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  • 1.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ortega, Enrique
    University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    An attachment family-based intervention to prevent adolescents' problem behaviors: a pilot study in Italy2013In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 71-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In spite of the proven effectiveness of parenting based programs to prevent adolescent risk behaviors, such programs are rarely implemented in Mediterranean countries.

    Objective

    This pilot study was aimed at assessing the feasibility and the effects of a parenting based universal prevention program (Connect) in Italy.

    Methods

    Our sample comprised 147 mothers and 147 youths, aged 11–14 (M = 12.46, SD = .72). We adopted a quasi-experimental design. Forty percent of the parents in the sample were in the intervention condition (receiving 10 one hour lessons a week). ANCOVAs and Cohen’s d coefficients were used to compute intervention effects.

    Results

    The results showed that, despite difficulty in recruiting parents, the program held promising effects regarding the prevention of alcohol use at a universal level (Cohen’s d = .55); the intervention also marginally decreased the level of non-empathic answers from parents, at least in the short term (Cohen’s d = .32).

    Conclusions

    This study highlighted the importance of focusing on families to prevent problem behaviors in adolescence. It also points to the need for new strategies to engage parents in universal prevention.

  • 2.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardarens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The Implementation Integrity of Parenting Programs: Which Aspects Are Most Important?2019In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 917-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of preventive interventions is considered a crucial aspect of their success. However, few studies have investigated which components of implementation are most important.

    Objective: We aimed to understand whether the components of implementation integrity—adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participants’ involvement—influenced the effectiveness of four parenting programs. We also investigated factors associated with these components.

    Method: Data come from a national evaluation of parenting programs in Sweden. The study was a randomised controlled effectiveness trial, with a sample of 535 parents with 3–12-year-old children. Measures included parenting behaviors (angry outbursts, harsh parenting, attempts to understand, rewarding, and praising), child conduct problems (ECBI and SNAP-V), and measures tapping into the four components (adherence, quality of delivery, dose, and participant involvement).

    Results: We ran multilevel models and found that implementation quality (adherence and quality of delivery) did not influence the effects on parents and children. Conversely, participant involvement was associated with improvements in parenting and child conduct. Finally, parents’ perceptions of their leaders as supportive and understanding were associated with parents’ responsiveness and attendance.

    Conclusions: Our study highlights the importance of having actively engaged parents to maximise intervention effects.

  • 3.
    Ortega, Enrique
    et al.
    Laboratory of Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Latina, Delia
    Laboratory of Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Ciairano, Silvia
    Laboratory of Developmental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Cultural adaptation of the strengthening families program 10-14 to Italian families2012In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 197-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family context has proven to be a useful target in which to apply prevention efforts aimed at child and adolescent health risk behaviors. There are currently a variety of cultural adaptation models that serve to guide the international adaptation of intervention programs.

    The cultural adaptation process and program reception of the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 (SFP 10-14) was described in this article. The implementation context is one in which strong family bonds and high family communication are the norm.

    We described our cultural adaptation process comparing our efforts to the recommended stages of the main current cultural adaptation models. We pilot tested and implemented the adapted version of our program with a total of 35 families in the city of Turin Italy.

    This study showed that the SFP 10-14 may indeed be quite suitable for Italian families given the particularities of Italian society regarding strong family bonds and extended social networks. We described the language translation, cultural adaptation process for program materials, staff training, onsite supervision, and the process evaluation feedback that were undertaken as part of the adaptation efforts.

    The field of prevention could greatly benefit from the identification of tools and techniques that are applicable to populations with diverse social and cultural backgrounds. The family is extremely important for Italians and represents a rich context in which prevention efforts could be addressed.

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