oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bour, Agathe
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Haarr, Ane
    Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Keiter, Steffen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hylland, Ketil
    Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Environmentally relevant microplastic exposure affects sediment-dwelling bivalves2018In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 236, p. 652-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most microplastics are expected to sink and end up in marine sediments. However, very little is known concerning their potential impact on sediment-dwelling organisms. We studied the long-term impact of microplastic exposure on two sediment-dwelling bivalve species. Ennucula tenuis and Abra nitida were exposed to polyethylene microparticles at three concentrations (1; 10 and 25 mg/kg of sediment) for four weeks. Three size classes (4-6; 20-25 and 125-500 mu m) were used to study the influence of size on microplastic ecotoxicity. Microplastic exposure did not affect survival, condition index or burrowing behaviour in either bivalve species. However, significant changes in energy reserves were observed. No changes were observed in protein, carbohydrate or lipid contents in E. tenuis, with the exception of a decrease in lipid content for one condition. However, total energy decreased in a dose-dependent manner for bivalves exposed to the largest particles. To the contrary, no significant changes in total energy were observed for A. nitida, although a significant decrease of protein content was observed for individuals exposed to the largest particles, at all concentrations. Concentration and particle size significantly influenced microplastic impacts on bivalves, the largest particles and higher concentrations leading to more severe effects. Several hypotheses are presented to explain the observed modulation of energy reserves, including the influence of microplastic size and concentration. Our results suggest that long-term exposure to microplastics at environmentally relevant concentrations can impact marine benthic biota.

  • 2.
    Breivik, Knut
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Kjeller, Norway.
    Alcock, Ruth
    Environmental Research Solutions, Witherslack, Cumbria, UK.
    Li, Yi-Fan
    Meteorological Service of Canada, Downsview, ON, Canada.
    Bailey, Robert E.
    Bailey Associates, Midland, USA.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    UNEP Chemicals, Châtelaine (GE), Switzerland.
    Pacyna, Jozef M.
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Kjeller, Norway.
    Primary sources of selected POPs: regional and global scale emission inventories2004In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 128, no 1-2, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, a number of studies have been devoted to the sources and emissions of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) at regional and global scales. While significant improvements in knowledge have been achieved for some pesticides, the quantitative understanding of the emission processes and emission patterns for "non-pesticide" POPs are still considered limited. The key issues remaining for the non-pesticide POPs are in part determined by their general source classification. For industrial chemicals, such as the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), there is considerable uncertainty with respect to the relative importance of atmospheric emissions from various source categories. For PCBs, temperature is discussed as a potential key factor influencing atmospheric emission levels and patterns. When it comes to the unintentional by-products of combustion and industrial processes (PCDD/Fs), there is still a large uncertainty with respect to the relative contribution of emissions from unregulated sources such as backyard barrel burning that requires further consideration and characterisation. For hexachlorobenzene (HCB), the relative importance of primary and secondary atmospheric emissions in controlling current atmospheric concentrations remains one of the key uncertainties. While these and other issues may remain unresolved, knowledge concerning the emissions of POPs is a prerequisite for any attempt to understand and predict the distribution and fate of these chemicals on a regional and global scale as well as to efficiently minimise future environmental burdens.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mueller, Jochen F.
    Entox, Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences, The University of Queensland, Coopers Plains, Australia.
    Toms, Leisa-Maree L.
    School of Public Health and Social Work and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia.
    Hobson, Peter
    Sullivan and Nicolaides Pathology, Taringa, Australia.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Temporal trends of PFSAs, PFCAs and selected precursors in Australian serum from 2002 to 20132017In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 220, no Pt A, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a family of compounds that includes numerous compound classes. To date, only a subset of these PFASs have been studied thoroughly in the general population. In this study, pooled serum samples from Australia collected in 2002-2013 were analyzed for PFASs according to gender and age (age categories of 0-4 years, 5-15 years, 16-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 years, and >60 years), in total 54 pooled samples and 4920 individuals. Compound classes included were perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs), and two groups of PFCA precursor compounds; polyfluoroalkyl phosphate diesters (diPAPs), and fluorotelomer sulfonic acids (FTSAs). Several PFASs that were not reported in previous studies of Australian serum samples were found in this sample set including; diPAPs, FTSAs, perfluoropentane sulfonic acid (PFPeS), perfluoroheptane sulfonic acid (PFHpS), perfluoroheptane carboxylic acid (PFHpA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoDA), and perfluorotridecanoic acid (PFTrDA). Various temporal trends were observed with a significant reduction (p < 0.05) between 2002 and 2013 for 8:2 FTSA, perflurohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), PFHpS, PFOS, and perflurooctanoic acid (PFOA). Levels of longer-chained PFDA and PFUnDA started to decrease more recently, between 2006 and 2013, while PFDoDA increased during the same time period. Higher levels in younger age groups (0-4 and 5-15 years) compared to adults (>15 years) were found for 8:2 FTSA and PFHpA, while levels of PFHpS, PFOS, PFUnDA, PFDoDA and PFTrDA were higher in adult age groups compared to younger age groups. Gender-specific patterns were seen for PFOA, PFHxS, PFHpS and PFOS, where levels were lower in women. Changes in manufacturing processes were reflected in the temporal time trends, and differences in bioaccumulation potential between homologues could be associated with age trends. Our results emphasize the importance of including emerging classes of PFASs in biomonitoring studies.

