non-western peoples and the use of the old colonial discursive repertoire of ‘Us’ and ‘Them’. This paper argues that culturalisation of social problems creates obstacles for the development of new methods and practices in social work.

  • 6.
    Thunberg, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ahonen, Lia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA.
    Degner, Jürgen
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Crime victims in limbo: the importance of collaboration between the municipal social services and victim support organisations2016In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming a victim of crime can be a traumatic experience, which calls for post-victimisation psychosocial support. In Sweden, this kind of support is offered by both governmental, for example, municipal social services (MSS), and nongovernmental organisations such as Victim Support (VS). The present study investigates (a) how many municipalities have a written agreement to collaborate with other organisations, and what kind of services they offer within their own organisation, (b) if there are differences between what support the MSS offer to victims depending on collaboration and (c) how do MSS staff, VS staff and crime victims describe the actual collaboration and support? Publicly available information from the National Board of Health and Welfare was analysed, in addition to a case study of three municipalities’ work with victims of crime. The case study consists of nine interviews with social workers from MSS, crime victim coordinators from VS and crime victims. The results from the survey indicate that collaboration between the MSS and VS is occurring in some municipalities to access missing competence or to outsource services from the MSS. However, results show that collaboration does not exist in every municipality, and one reason for this, according to interview information, is to protect the confidentiality of the clients. The challenges and advantages of collaboration between the MSS and VS are discussed together with practical implications for the crime victim field.

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