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  • 1.
    Asnake, Solomon
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pradhan, Ajay
    Biology, The Life Science Center, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Modig, Carina
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Olsson, Per-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    The brominated flame retardants TBP-AE and TBP-DBPE antagonize the chicken androgen receptor and act as potential endocrine disrupters in chicken LMH cells2015In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 1993-2000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased exposure of birds to endocrine disrupting compounds has resulted in developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. We have recently identified the flame retardants, ally1-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-AE), 2-3-dibromopropy1-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE) and the TBP-DBPE metabolite 2-bromoallyI-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-BAE) as antagonists to both the human androgen receptor (AR) and the zebrafish AR. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether these compounds also interact with the chicken AR. In silico modeling studies showed that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE were able to dock into to the chicken AR ligand-binding pocket. In vitro transfection assays revealed that all three brominated compounds acted as chicken AR antagonists, inhibiting testosterone induced AR activation. In addition, qRT-PCR studies confirmed that they act as AR antagonists and demonstrated that they also alter gene expression patterns of apoptotic, anti-apoptotic, drug metabolizing and amino acid transporter genes. These studies, using chicken LMH cells, suggest that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE are potential endocrine disrupters in chicken.

  • 2.
    Ljungberg, Liza U.
    et al.
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Persson, Karin
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Andreas C
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Green, Henrik
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, Division of Gene Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Solna, Sweden.
    Whiss, Per A
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Effects of nicotine, its metabolites and tobacco extracts on human platelet function in vitro2013In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 932-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular effects of smoking are probably multifactorial, including effects on platelets. Previous reports investigating the effects of nicotine and tobacco on platelet function are inconsistent. The present study investigated in vitro effects of nicotine, its major metabolites, tobacco extracts and extract of tobacco-free snuff on human platelets. None of the metabolites cotinine, cotinine-N-oxide, nicotine-1'-N-oxide or trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (0.1-10 μM) affected platelet aggregation or P-selectin expression. Nicotine (10 μM) weakly increased platelet aggregation, whereas trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (0.1 μM) and nicotine-1'-N-oxide (1-10 μM) weakly inhibited adhesion to fibrinogen. To elucidate the influence of other tobacco compounds, we investigated the impact of moist tobacco and smoke extracts on platelet function. Filtered extracts of oral snuff, cigarette smoke and tobacco free snuff inhibited platelet adhesion concentration-dependently. The inhibitory effects of tobacco extracts on platelet adhesion were independent of nicotine content and the nitric-oxide-pathway and not mediated through a platelet-nicotine-receptor. Taken together, tobacco extracts inhibit platelet activation during short-term in vitro challenge. As only limited effects of nicotine and nicotine metabolites were seen, the tobacco-induced platelet inhibition are likely induced by other compounds present in tobacco and tobacco free snuff.

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