  • 4. Fuglei, E.
    et al.
    Bustnes, J. O.
    Hop, H.
    Mørk, T.
    Björnfoth, Helen
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Environmental contaminants in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) in Svalbard: relationships with feeding ecology and body condition2007In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 146, no 1, p. 128-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adipose tissues from 20 arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) of both sexes from Svalbard were analysed for polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDE), chlordane, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) concentrations. Gender (0.43<p<0.97) and age (0.15<p<0.95) were not significantly related to any of the organohalogen groups. Body condition showed a significant inverse relationship with SigmaPBDE, SigmaChlordane and HCB, suggesting that increased tissue contaminant concentrations are associated with depletion of adipose tissue. The seasonal cyclic storage and mobilisation of adipose tissue, characteristic in Arctic wildlife, may then provide increased input of contaminants to sensitive, vital effect organs. Trophic position was estimated by delta(15)N from muscle samples and showed significantly positive relationship with all contaminants, with the exception of HCB concentrations. This indicates that foxes feeding at high trophic levels had higher tissue contaminant levels as a result of bioaccumulation in the food chain.

  • 5.
    Gong, Wenwen
    et al.
    School of Environment, Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. School of Environment, Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Xiaotu
    School of Environment, Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Bin
    School of Environment, Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Gang
    School of Environment, Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
    Emission factors of unintentional HCB and PeCBz and their correlation with PCDD/PCDF2017In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 230, p. 516-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCBz) have been listed as unintentional POPs in the annex of the Stockholm Convention and thus, attracted attention by government and researchers. Since the intentional production and use has ceased in most countries, the unintentional releases to the environment have increased. This study gathered 206 and 78 emission factors (EFs) of unintentional HCB and PeCBz from scientific publications and governmental reports, respectively. Most of the EFs referred to the release vector "air" (EFAir) and to a less extent to "product" (EFProduct). EFs were proposed for different source categories/classes used in the Toolkit according to the technologies that released the HCB or PeCBz. Overall, lowest and highest EFAir for HCB were found in the metallurgical industry range from 1 μg/t in well controlled plants (coke, iron and steel) up to 40,000 μg/t (secondary zinc). EFs for PeCBz were in similar order of magnitude. Due to lack of data, EFs to water, land or residue cannot be proposed. Using linear regression and statistical analysis such as Pearson correlation, we found strongest correlation of EFAir between HCB and PeCBz (R(2) = 0.79, P < 0.01) and weaker, but still significant, correlations for EFAir between PCDD/PCDFTEQ and HCB (R(2) = 0.56; P < 0.01) or PeCBz (R(2) = 0.31 P < 0.01) for various thermal processes.

  • 6.
    Guo, Jianqiu
    et al.
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Zhang, Jiming
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Wu, Chunhua
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Lv, Shenliang
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Lu, Dasheng
    Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China.
    Qi, Xiaojuan
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China;Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou, China.
    Jiang, Shuai
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Feng, Chao
    Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China.
    Yu, Haixing
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Liang, Weijiu
    Changning District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China.
    Chang, Xiuli
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Zhang, Yubin
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Xu, Hao
    Changning District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Guoquan
    Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China.
    Zhou, Zhijun
    School of Public Health/ Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education/ Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment of National Health Commission, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Associations of prenatal and childhood chlorpyrifos exposure with Neurodevelopment of 3-year-old children2019In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 251, p. 538-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organophosphate insecticide, has been linked to adverse neurodevelopmental effects in animal studies. However, little is known about long-term neurotoxicity of early-life CPF exposure in humans. We aimed to evaluate the associations of both prenatal and early childhood CPF exposure with neurodevelopment of children. In this observational study based on Sheyang Mini Birth Cohort, pregnant women were recruited from an agricultural region between June 2009 and January 2010, and their children were followed up from birth to age three. Urinary 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), a specific metabolite of CPF, was quantified using large-volume-injection gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Developmental quotients (DQs) of children in motor, adaptive, language, and social areas were assessed by trained pediatricians. Data from 377 mother-child pairs were used in the current study. Associations between CPF exposure and neurodevelopmental indicators were estimated using generalized linear models with adjustment for potential confounders. The median concentrations of TCPy in maternal and children's urine were 5.39 mu g/L and 5.34 mu g/L, respectively. No statistically significant association was found between maternal urinary TCPy concentrations and children neurodevelopment. While for postnatal exposure, we found lower motor area DQ score 0.61 [95% confidence interval (CI): -1.13, -0.09; p = 0.02] and social area DQ score 0.55 (95% CI: -1.07, -0.03; p = 0.04) per one-unit increase in the In-transformed childhood urinary TCPy concentrations. Further stratification by sex indicated that the inverse associations were only observed in boys, but not in girls. Our findings suggest that adverse neurodevelopmental effects were associated with early childhood CPF exposure, but not prenatal exposure. Additional longitudinal studies are needed to replicate these results and to further understand the toxicological mechanisms of CPF.

