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  • 1.
    Hedin, Lena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Höjer, Ingrid
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    Settling into a new home as a teenager: about establishing social bonds in different types of foster families in Sweden2011In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 2282-2289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a glimpse into young people's experiences and understandings of everyday life during their initial stages of placement in various types of foster families. The way family interactions strengthen or weaken the social bond between foster youth and foster family is focused upon. In this study the young people in kinship foster families reported the strongest social bonds to their foster families and the adolescents in traditional foster families the weakest. This is in line with previous research. However, youth in network foster families with whom they were not so close prior to placement also reported rather strong social bonds to the foster family, which is not well known. Including network foster families in the study sheds light on the importance of adolescents' active involvement and agency in choosing their foster family. Examples of family interactions which seem to be crucial in strengthening social bonds, also in traditional foster families, are e.g. fair treatment by other family members, mutual family activities, negotiating to find solutions, and, which is not so well known, humorous joking and laughing together. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Larsson, Madelene
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Pettersson, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Charli
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Initial motives and organizational context enabling female mentors' engagement in formal mentoring: a qualitative study from the mentors' perspective2016In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 71, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mentoring aimed at supporting young people and their development shows promising results, but its delivery is threatened by the difficulty of recruiting sufficient numbers of mentors and keeping them engaged over time. The aim of this study was to help overcome this problem by examining female mentors’ motives for engaging in formal voluntary mentoring of young women, and exploring how organizations can facilitate these mentors’ satisfaction in staying engaged over time. Based on qualitative interviews with 12 mentors in a Swedish non-governmental organization, the Girls Zone, we show six categories of mentor motives related to initial motivation for engagement: self-interested reasons, empowering women, being a responsible citizen, sense of compassion, self-awareness, and longing for meaningfulness. In addition, we show five categories related to the organizational work of satisfying mentors: a win-win relationship, a feeling of ambivalence despite clear responsibilities and contributions, customized support and guidance, a caring organizational identity, and a commitment to pursue with feelings of duty and emotional connection. Using Self-Determination Theory as the framework to guide our understanding of the findings, we conclude that mentors’ motivations for engaging as mentors are linked to the fulfillment of basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Practical recommendations are offered in light of the findings.

  • 3.
    Lindahl, Robert
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Professional dilemmas and occupational constraints in child welfare workers' relationships with children and youth in foster care2018In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 88, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the same time as the number of child and youth placements in foster care is increasing in Sweden, some serious deficiencies have been highlighted, such as instability in placements and shortcomings in the social services' monitoring. Because the child welfare workers are ultimately responsible for these children's situation, understanding how they handle their multi-dimensional occupational role is crucial. The aim of this article is to study child welfare workers' individual and collective experiences of and expectations about their occupational role and responsibilities in their administrative and relational work with children and youth in foster care. Individual interviews with child welfare workers from a previous evaluation of a national pilot project, and two focus groups with child welfare workers, constitute the empirical basis. Theoretically the article explores central concepts such as sub-roles, dilemmas, professionalism, and functional specificity. The results show that the child welfare workers are burdened by a heavy workload, but that the prerequisites and the obstacles they face also must be understood in relation to prevailing contradictions and dilemmas in their occupational role. Even though the child welfare workers stress that professionalism is about putting relational work first, their activity is dominated by administrative tasks and functional specificity.

  • 4.
    Olofsson, Viveca
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Implementing group based parenting programs: A narrative review2016In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 69, p. 67-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group based preventive parenting programs are efficacious, but seem hard to implement sustainably within regular service. This review aimed to investigate specific challenges related to their implementation. Through a systematic search in several databases, we retrieved 1356 articles for title, abstract, and full-text screening. After screening, we selected 35 articles for quality rating. An established narrative approach allowed us to include 24 studies. We used an ecological approach and a recently suggested implementation construct terminology to report our findings. To date, there are no evaluations of the implementation of group based programs where implementation aspects and effectiveness are compared with other kinds of programs or formats. Hence, important research knowledge is lacking concerning implementation of group based parenting programs. Our finding indicate that certain format specific implementation aspects of group based parenting programs are perceived by practitioners as particularly challenging. For instance, scheduling of group leader workload, provision of additional services (e.g., meals and childcare), and recruitment of participants. Further, practitioners and group leaders influence implementation success and program sustainability as well as parental attitudes and reasons for participation. To highlight the importance of practitioners and parents we suggest adaptations to the ecological model approach. Overall, the theoretical foundation of current implementation research is weak and future implementation research need to be theoretically driven. It is important to fill the existing lack of implementation knowledge because it might be one of the reasons why group based parenting programs have limited impact as preventive interventions on children's mental well-being.

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