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  • 1.
    Cater, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Children’s descriptions of participation processes in intervention for children exposed to intimate partner violence2014In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 5, no 31, p. 455-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, interventions have been developed to meet the needs of children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). This study explores and analyses processes of participation during counselling as described by 29 children who had received community-based intervention for children exposed to IPV. The results of the analysis show how participation processes in the different phases of the intervention are related to three prerequisites for children actually receiving the intervention offered, namely (1) the child getting in contact with the unit, (2) the child starting the intervention process, and, because the intervention is directed at their experiences of IPV, and (3) the child actually talking about the violence. The implications of these results are used to discuss children’s willingness and reluctance to talk about IPV during interventions in which talking about their experiences is thought to be of therapeutic value.

  • 2.
    Cater, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sjögren, Johanna
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence Describe Their Experiences: A Typology-Based Qualitative Analysis2016In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 473-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although much is known about the impact of intimate partner violence on children, few empirical studies have linked children’s experiences to typologies. This qualitative study, based on interviews with children 8–12 years of age living at women’s shelters in Sweden, explores how children describe the nature of the violence they have been exposed to with the aim of identifying patterns in the children’s experiences. The typologies developed by Johnson and colleagues and by Holtzworth-Munroe and colleagues are used as an analytical framework for analysis. Three main types of children’s experiences of intimate partner violence were identified: “Obedience-Demanding Violence,” “Chronic and Mean Violence,” and “Parenthood-Embedded Violence.” These the types can improve our understanding of the complex variety of children’s experiences of parental IPV by acknowledging how from children’s perspectives, experiences of IPV are closely connected to the perpetrator being their parent. The study provides examples of three different strategies that have implications for the factors that social workers may want to address when making judgments about custody, place of residence, and contact.

  • 3.
    Tinnfält, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Adolescent children of alcoholics on disclosure, support, and assessment of trustworthy adults2011In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 133-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe adolescent children of alcoholics’ (COA) perspectives on disclosure and support. COA reported assessing the trustworthiness of adults before disclosing their home situation. Before disclosure they may have raised their own level of consciousness, told a peer, told an adult stranger, or in-directly communicated with an adult. These findings are the result of interviews with 27 adolescents attending support groups for COA in Sweden. Adults, who ask questions, listen carefully and cooperate with the child/adolescent, and who are knowledgeable about families with alcohol problems, are considered as supportive and trustworthy. The adolescents reported psychological, communicative, environmental, and generational aspects of the disclosure process.

  • 4. Tinnfält, Agneta
    et al.
    Fröding, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Madelene
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    "I Feel It In My Heart When My Parents Fight": Experiences of 7-9-Year-Old Children of Alcoholics2018In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 531-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children are vulnerable when exposed to parental alcohol abuse. Although much is known about children of alcoholics (COA), research examining the experiences of younger COA is scarce. To gain knowledge of the consequences for these children, it is important to ask the children themselves. This study explored the consequences for a child of having an alcoholic parent, from the point of view of 7-9-year-old COA. Eighteen children were interviewed, whose alcoholic parent was undergoing treatment, using a vignette. In the analysis, using qualitative content analysis, the findings show that the children of this young age had much experiences and took a great responsibility for their alcoholic parent, and the family. The most significant feeling of the children was a feeling of sadness. They tried to control the situation in different ways. They wished for a change in the future, but despite problems in the family they described things they did together with a loving parent. Implications include the importance of listening to and supporting all COA, also children as young as 7-9 years old. Further studies should address the support that can and should be offered to COA.

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