  • 7.
    Hao, Yanfen
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Yingming
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Han, Xu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Yang, Ruiqiang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Xiao, Ke
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Wenjuan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Lu, Huili
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Shi, Jianbo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Air monitoring of polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and organochlorine pesticides in West Antarctica during 2011-2017: Concentrations, temporal trends and potential sources2019In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 249, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Annual air samples were collected at various sites in the Fildes Peninsula, West Antarctica from December 2010 to January 2018 using XAD-2 resin passive air samplers to investigate concentrations, temporal trends and potential sources of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic air. Relatively low concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Σ19PCBs: 1.5-29.7 pg/m3), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (Σ12PBDEs: 0.2-2.9 pg/m3) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) (Σ13OCPs: 101-278 pg/m3) were found in the atmosphere of West Antarctica. PCB-11, BDE-47 and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were the predominant compounds in the atmosphere. The concentrations of PCBs, HCHs, DDTs and endosulfans were found to show decreasing temporal trends, whereas uniform temporal trends were observed for HCB. The atmospheric half-life values for PCBs, HCHs, DDTs and endosulfans in Antarctic air were estimated for the first time, using regressions of the natural logarithm of the concentrations versus the number of years, obtaining the values of 2.0, 2.0, 2.4 and 1.2 year, respectively. An increasing ratio of α-HCH/γ-HCH indicated long residence time for α-HCH and possible transformation of γ-HCH to α-HCH in the atmosphere. The ratios of p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE were mostly lower than unity in this study, which could be attributed to aged sources. It was found that long-range atmospheric transport was still considered to be the main contributing factor to the atmospheric levels of the POPs in West Antarctica whereas the contribution of human activities at the Chinese Great Wall Station was minor. The results of this study give a view on the most recent temporal trends and provide new insights regarding the occurrence of various POPs in the Antarctic atmosphere.

  • 8.
    Henriksson, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hagberg, Jessika
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Persson, I.
    Lindström, Gunilla
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Assessment of PCDD/Fs levels in soil at a contaminated sawmill site in Sweden: a GIS and PCA approach to interpret the contamination pattern and distribution2013In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 180, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-furans (PCDD/Fs) were analysed in soil from a Swedish sawmill site where chlorophenols (CPs) had been used more than 40 years ago. The most contaminated area at the site was the preservation subarea where the PCDD/F WHO2005-TEQ level was 3450 times higher than the current Swedish guideline value of 200 ng TEQ/kg soil for land for industrial use. It was also shown that a fire which destroyed the sawmill might have affected the congener distribution at the concerned areas. To get a broader picture of the contamination both GIS (spatial interpolation analysis) and multivariate data analysis (PCA) were applied to visualize and compare PCDD/F levels as well as congener distributions at different areas at the site. It is shown that GIS and PCA are powerful tools in decisions on future investigations, risk assessments and remediation of contaminated sites.

  • 9.
    Jiao, Liping
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong; Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fijian, China; Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fujian, China.
    Zheng, Gene J.
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong;Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Minh, Tu Binh
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Richardson, Bruce
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Chen, Liqi
    Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fijian, China; Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fujian, China.
    Zhang, Yuanhui
    Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fijian, China; Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fujian, China.
    Yeung, Leo W.
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Lam, James C. W.
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Yang, Xulin
    Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fijian, China; Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, Fujian, China.
    Lam, Paul K. S.
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Wong, Ming H.
    Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Persistent toxic substances in remote lake and coastal sediments from Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic: Levels, sources and fluxes2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 4, p. 1342-1351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface sediments from remote lakes and coastal areas from Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Relatively high levels of PAHs were encountered from several lakes from Ny-Ålesund, which were within the range of levels reported for European high mountain lakes and some urban/industrialized areas in the world, pointing to the role of remote Arctic lakes as potential reservoir of semi-volatile organic compounds. Specific patterns of PBDEs were observed, showing higher concentrations of lower brominated compounds such as BDE-7, 17 and 28. Estimated surface sediment fluxes of PAHs in Ny-Ålesund remote lakes were similar to those observed for some European high mountain lakes. The current PAH levels in sediments from three lakes exceeded Canadian sediment quality guidelines, suggesting the presence of possible risks for aquatic organisms and the need for further studies.

