oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Toulouse School of Economics, Toulouse, France.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Scale sensitivity and question order in the contingent valuation method2014In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 1746-1761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the effect on respondents’ willingness to pay to reduce mortality risk by the order of the questions in a stated preference study. Using answers from an experiment conducted on a Swedish sample where respondents’ cognitive ability was measured and where they participated in a contingent valuation survey, it was found that scale sensitivity is strongest when respondents are asked about a smaller risk reduction first (‘bottom-up’ approach). This contradicts some previous evidence in the literature. It was also found that the respondents’ cognitive ability is more important for showing scale sensitivity when respondents are asked about a larger risk reduction first (‘top-down’ approach), also reinforcing the result that a ‘bottom-up’ approach is more consistent with answers in line with theoretical predictions for a larger proportion of respondents.

  • 2.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Börjeson, Natasja
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Gilek, Michael
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Media and Communication Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Responsible procurement and complex product chains: the case of chemical risks in textiles2012In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to gain insights about the opportunities andchallenges that private and public organisations face regarding the developmentof responsible procurement in a complex and uncertain issue. The paper focuseson chemicals in textiles, and uses a qualitative methodology with semi-structuredinterviews. Key elements of a pro-active, responsible procurement strategy aredefined, including criteria such as using a preventive, systematic, responsive,integrative and reflective approach. The analysis includes the following topics: (1)priorities and knowledge; (2) communicative strategies; (3) policy instruments; (4)monitoring and trust in relation to suppliers. The results show a fairly modestlevel of organisational responsibility, although it is possible to observe an initialpositive development.

  • 3.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Households as role models for sustainable consumption: the case of local climate dialogues in two Swedish towns2013In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 194-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research problem addressed concerns the interplay between households as consumers, and local governments as policy makers and service providers. Mainly based on interviews with selected households, the paper explores the activities, results and potential long-term gains of a climate dialogue project undertaken in two Swedish towns. The findings are interpreted in terms of Spaargaren and Oosterveer's ideal types of the consumer as ecological citizen, political consumer and moral agent. The main finding is that although the immediate gains in terms of GHG reduction are small, such projects may function as triggers of future change towards more sustainable policies and everyday practices.

  • 4.
    Hall, Patrik
    et al.
    Department of Global Political Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Advancing voluntary chemical governance?: The case of the Swedish textile industry dialogue2019In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 1001-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Voluntary environmental governance is a widely used policy approach that has been criticized for its lack of effectiveness. This raises fundamental questions about how to design processes that can advance voluntary programmes in a way that makes them more successful. In this paper, we analyse a government-initiated dialogue process to phase out hazardous chemicals through voluntary action by the Swedish textile industry. The analysis shows that information transfer primarily motivated business participation, while consumer pressure, regulatory threats and traditions of government–business cooperation played minor roles. The institutional design of the dialogue ensured close interaction within a homogeneous group, but collective actions were limited by disagreement about the problems to be addressed, prior unilateral environmental commitments by leading companies, and ambivalent engagement. This case provides valuable insights into the effect of institutional design on the actual interplay between business and government and its effects on voluntary governance.

  • 5.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frändberg, Lotta
    Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vilhelmson, Bertil
    Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Compromising sustainable mobility?: the case of the Gothenburg congestion tax2015In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 1058-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Congestion charging is widely considered an effective policy measure to regulate and reduce car traffic demand and associated environmental and health problems in cities. However, introducing restrictive measures to constrain individual choice and behaviour for the common good has often proven difficult. Using a specific case, the Gothenburg congestion tax introduced in 2013, we study the policy process behind the introduction of the tax and assess to what extent green values were compromised along the way. The tax was made possible by co-financing infrastructure investments, including roads, which seemingly contradicts stated goals of reducing car traffic and emissions. We show how the tax was ‘muddled through’ in a top-down political compromise by a grand coalition where different interests could legitimate their support in relation to the achievement of partially conflicting objectives and projects. However, to declare the regulatory goals fully neutralised would be to underestimate the scheme’s direct environmental effects and restrictive potential. Finding a compromise with powerful political and economic interests was necessary to get it off the ground. Once launched, however, it can over time regain its restrictive properties and lead to more profound long-term effects.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, The Tema Institute, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lotta
    Swedish Meteorological Hydrological Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Alkan Olsson, Johanna
    Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Madelaine
    Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, The Tema Institute, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Defining goals in participatory water management: merging local visions and expert judgements2011In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 909-935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management by objectives is intrinsic to the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) and Swedish environmental policy. We describe three approaches to formulating objectives via model-assisted dialogue with local stakeholders, concerning eutrophication in a coastal drainage area in south-eastern Sweden: a WFD eco-centred approach based on “natural state”, Swedish environmental policy reformulated into quantified reduction goals, and a participatory approach based on local stakeholder definitions of desirable environmental status. Despite representativity problems, we conclude that local stake­holder participation in formulating local goals could increase goal function­ality and robustness when adapting and implementing national and EU WFD goals at the local level.

  • 7.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Mercury waste management in Sweden: historical perspectives and recent trends2000In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 561-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the development of Swedish policy for mercury waste management. Starting with a description of the development of the policy for hazardous waste management in Sweden, the paper examines the process which led to the parliamentary decision that mercury waste should be gathered and safely disposed of. Special emphasis is placed on how the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency deals with questions of uncertainties and risks connected to deep disposal, and to what extent the government considers that people living close to the disposal should have the opportunity to influence the decision process. The paper concludes that this policy may be hard to implement. The proposed solution may create new problems which concern to what extent and in what way the local population will trust authorities when it comes to the assertion that deep disposal will not constitute any risk for themselves or their local environment.

  • 8.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The values of biological diversity: a travelogue2010In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 91-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological diversity is an abstract, scientific concept and both evaluating its condition and, to great extent, justifying its conservation require expert knowledge. Accordingly, regulating and managing biological diversity presupposes standardization and methods for managing uncertainty. To be acted on, the concept must be promoted, passing, in this process, through various institutions, such as intergovernmental organizations and national administrations. This paper examines how the principle of biological diversity conservation is defined, focusing on the values of biological diversity and how this notion has “travelled the world”. The paper includes a study of how the principle of biological diversity was applied in a specific case of insect control in Sweden.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf