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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    “You can't make this a science!”: Analyzing decision support systems in political contexts2012In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 543-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on problems and conflicts encountered when using decision support systems (DSS) in political contexts. Based on a literature study and two case studies we describe problems encountered in relation not only to the DSS itself, but also to the political decision process. The case studies have been carried out in two cities in Sweden that at different times but in similar situations have used DSS in order to reach a decision in complicated and contested matters. In both cases we have previously found that the method and IT tool used for decision analysis were appreciated by most participants, but the inherent rationality of the DSS was in conflict with how participants usually make decisions as well as with the political process. The assumption was that a strict and open method would make grounds for clear decisions, but the results of the decision process were none of the cases implemented. In one case the result of the decision analysis was that no clear decision was made. In the other case the lowest ranked alternative was implemented. Furthermore, in neither city the method was ever used again. We therefore ask: What are the challenges and limitations to using DSS in political contexts? Our study shows that challenges relate to selecting and using criteria; eliciting weights for criteria (high level of subjectivity); understanding all the amount of facts available in the system; time constraints; and lack of impact on the final decision. This study contributes to both research and practice by increasing the understanding of what challenges are experienced in DSS use, since the findings can be used as a framework of challenges that should be addressed, in design of systems as well as method for use. The study also contributes to understanding the role of politicians in decision-making and the consequences for the use of DSS. Further, the literature study showed that there are overall very few studies on the actual use of DSS in a political context, and we therefore conclude by encouraging more studies reporting actual use.

  • 2.
    Hellberg, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Conflicts in implementing interoperability: re-operationalizing basic values2013In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 154-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interoperability is a top priority today as governments try to integrate services across departments so as to improve effectiveness as well as efficiency. Integration in government is complicated, as evidenced by a discouraging project failure rate. An often quoted reason is that the complex relationships among government, society, and technology which come into play when integrating multiple organizations are not fully understood. This paper addresses this gap by scrutinizing a large national integration project asking, what is the nature and causes of the conflicts that surface during implementation? Data was collected by means of participant observations and narrative interviews. Seven major conflicts were found, all general because they involve basic values which were in conflict with each other. The values were specified by legislation and strictly operationalized in various government institutions which, consequently, were in disagreement about what was legal and desirable. The findings show that in order to achieve interoperability a "re-operationalization" of these values is necessary. These changes cannot be clearly defined upfront but must be "negotiated" by means of practical achievements that are considered important enough to motivate gradual changes in the way we implement our values in legislation and practices. This means that ambitious integration projects must serve as spearheads in such value change, which is a root cause for delays and even failure.

  • 3.
    Holgersson, Jesper
    et al.
    Informatics Research Centre, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Public e-service development: understanding citizens' conditions for participation2014In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 396-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For decades, user participation has brought value to various systems development projects. Today, there are expectations that public e-service development will experience the same benefits. However, existing research has shown that introducing user participation into public e-service development can be challenging. In this study, we interviewed citizens in order to explore their willingness and ability to participate in public e-service development according to three user participation schools: User-Centred Design, Participatory Design and User Innovation. Our findings show that citizens in general are willing to participate, but their ability to do so is limited. Based on our findings, we developed nine propositions to explain citizens' willingness and ability to participate in public e-service development. The propositions contribute to practice by acting as a tentative guide for systems developers when they use user participation schools as inspiration in public e-service projects. They also act as a starting point for future research into conditions for user participation in public e-service development. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Informatics, CERIS.
    Frostenson, Magnus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Prenkert, Frans
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Business Administration, INTERORG.
    Kolkowska, Ella
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Informatics, CERIS.
    Helin, Sven
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Inter-organisational information sharing in the public sector: A longitudinal case study on the reshaping of success factors2017In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 567-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, public organisations need to share information in order to complete their tasks. Over the years, scholars have mapped out the social and organisational factors that affect the success or failure of these kinds of endeavours. However, few of the suggested models have sought to address the temporal aspect of inter-organisational information sharing. The aim of this paper is to investigate the reshaping of social and organisational factors of inter-organisational information sharing in the public sector over time. We analysed four years' worth of information sharing in an inter-organisational reference group on copper corrosion in the context of nuclear waste management. We could trace how factors in the model proposed by Yang and Maxwell (2011) were reshaped over time. Two factors in the model – concerns of information misuse and trust – are frequently assessed by organisations and are the most likely to change. In the long run we also found that legislation and policies can change.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University. Informatics Research Centre, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Holgersson, Jesper
    Informatics Research Centre, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Söderström, Eva
    Informatics Research Centre, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Informatics Research Centre, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Exploring user participation approaches in public e-service development2012In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 158-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been argued that user participation is important when public authorities develop e-services. At the same time there is limited research on the usefulness of existing user participation approaches in public e-service development. In this paper we, therefore, analyze how the three user participation approaches – participatory design, user-centered design, and user innovation – meet the strategic e-service goals of the EU and the US. In doing so, we identify three challenges that need to be considered when choosing among these approaches: 1) unclear user target segments can impede the fulfillment of usability and relevance goals, 2) the nature of participation can impede the fulfillment of democracy goals, and 3) lack of adequate skills can impede the fulfillment of efficiency goals.