  • 10. Knudsen, Lisa B.
    et al.
    Borgå, Katrine
    Jørgensen, Even H.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Schlabach, Martin
    Verreault, Jonathan
    Gabrielsen, Geir W.
    Halogenated organic contaminants and mercury in northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis): levels, relationships to dietary descriptors and blood to liver comparison2007In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 146, no 1, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis) is an interesting candidate for the study of patterns and levels of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) since they accumulate high levels of certain HOCs. In the present study we characterized a suite of established and novel HOCs in northern fulmars breeding on Bjørnøya in the Norwegian Arctic. A comparison between blood and liver HOC levels was made, and the levels were related to the ratios of heavier to lighter stable isotopes of nitrogen (15)N/(14)N (delta(15)N) and carbon (13)C/(12)C (delta(13)C) in muscle. A significant difference in congener patterns between blood and liver was found. The delta(13)C was not related to HOCs, neither in liver nor in blood. Weak correlations were found between delta(15)N and liver HOC levels. The 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) in northern fulmars were well above thresholds for reproductive effects in seabirds.

  • 11.
    Kukucka, Petr
    et al.
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Sánka, Milan
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Holoubek, Ivan
    Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Soil burdens of persistent organic pollutants - Their levels, fate and risk: Part II. Are there any trends in PCDD/F levels in mountain soils?2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 12, p. 3255-3263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Good quality data apt for an assessment of temporal trends of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDDs/Fs) in soils are difficult to obtain since there is a general lack of information on their residues in soils. Variability of soil profiles, non-homogeneity of samples, and often also inconsistency of applied sampling procedures further complicate this problem. To assess spatial and temporal trends of contamination, three soil sampling campaigns have been performed over the period of 12 years at the mountain forest sites in the Czech Republic. Relation between the air, needle and soil contaminations was addressed in addition to time-related variability of soil. It has been confirmed that soil is a good matrix for evaluation of spatial distribution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) but difficult for establishment of temporal trends. A slow rate of the soil-forming processes and their site-specificity was generally the major source of uncertainties.

  • 12.
    Li, Xuemei
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China; Graduate School, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yeung, Leo Wai Yin
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, HK SAR, China; National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Xu, Muqi
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China.
    Taniyasu, Sachi
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Lam, Paul K. S.
    Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, HK SAR, China.
    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Dai, Jiayin
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China.
    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and other fluorochemicals in fish blood collected near the outfall of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing2008In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 156, no 3, p. 1298-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) were measured in zooplankton and five fish species collected from Gaobeidian Lake, which receives discharge from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing, China. The mean total PFCs in five fish were in the order: crucian carp > common carp > leather catfish > white semiknife carp > tilapia. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) occurred at the greatest concentrations, with mean concentrations ranging from 5.74 to 64.2 ng/ml serum. Perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) was the second dominant PFC in fish samples except for common carp in which perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) was dominant. A positive linear relationship (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.05) was observed between ln PFOS concentrations (ln ng/ml) and trophic level (based on δ15N) if tilapia was excluded. The risk assessment showed that PFOS might not pose an immediate risk to fish in Gaobeidian Lake.

  • 13.
    Meng, Mei
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Li, Bing
    Ecological Civilization Construction Committee of Guiyang, Guiyang Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Guiyang, China .
    Shao, Jun-juan
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    He, Bin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Shi, Jian-bo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Ye, Zhi-hong
    State Key Laboratory for Bio-control, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China .
    Jiang, Gui-bin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China .
    Accumulation of total mercury and methylmercury in rice plants collected from different mining areas in China2014In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 184, p. 179-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 155 rice plants were collected from ten mining areas in three provinces of China (Hunan, Guizhou and Guangdong), where most of mercury (Hg) mining takes place in China. During the harvest season, whole rice plants were sampled and divided into root, stalk & leaf, husk and seed (brown rice), together with soil from root zone. Although the degree of Hg contamination varied significantly among different mining areas, rice seed showed the highest ability for methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation. Both concentrations of total mercury (THg) and MeHg in rice plants were significantly correlated with Hg levels in soil, indicating soil is still an important source for both inorganic mercury (IHg) and MeHg in rice plants. The obvious discrepancy between the distribution patterns of THg and MeHg reflected different pathways of IHg and MeHg accumulation. Water soluble Hg may play more important role in MeHg accumulation in rice plants.

  • 14.
    Rotander, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rigét, Frank
    University of Aarhus, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Atli Audunsson, Gudjón
    Innovation Center Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Polder, Anuschka
    Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway .
    Wing Gabrielsen, Geir
    FRAM Centre, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway.
    Vikingsson, Gisli
    Marine Research Institute, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Mikkelsen, Bjarni
    Museum of Natural History, Torshavn, Faroe Islands.
    Dam, Maria
    Environment Agency, Argir, Faroe Islands.
    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in sub-Arctic and Arctic marine mammals, 1986-20092012In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 164, p. 118-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A selection of PCN congeners was analyzed in pooled blubber samples of pilot whale (Globicephala melas), ringed seal (Phoca hispida), minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) and Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), covering a time period of more than 20 years (1986-2009). A large geographical area of the North Atlantic and Arctic areas was covered. PCN congeners 48, 52, 53, 66 and 69 were found in the blubber samples between 0.03 and 5.9 ng/g lw. Also PCBs were analyzed in minke whales and fin whales from Iceland and the total PCN content accounted for 0.2% or less of the total non-planar PCB content. No statistically significant trend in contaminant levels could be established for the studied areas. However, in all species except minke whales caught off Norway the lowest Sigma PCN concentrations were found in samples from the latest sampling period.

  • 15. Routti, Heli
    et al.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Letcher, Robert J.
    Arukwe, Augustine
    Chu, Shaogang
    Gabrielsen, Geir W.
    Concentrations, patterns and metabolites of organochlorine pesticides in relation to xenobiotic phase I and II enzyme activities in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Svalbard and the Baltic Sea2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 8-9, p. 2428-2434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the concentrations and patterns of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their metabolites in liver and plasma of two ringed seal populations (Phoca hispida): lower contaminated Svalbard population and more contaminated Baltic Sea population. Among OCPs, p,p'-DDE and sum-chlordanes were the highest in concentration. With increasing hepatic contaminant concentrations and activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, the concentrations of 3-methylsulfonyl-p,p'-DDE and the concentration ratios of pentachlorophenol/hexachlorobenzene increased, and the toxaphene pattern shifted more towards persistent Parlar-26 and -50 and less towards more biodegradable Parlar-44. Relative concentrations of the chlordane metabolites, oxychlordane and -heptachlorepoxide, to sum-chlordanes were higher in the seals from Svalbard compared to the seals from the Baltic, while the trend was opposite for cis- and trans-nonachlor. The observed differences in the OCP patterns in the seals from the two populations are probably related to the catalytic activity of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, and also to differences in dietary exposure. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Song, Shanjun
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Song, Maoyong
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zeng, Luzhe
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Runzeng
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Ruan, Ting
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Occurrence and profiles of bisphenol analogues in municipal sewage sludge in China2014In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 186, p. 14-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive use of bisphenol A and its analogues has caused increasing concern over the potential adverse health impacts of these chemicals. In this study, the presence and profiles of 13 bisphenols (BPs) were investigated in 52 municipal sewage sludge samples collected from 30 cities in China. Tetrabromobisphenol A was the most frequently observed analogue (geometric mean: 20.5 ng/g dw). Bisphenol A (4.69 ng/g dw), bisphenol S (3.02 ng/g dw), and bisphenol F (3.84 ng/g dw) were found with similar frequency. Other BP analogues such as tetrachlorobisphenol A, bisphenol AF, bisphenol E, and dihydroxybiphenyl were identified for the first time in sewage sludge in China. Significant correlations were found among BP concentrations, but no relationships were found with wastewater treatment plant characteristics. Profiles of the relative estradiol equivalents suggested that the estrogenic potential of BP mixtures may be associated with the occurrence and contributions of specific analogues.

  • 17.
    Vestergren, Robin
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Tromsø, Norway.
    Herzke, Dorte
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Tromsø, Norway.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Cousins, Ian T.
    Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Are imported consumer products an important diffuse source of PFASs to the Norwegian environment?2015In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 198, p. 223-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to measure perfluoroalkyl substances in a selection of imported consumer products (n = 45) and estimate population normalized emission rates during the use phase. 6:2 and 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) were found in the highest concentrations ranging from <MDL to 374 and 163 mu g m(-2) respectively. Concentrations of FTOHs were approximately 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those of perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs). Although perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was detected in one carpet sample at 1.7 mu g m(-2), the majority of samples complied with regulatory limits for PFOS in the EU. Population normalized emission rates of perfluorooctanoic acid, 6:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOH from imported consumer products were estimated to be 6.6, 2130 and 197 mu g year(-1) capita(-1) respectively for the "intermediate" emistion scenario. The results from this study suggest that emissions from imported products would have a small impact on the environmental concentrations of perfluoroalkyl acids on a regional scale.

  • 18.
    Wang, Jianshe
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Yating
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Fang
    College of Life Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu, China.
    Yeung, Leo W. Y.
    State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Taniyasu, Sachi
    Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Yamazaki, Eriko
    Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Wang, Renping
    Administration Bureau of Anhui Chinese Alligator National Nature Reserve, Xuancheng Anhui, China.
    Lam, Paul K. S.
    State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi
    Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Dai, Jiayin
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Age- and gender-related accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in captive Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis)2013In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 179, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fourteen perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were measured in serum of the highly endangered captive Chinese alligators, whole body homogenates of six kinds of fish (alligator prey species), and pond water (alligator habitat) in the Anhui Research Center for Chinese Alligator Reproduction. Six PFASs, including PFOS and five perfluorinated carboxylates, were detected in all alligator samples. The most dominant PFAS was PFUnDA, with a mean value of 31.4 ng/mL. Significant positive correlations were observed among the six PFASs, suggesting that they shared similar sources of contamination. Significantly higher PFOS and PFUnDA levels were observed in males, but the other four PFCAs did not differ between genders. An age related PFAS bioaccumulation analysis showed a significant negative correlation of the concentrations for five PFCAs to age, which means that higher concentrations were found in younger animals. Bioaccumulation factors (BAF) in fish for PFASs ranged from 21 to 28,000, with lower BAF for PFOA than that for longer carbon chain PFCAs, including PFUnDA, PFDA, and PFNA.

  • 19.
    Wang, Thanh
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085, China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085, China.
    Liao, Chunyang
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085, China.
    Tao, Yongqing
    Shangyu Environmental Protection Bureau, 312300 Shaoxing, Zhejiang, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085, China.
    Use of scalp hair as indicator of human exposure to heavy metals in an electronic waste recycling area2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 8-9, p. 2445-2451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scalp hair samples were collected at an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area and analyzed for trace elements and heavy metals. Elevated levels were found for Cu and Pb with geometric means (GMs) at 39.8 and 49.5 microg/g, and the levels of all elements were found in the rank order Pb > Cu > Mn > Ba > Cr > Ni > Cd > As > V. Besides Cu and Pb, Cd (GM: 0.518 microg/g) was also found to be significantly higher compared to that in hair samples from control areas. Differences with age, gender, residence status and villages could be distinguished for most of the elements. The high levels of Cd, Cu and Pb were likely found to be originated from e-waste related activities, and specific sources were discussed. This study shows that human scalp hair could be a useful biomarker to assess the extent of heavy metal exposure to workers and residents in areas with intensive e-waste recycling activities.

  • 20.
    Wang, Thanh
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Han, Shanlong
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yuan, Bo
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zeng, Lixi
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Yingming
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Summer-winter concentrations and gas-particle partitioning of short chain chlorinated paraffins in the atmosphere of an urban setting2012In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 171, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are semi-volatile chemicals that are considered persistent in the environment, potential toxic and subject to long-range transport. This study investigates the concentrations and gas-particle partitioning of SCCPs at an urban site in Beijing during summer and wintertime. The total atmospheric SCCP levels ranged 1.9-33.0 ng/m(3) during wintertime. Significantly higher levels were found during the summer (range 112-332 ng/m(3)). The average fraction of total SCCPs in the particle phase (ϕ) was 0.67 during wintertime but decreased significantly during the summer (ϕ = 0.06). The ten and eleven carbon chain homologues with five to eight chlorine atoms were the predominant SCCP formula groups in air. Significant linear correlations were found between the gas-particle partition coefficients and the predicted subcooled vapor pressures and octanol-air partition coefficients. The gas-particle partitioning of SCCPs was further investigated and compared with both the Junge-Pankow adsorption and K(oa)-based absorption models.

  • 21.
    Wang, Thanh
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Junchao
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
    Han, Shanlong
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Levels of short chain chlorinated paraffins in pine needles and bark and their vegetation-air partitioning in urban areas2015In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 196, p. 309-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) have been of considerable concern in recent years due to their high production volumes, environmental persistency and potential for long range atmospheric transport. Vegetation can take up considerable amounts of semivolatile organic compounds from the atmosphere and can act as indicators of local contamination. Paired pine needles and bark were sampled around Beijing during winter and summertime to investigate the distribution of SCCPs in urban areas. Levels in bark samples ranged 5.79-37.5 mu g/g on a lipid normalized basis (lw) with a geometric mean (GM) of 16.9 mu g/g lw whereas levels were 3.03-40.8 (GM 11.8) mu g/g lw for needles. Average congener group abundance profiles showed equal contribution of all four carbon groups (C10-13) in wintertime whereas higher abundances of C-10 and C-11 groups were found during summer. Uptake of SCCPs occurred mainly via kinetically limited gaseous deposition and particle bound deposition in the investigated area.

  • 22. Wolkers, Hans
    et al.
    Hammill, Mike O.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Tissue-specific accumulation and lactational transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, and brominated flame retardants in hooded seals (Cistophora cristata) from the Gulf of St. Lawrence: applications for monitoring.2006In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 142, no 3, p. 476-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulation and mother-pup transfer of halogenated organic contaminants was studied in hooded seal tissues from eastern Canada. Blubber polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and total pesticide concentrations were relatively high, possibly due to their high trophic level and demersal feeding habits. Blood plasma showed the lowest contaminant concentrations compared to blubber and liver, possibly due to a lower affinity of these compounds to lipoproteins in blood plasma. Total contaminant body burden correlated well with blubber, liver, and milk contaminants, but not with blood plasma contaminants, indicating that blood plasma might be less suitable to monitor contaminants in hooded seals. Lactational transfer favored less lipophilic contaminants and was associated with relatively high blood plasma PCB and polybrominated diphenyl ether concentrations in females. Despite lactational transfer, females did not show significantly lower blubber contaminant concentrations or burdens than males. This might be caused by their low blubber, and thus contaminant, loss during lactation compared to other species.