  • 6.
    Larsson, Hannu
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Future-oriented eGovernance: The sustainability concept in eGov research, and ways forward2014In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 137-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eGov (eGovernment/eGovernance) is a complex endeavor involving many actors, ambitions, and perspectives. The field has, in research and in practice, over the years expanded its focus from service orientation to a comprehensive perspective with the ambition to integrate all of government in coherent action. Comprehensive integration requires a future-oriented perspective so investment is made in robust and flexible solutions meeting not only today's demands but also sustainable to meet those of the future. This paper addresses the use of the sustainability concept in eGov research. We discuss definitions and elements of sustainability and conduct a structured review of eGov literature investigating how various sustainability areas (social, economic, environmental and technical) are addressed. We find 21 overall themes in 94 papers, with the highest number in the “social” category. Two cross-cutting themes to which 21 overall themes relate are also identified; Decision-making and Infrastructure. Findings show that sustainability is mainly addressed narrowly, focusing on projects rather than general issues, and shallowly with a focus on single factors rather than the complex interaction among them, and with little foundation in sustainability theory. The paper contributes with an overview of themes in previous research as well as theory-based input for future research efforts on eGov sustainability, from a dynamic and sociotechnical sustainability perspective.

  • 7.
    Larsson, Hannu
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sustainable eGovernance?: Practices, problems and beliefs about the future in Swedish eGov practice2016In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 105-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of ICTs in the public sector, eGovernance, is understood as a complex phenomenon intricately embedded in a continuously changing environment, including multiple actors with disparate interests.  A need for research that takes this complexity into account has been identified, and previous research has suggested employing a sustainability perspective.  The use of the sustainability concept in the eGovernance context is an emerging area without a common focus or use of the concept. There is a lack of research with a thorough basis in sustainability theory, and a need for empirical research focusing on sustainable eGovernance. In order to respond to this need the research question of this paper is, How can current eGovernance practice be interpreted from a sustainability perspective? A case study is performed in the context of Swedish eGovernance practice, at national and municipal level. Interviews are used to investigate practitioners’ views, which are analyzed by using a framework, developed based on eGovernance literature that highlights sustainability. We find that sustainability in eGovernance practice in this case revolve to a large extent around how actors struggle with achieving continuity and implementing a holistic view of the use of ICT in the public sector. We also highlight the issue of trade-offs between different sustainability dimensions.  

  • 8.
    Mutimukwe, Chantal
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. School of ICT, University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Kolkowska, Ella
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Information privacy in e-service: Effect of organizational privacy assurances on individual privacy concerns, perceptions, trust and self-disclosure behavior2020In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 37, no 1, article id 101413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing use of the Internet for service delivery has paralleled an increase of e-service users' privacy concerns as technology offers ample opportunities for organizations to store, process, and exploit personal data. This may reduce individuals' perceived ability to control their personal information and increase their perceived privacy risk. A systematic understanding of individuals' privacy concerns is important as negative user perceptions are a challenge to service providers' reputation and may hamper service delivery processes as they influence users' trust and willingness to disclose personal information. This study develops and validates a model that examines the effect of organizational privacy assurances on individual privacy concerns, privacy control and risk perceptions, trust beliefs and non-self-disclosure behavior. Drawing on a survey to 547 users of different types of e-services – e-government, e-commerce and social networking – in Rwanda, and working within the framework of exploratory analysis, this study uses partial least square-structural equation modeling to validate the overall model and the proposed hypotheses. The findings show that perceptions of privacy risks and privacy control are antecedents of e-service users' privacy concerns, trust and non-self-disclosure behavior. They further show that the perceived effectiveness of privacy policy and perceived effectiveness of self-regulations influence both perceptions of privacy risks and control and their consequences; users' privacy concerns, trust and non-self-disclosure behavior. The hypotheses are supported differently across the three types of e-services, which means that privacy is specific to context and situation. The study shows that the effect of privacy assurances on trust is different in e-government services than in other services which suggest that trust in e-government may be more complex and different in nature than in other contexts. The findings serve to enhance a theoretical understanding of organizational privacy assurances and individual privacy concerns, trust and self-disclosure behavior. They also have implications for e-service providers and users as well as for regulatory bodies and e-services designers.

  • 9.
    Susha, Iryna
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Context clues for the stall of the Citizens' Initiative: lessons for opening up e-participation development practice2014In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 454-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union recently launched an innovative participatory mechanism allowing its citizens across Europe get together and set the agenda for policy-making in Brussels. The tool - the European Citizens' Initiative - was labelled as "most direct and digital" ever in the history of European democratic experimentation as it made it possible to collect signatures (of which it is required not less than 1 million) in favour of an initiative via the internet (e-collection). Launched on I April 2012 the ECI was met with major enthusiasm in Brussels, but soon stumbled over serious difficulties as the organisers on the ground were unable to set up their online collection systems. The present paper looks into this ICT-related crisis from the point of reference of e-democracy theory based on the findings of a qualitative case-study. As a deliverable, it offers an understanding of factors and stakeholder rationales which shaped the design and implementation of the digital dimension of the ECI (iECI). (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Susha, Iryna
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    eParticipation research: systematizing the field2012In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been widely acknowledged recently that the research field of eParticipation suffers from lack of comprehensive theoretical contributions, insufficient depth, and inconsistency in definitions of central concepts. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the field researchers find it difficult to consolidate their theoretical groundwork and further theory building in the eParticipation domain. This paper reports a literature study of conceptual publications on the subject of eParticipation/eDemocracy in the time frame of 2007–2009. Its objectives are to track recent theoretical development in the field, to reveal constraints and limitations to researching the area, and to offer some suggestions for further inquiry. The results show that most theories currently used in conceptual eParticipation research originate from the fields of Political Science and Media and Communication Studies. But together with this, contemporary eParticipation authors contribute to strengthening the field with some “in-house” models and frameworks as well. Central problems with eParticipation research concern immaturity of the field, topical gaps, and biased assumptions. The review shows that the themes of recent publications can be grouped into three major categories: stakeholders, environment, and applications and tools. It also finds some interconnections between these categories; however, in general the coupling technology–stakeholders–(participatory) environments is weak.

  • 11.
    Susha, Iryna
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Section Information and Communication Technology, Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Van Tulder, Rob
    RSM Erasmus University Rotterdam, Department of Business-Society Management, Partnerships Resource Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Data driven social partnerships: Exploring an emergent trend in search of research challenges and questions2019In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 112-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume of data collected by multiple devices, such as mobile phones, sensors, satellites, is growing at an exponential rate. Accessing and aggregating different sources of data, including data outside the public domain, has the potential to provide insights for many societal challenges. This catalyzes new forms of partnerships between public, private, and nongovernmental actors aimed at leveraging different sources of data for positive societal impact and the public good. In practice there are different terms in use to label these partnerships but research has been lagging behind in systematically examining this trend. In this paper, we deconstruct the conceptualization and examine the characteristics of this emerging phenomenon by systematically reviewing academic and practitioner literature. To do so, we use the grounded theory literature review method. We identify several concepts which are used to describe this phenomenon and propose an integrative definition of “data driven social partnerships” based on them. We also identify a list of challenges which data driven social partnerships face and explore the most urgent and most cited ones, thereby proposing a research agenda. Finally, we discuss the main contributions of this emerging research field, in relation to the challenges, and systematize the knowledge base about this phenomenon for the research community.

  • 12.
    Twizeyimana, Jean Damascene
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. College of Science & Technology, University of Rwanda, KN 7 Ave, Kigali, Rwanda.
    Andersson, Annika
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The public value of E-Government: A literature review2019In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 167-178Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study organizes existing research on the public value of e-government in order to investigate the current state and what value e-government is supposed to yield. The two questions that guided the research were: (1) What is the current state of research on the public value of e-government? And (2) What value is e-government supposed to yield? Six, sometimes overlapping, values were found: Improved public services; improved administrative efficiency; Open Government (OG) capabilities; improved ethical behaviour and professionalism; improved trust and confidence in government; and improved social value and well-being. These six public value dimensions were thereafter generalized into three overarching, and also overlapping, public value dimensions of Improved Public Services, Improved Administration, and Improved Social Value. The improved public services dimension influences other dimensions. Hence, this literature study theorizes a descriptive and multidimensional framework that can improve our understanding of the public value of e-government from different viewpoints, and the overlap between them in actual e-government designs and implementations. Regarding the current state of research on the public value this study found a lack of research on the public value of e-government, especially, in the context of developing countries – and more importantly – a total absence of this kind of research in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs). There is also a lack of comparative studies at national, regional, and project level; and a lack of research on the generative perspective.

    Download full text (pdf)
    The public value of E-Government : A literature review
  • 13.
    Åström, Joachim
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Karlsson, Martin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Linde, Jonas
    Center for Comparative Politics, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Pirannejad, Ali
    Department of Public Administration, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Understanding the rise of e-participation in non-democracies: domestic and international factors2012In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 142-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While it has often been suggested that information and communication technologies (ICTs) provide an important means of increasing citizen participation (which is at the core of democratic government), few commentators have expected non-democracies to create online environments in which citizens can take an active part in political processes. In recent years, however, some non-democracies have begun to outperform countries with long-standing democratic traditions in terms of e-participation development. According to the 2010 United Nations (UN) e-government survey, Bahrain outranks France, Kazakhstan beats Sweden and Malaysia ranks higher than Germany. This article sets out to understand the recent rise of e-participation initiatives in non-democracies. Drawing on comparative longitudinal data from the UN e-government surveys, we tested the assertion that international drivers of change are competing with the dominant focus on domestic factors, especially in the non-democratic world, and are influencing the patterns of reform. The empirical analysis demonstrated important differences between the drivers of change in democratic and non-democratic countries and found economic globalization to be the strongest predictor of e-participation initiatives in non-democratic countries. In conclusion, we argue that economic globalization alters the context of e-participation and necessitates a re-examination of many of its premises and tenets.

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