  • 23.
    Wöhrnschimmel, Henry
    et al.
    Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Scheringer, Martin
    Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland; Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Bogdal, Christian
    Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland; Institute for Sustainability Sciences ISS, Agroscope, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Hung, Hayley
    Air Quality Processes Research Section, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Salamova, Amina
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Venier, Marta
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Katsoyiannis, Athanasios
    Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) at FRAM e High North Research Centre on Climate and the Environment, Tromsø, Norway.
    Hites, Ronald A.
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Hungerbuhler, Konrad
    Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. DTIE/Chemicals Branch, United Nations Environment Programme, Chatelaine, Switzerland.
    Ten years after entry into force of the Stockholm Convention: What do air monitoring data tell about its effectiveness?2016In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 217, p. 149-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than a decade ago, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), one of the multilateral environmental agreements administered by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), entered into force. The objective of this Convention is to protect human health and the environment by controlling the releases of POPs. According to its Article 16, the effectiveness of the Stockholm Convention shall be evaluated using comparable monitoring data on the presence of POPs as well as their regional and global environmental transport. Here, we present a time series analysis on atmospheric POP concentrations from 15 monitoring stations in North America and Europe that provide long-term data and have started operations between 1990 and 2003. We systematically searched for temporal trends and significant structural changes in temporal trends that might result from the provisions of the Stockholm Convention. We find that such structural changes do occur, but they are related mostly to effects of national regulations enforced prior to the implementation of the Stockholm Convention, rather than to the enforcement of the provisions laid out in the Convention. One example is that concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, many of which started to decrease rapidly during the 1990s. Also effects of chemical transport and fate, for instance the re-volatilization of POPs from secondary sources, are thought to be a cause of some of the observed structural changes. We conclude that a decade of air monitoring data has not been sufficient for detecting general and statistically significant effects of the Stockholm Convention. Based on these lessons, we present recommendations for the future operation of existing monitoring programs and advocate for a stricter enforcement of the provisions of the Stockholm Convention, in the current absence of proof for its effectiveness.

  • 24.
    Yang, Ruiqiang
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental ChemState Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, Chinaistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing, 100085, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Li, An
    School of Public Health, University of Illinois, Chicago IL, USA.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Jing, Chuanyong
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Li, Yingming
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Bejing, China; Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Bejing, China.
    Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in fish from lakes of the Tibetan Plateau and the implications2010In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 158, no 6, p. 2310-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High mountains may play significant roles in the global transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). This work aims to investigate the levels, patterns and distribution of semi-volatile organochlorine pollutants and to improve the understanding of the long-range atmospheric transport and fate of contaminants on the Tibetan Plateau. A total of 60 fish samples were collected from eight lakes located between 2813 and 4718 m above sea level across the Plateau. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were measured in fish muscle. The results showed that concentrations of DDT, HCH and HCB were comparable to or lower than those found in remote mountains of Europe, Canada and US, while PCB concentrations in fish were, on average, about 4-150 times lower on Tibet than at other mountain areas. The transport and fate of contaminants in the Plateau are significantly influenced by the unique climatological and meteorological conditions, particularly by the summer Indian monsoon and winter westerly jet stream.

  • 25.
    Yeung, L. W. Y.
    et al.
    Centre for Coastal Pollution and Conservation, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong; National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Miyake, Y.
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Wang, Y.
    Centre for Coastal Pollution and Conservation, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong: National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Taniyasu, S.
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Yamashita, N.
    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Onogawa 16-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Lam, P. K. S.
    Centre for Coastal Pollution and Conservation, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong.
    Total fluorine, extractable organic fluorine, perfluorooctane sulfonate and other related fluorochemicals in liver of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis) and finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides) from South China2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concentrations of 10 PFCs (perfluorinated compounds: PFOS, PFHxS, PFOSA, N-EtFOSA, PFDoDA, PFUnDA, PFDA, PFNA, PFOA, and PFHpA) were measured in liver samples of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis) (n = 10) and finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides) (n = 10) stranded in Hong Kong between 2003 and 2007. PFOS was the dominant PFC in the tissues at concentrations ranging at 26-693 ng/g ww in dolphins and 51.3-262 ng/g ww in porpoises. A newly developed combustion ion chromatography for fluorine was applied to measure total fluorine (TF) and extractable organic fluorine (EOF) in these liver samples to understand PFC contamination using the concept of mass balance analysis. Comparisons between the amounts of known PFCs and EOF in the livers showed that a large proportion (∼70%) of the organic fluorine in both species is of unknown origin. These investigations are critical for a comprehensive assessment of the risks of these compounds to humans and other receptors.

  • 26.
    Zeng, Lixi
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
    Wang, Thanh
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Ruan, Ting
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Liu, Qian
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Yawei
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jiang, Guibin
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Levels and distribution patterns of short chain chlorinated paraffins in sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plants in China2012In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 160, no 1, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are listed as persistent organic pollutant candidates in the Stockholm Convention and are receiving more and more attentions worldwide. In general, concentrations of contaminants in sewage sludge can give an important indication on their pollution levels at a local/regional basis. In this study, SCCPs were investigated in sewage sludge samples collected from 52 wastewater treatment plants in China. Concentrations of total SCCPs (ΣSCCPs) in sludge were in the range of 0.80-52.7 μg/g dry weight (dw), with a mean value of 10.7 μg/g dw. Most of SCCPs in the sludge samples showed a similar congener distribution patterns, and C(11) and Cl(7,8) were identified as the dominant carbon and chlorine congener groups. Significant linear relationships were found among different SCCP congener groups (r(2) ≥ 0.9). High concentrations of SCCPs in sewage sludge imply that SCCPs are widely present in China.

  • 27.
    Zhang, Tingting
    et al.
    College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Hu, Liyang
    College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Zhang, Minglu
    Key Laboratory of Cleaner Production and Integrated Resource Utilization of China National Light Industry, Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Jiang, Mengyun
    College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bai, Wenrong
    Beijing North Canal Management Division, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Wang, Xiaohui
    College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Zhang, Dayi
    School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Li, Zetang
    College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
    Cr(VI) removal from soils and groundwater using an integrated adsorption and microbial fuel cell (A-MFC) technology2019In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 252, no Pt B, p. 1399-1405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remediation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has been widely studied for its high mobility and toxicity. As Cr(VI) migrates in natural environment, both soils and groundwater are contaminated simultaneously. In the present study, a novel reactor combining adsorption and microbial fuel cell (A-MFC) using Platanus acerifolia leaves was developed for removing Cr(VI) from groundwater and soils. When initial Cr(VI) concentration was 50 mg/L, the adsorption efficiency of A-MFC achieved 98% after 16 h. Afterwards, the leaves were used for fabricating an MFC-integrated leaching reactor. The A-MFC significantly improved the overall Cr(VI) removal efficiency through leaching and 40% of Cr(VI) in the soil column was removed. The electrical voltage and current of A-MFC reactor achieved averagely 343 mV and 141 μA to maintain the system operation without extra energy supply. This novel A-MFC reactor is an environmentally friendly technology which achieved efficient Cr(VI) removal from groundwater and soils using natural materials, proving the concept that integrated self-remediation of Cr(VI) in contaminated soil and groundwater with natural material and energy.

  • 28.
    Zhang, Wei
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Yating
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Taniyasu, Sachi
    Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Yeung, Leo W. Y.
    Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan; State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Lam, Paul K. S.
    State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Wang, Jianshe
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Li, Xinhai
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi
    Environmental Measurement Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Dai, Jiayin
    Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Distribution and fate of perfluoroalkyl substances in municipal wastewater treatment plants in economically developed areas of China2013In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 176, p. 10-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a significant source for poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) entering the environment. The presence of PFASs in twenty-eight municipal WWTPs from eleven cites in economically developed areas of China were screened. Overall, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) were dominant in wastewater and sludge, and were not effectively removed during wastewater treatment. Elevated influent concentration ratios of perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) to PFOA and perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) to PFOS in some WWTPs suggested that short chains substitution were adopted in these cities. Cluster analysis showed treatment processes had important impacts on PFASs profiles in effluent and sludge. Average concentration of total PFCAs in influent from each city and its gross domestic product (GDP) had significant positive correlation. This study provides a snapshot of both domestic and industrial discharges of PFAS to WWTPs as well as PFAS discharge from WWTPs to the aquatic environment in China.

  • 29.
    Zhu, Nali
    et al.
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Peoples R. China.
    Schramm, Karl-Werner
    Mol EXpos MEX, Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und UmweltMol EXpos MEX, Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt (GmbH), Neuherberg, Germany; Weihenstephan für Ernährung und Landnutzung, Department für Biowissenschaften, Wissenschaftszentrum, Technische Universität München, Freising, Germany.
    Wang, Thanh
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Peoples R. China.
    Henkelmann, Bernhard
    Mol EXpos MEX, Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt (GmbH), Neuherberg, Germany.
    Zheng, Xiaoyan
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Peoples R. China; China National Environmental Monitoring Center, Beijing, Peoples R. China.
    Fu, Jianjie
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Peoples R. China.
    Gao, Yan
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Peoples R. China.
    Wang, Yawei
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Peoples R. China; Mol EXpos MEX, Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt (GmbH), Neuherberg, Germany.
    Jiang, Guibin
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, Peoples R. China.
    Environmental fate and behavior of persistent organic pollutants in Shergyla Mountain, southeast of the Tibetan Plateau of China2014In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 191, p. 166-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pristine mountains are ideal settings to study transport and behavior of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) along gradients of climate and land cover. The present work investigated the concentrations and patterns of 28 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), 25 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs), 13 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and 3 hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDs) isomers in the air of the Shergyla Mountain, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Endosulfan І, hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexanes and dichlorodibenzotrichloroethane and its degradation products (DDTs) were the predominant compounds while PBDEs and HBCDs showed the lowest background concentrations. Most of the target POPs had significantly higher concentrations in summer than those in winter. Increasing trends of the concentrations of DDTs and endosulfan were found with increasing altitude on the western slope in the Shergyla Mountain. Potential forest filter effect was observed based on the lower air concentrations of the target POPs in the forest than the ones out of the forest.

1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf