To Örebro University

oru.seÖrebro universitets publikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 12 of 12
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Health and Caring Sciences, Medical Education, Linköping University, Linköping, SE, Sweden.
    Valeskog, Karin
    Department of Medicine, Health and Caring Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy Linköping University, Linköping, SE, Sweden.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Department of Medicine, Health and Caring Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy Linköping University, Linköping, SE, Sweden.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Understanding clinical reasoning: A phenomenographic study with entry-level physiotherapy students2022Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 38, nr 13, s. 2817-2826Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Entry-level students' conceptualizations of clinical reasoning can provide a starting point for program planning related to clinical reasoning development with a focus on patient-centered care.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study is to explore how physiotherapy students understand clinical reasoning midway through their education. Nine physiotherapy students were interviewed at the end of their third semester.

    METHODS: Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted, recorded and transcribed verbatim. A phenomenographic approach to qualitative data analysis, seeking to explore variations in students' conceptions was applied.

    RESULTS: The students' ways of understanding clinical reasoning could be described as: 1) the cognitive process of the physiotherapist; and 2) the relational process of the collaborative partnership between the physiotherapist and the patient. A contrastive analysis shows how the cognitive and relational perspectives are developed through the relationships among three dimensions of clinical reasoning: 1) problem-solving; 2) context of working; and 3) own learning.

    CONCLUSION: By identifying the critical variation in students' conceptions of clinical reasoning, focus can be placed on pedagogical arrangements to facilitate students' progression toward a person-centered approach.

  • 2.
    Anens, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Isabell
    Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Lena
    Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Region Örebro County, University Research Health Care Centre, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hellström, Karin
    Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Validity and reliability of physical activity measures in multiple sclerosis2023Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 39, nr 1, s. 137-153Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose was to evaluate the psychometric properties of physical activity measures in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS).

    METHODS: Adults with multiple sclerosis were recruited, n = 30 (validation) and n = 57 (test-retest). Steps measured with PiezoRX, Yamax SW200 and ActiGraph GT9X Link (AGlink) and time in different positions measured with AGlink were validated against data from video analysis. Psychometric properties of the Physical Activity and Disability Survey - Revised Swedish version (PADS-R(Sw)) was evaluated.

    RESULTS: The most valid measures were AGlink using the low-frequency extension filter, and PiezoRX with median absolute percentage errors (MeAPEs) of 0.9-3.1% and 1.3-3.3%. The MeAPEs were higher for Yamax SW200 (2.9-21.0%), AGlink display (3.6-44.8%) and AGlink normal filter (8.9-48.9%), indicating low validity. AGlink was not valid in measurements of sitting (MeAPE 12.0-12.5%) or lying (MeAPE 31.0-41.7%). The correlation between PADS-R(Sw) and AGlink steps was r = 0.492 (p = .009). The relative reliability of PADS-R(Sw) was ICC2,1 0.85 (CI 0.76-0.91), and absolute reliability was SEM 0.54.

    CONCLUSION: AGlink and PiezoRX were valid measures of steps in PwMS. The questionnaire PADS-R(Sw) was valid, with high relative reliability, but its absolute reliability was unsatisfactory.

  • 3.
    Arvidsson Lindvall, Mialinn
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. University Health Care Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Appelros, Peter
    Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Validity and test-retest reliability of the six-spot step test in persons after stroke2020Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 36, nr 1, s. 211-218Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: After stroke, asymmetric weight distribution is common with decreased balance control in standing and walking. The six-spot step test (SSST) includes a 5-m walk during which one leg shoves wooden blocks out of circles marked on the floor, thus assessing the ability to take load on each leg. The aim of the present study was to investigate the convergent and discriminant validity and test-retest reliability of the SSST in persons with stroke.

    METHODS: Eighty-one participants were included. A cross-sectional study was performed, in which the SSST was conducted twice, 3-7 days apart. Validity was investigated using measures of dynamic balance and walking. Reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient, standard error of the measurement (SEM), and smallest real difference (SRD).

    RESULTS: The convergent validity was strong to moderate, and the test-retest reliability was good. The SEM% was 14.7%, and the SRD% was 40.8% based on the mean of four walks shoving twice with the paretic and twice with the non-paretic leg.

    CONCLUSION: Values on random measurement error were high affecting the use of the SSST for follow-up evaluations but the SSST can be a complementary measure of gait and balance.

  • 4.
    Fors, Maria
    et al.
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Activity and Health in Linköping, and Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schröder, Karin
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för beteende-, social- och rättsvetenskap. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hedevik, Henrik
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Are illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement mediators of treatment effect in best practice physiotherapy low back pain care? Secondary mediation analyses in the BetterBack trial2023Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, s. 1-14Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: A best practice physiotherapy model of care (BetterBack MoC) for low back pain (LBP) aimed to improve patients' illness perceptions and self-care enablement, according to the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM).

    OBJECTIVE: To confirm if illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement, in line with the CSM, are mediators of treatment effects on disability and pain of the BetterBack MoC for patients with LBP compared to routine primary care. A secondary aim was to explore if illness perceptions and patient self-care enablement are mediators of guideline adherent care.

    METHODS: Pre-planned single mediation analyses tested whether hypothesized mediators at 3 months mediated the treatment effect of the MoC (n = 264) compared to routine care (n = 203) on disability and pain at 6 months. Secondary mediation analyses compared guideline adherent care with non-adherent care.

    RESULTS: No indirect effects were identified. The BetterBack intervention did not have superior effects over routine care on the hypothesized mediators. Illness perceptions and self-care enablement were significantly associated with disability and pain at 6 months. Secondary analyses showed significant indirect effects of guideline adherent care through tested mediators.

    CONCLUSION: Despite no indirect effects, patients' illness perceptions and self-care enablement were associated with disability and back pain intensity outcomes and are potentially relevant treatment targets.

  • 5.
    Hammer, Ann
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pepa, Helena
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Evaluation of therapeutic riding (Sweden)/hippotherapy (United States): a single-subject experimental design study replicated in eleven patients with multiple sclerosis2005Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 51-77Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether therapeutic riding (TR, Sweden) hippotherapy (HT, United States) may affect balance, gait, spasticity, functional strength, coordination, pain, self-rated level of muscle tension (SRLMT), activities of daily living (ADL), and health-related quality of life. Eleven patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were studied in a single-subject experimental design iSSED) study, type A-B-A. The intervention comprised ten weekly TR/HT sessions of 30 minutes each. The subjects were measured a maximum of 13 times. Physical tests were: the Berg balance scale, talking a figure of eight, the timed up and go test, 10 m walking, the modified Ashworth scale, the Index of Muscle Function, the Birgitta Lindmark motor assessment, part B, and individual measurements. Self-rated measures were. the Visual Analog Scale for pain, a scale for SRLMT, the Patient-Specific Functional Scale for ADL, and the SF-36. Data were analyzed visually, semi-statistically and considering clinical significance. Results showed improvement for ten subjects in one or more of the variables, particularly balance, and some improvements were also seen in pain, muscle tension, and ADL. Changes in SF-36 were mostly positive, with an improvement in Role-Emotional seen in eight patients. Conclusively, balance and Role-Emotional were the variables most often improved, but TR/HT appeared to benefit the subjects differently.

  • 6.
    Holopainen, Riikka
    et al.
    Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyvaskyla, Finland.
    Piirainen, Arja
    Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyvaskyla, Finland.
    Karppinen, Jaro
    Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    O'Sullivan, Peter
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    An adventurous learning journey: Physiotherapists' conceptions of learning and integrating cognitive functional therapy into clinical practice2022Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 38, nr 2, s. 309-326Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent low back pain guidelines recommend a BPS approach to the management of disabling low back pain. However, the most effective way of teaching physiotherapists to implement these approaches remains unknown. The present qualitative study aimed to explore physiotherapists' conceptions of learning and integrating Cognitive Functional Therapy (CFT) into clinical practice in Finnish primary health care.

    Methods: We interviewed 22 physiotherapists, who participated in four to six days of CFT workshops. A phenomenographic approach was used to explore the variation in the physiotherapists' conceptions of this process.

    Results: Four themes emerged from the data: 1) membership of work community; 2) learning journey; 3) transition to new working methods; and 4) professional role as a physiotherapist. These themes varied in four categories of description: recognizing difference of the new approach, toward integrating the new approach, waking up to explore, commitment to new approach and expanding application of new approach. The critical aspects between the categories that enabled the integration of CFT into clinical practice were ability to overcome resistance and to change views, being shaken and ability to critically reflect on one's work, support from the work community and becoming convinced, creativity, multidisciplinary collaboration and continuous learning.

    Conclusion: The participants' responses to the training varied greatly, suggesting that for some, the training was insufficient to support adequate changes in their practice behavior; whereas for others, the training was a life changing experience.

  • 7.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. School of Health Sciences, Department of Medical Diagnostics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Biomedical Platform, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Validation of two self-reported physical activity instruments against accelerometer data in patients undergoing lung cancer surgery2022Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 38, nr 13, s. 3119-3125Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Finding ways of identifying patients with low levels of physical activity after lung cancer surgery would be beneficial when planning and providing interventions aimed at increasing physical activity.

    PURPOSE: To validate two self-reported physical activity instruments against accelerometer data.

    METHODS: Self-reported physical activity was assessed with the four category One Month Physical Activity Question (OMPAQ) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire modified for the elderly (IPAQ-E). Objective measurement of physical activity was performed with the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer. All measurements were performed three months after lung cancer surgery.

    RESULTS: Three months after surgery, 83 patients provided complete physical activity measurements. There were statistically significant correlations between both of the self-reported physical activity assessed by OMPAQ (r = 0.54, p < .01) as well as IPAQ-E (r = 0.50, p < .01) and objectively measured physical activity (steps/day). The correlations were consistently stronger for the higher intensities of physical activity. Both instruments could identify patients not reaching the recommended levels of physical activity.

    CONCLUSION: Both OMPAQ and IPAQ-E give valid information on physical activity after lung cancer surgery, and might be used for screening patients in clinical settings. The OMPAQ provided stronger correlation and specificity than the IPAQ-E, and might be the preferred clinical choice.

  • 8.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, University Health Care Research Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Reeve, Julie
    School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, AUT University, Northcote, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Physiotherapy provided for patients undergoing thoracic surgery in Sweden - a national survey of practice2023Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, s. 1-7Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing thoracic surgery commonly receive perioperative physio-therapy, typically consisting of education, mobilization, breathing exercises, and mobility exercises. To date, no study has described physiotherapy practice for patients undergoing thoracic surgery in Sweden.

    PURPOSE: To investigate physiotherapy interventions for patients undergoing thoracic surgery in Sweden.

    METHODS: All physiotherapists currently working in thoracic surgery units in Sweden (n = 8) were eligible to participate. A survey was e-mailed to the physiotherapists, to determine physiotherapy interventions offered to patients undergoing thoracoscopy or open thoracic surgery. Of 21 physiotherapists, 13 (62%) responded, representing seven hospitals.

    RESULTS: Physiotherapists reported routinely providing preoperative education and postoperative treatment for all patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Breathing exercises and mobilization were usually initiated on the day of surgery or the first postoperative day. Common treatments were deep breathing exercises, with or without positive expiratory pressure, and airway clearance techniques. Upper limb and shoulder exercises were typically initiated on the first or second day after surgery. The most important factor reported to influence treatment choice was personal experience of the attending physiotherapist. No routine post-discharge rehabilitation was provided.

    CONCLUSION: Physiotherapists in Sweden reported routinely treating patients scheduled for thoracic surgery, both pre and postoperatively. Prehabilitation or post-discharge rehabilitation was not routinely provided.

  • 9.
    Klässbo, Maria
    et al.
    Centre for Clinical Research, Säffle, Sweden.
    Nordström, Kicki
    Smärthjälpen, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lillemor A.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wadensjö, Helene V.
    Department of Health Scienes, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    I exercise to postpone death: Interviews with persons with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis who are attending an osteoarthritis school2022Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 38, nr 11, s. 1667-1682Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity (PA) and exercise constitute the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Even though the symptoms may vary, OA should be considered a chronic disease and therefore PA and exercise should be performed lifelong. That needs knowledge and motivation.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and create a deeper understanding of the motivational processes for PA and exercise for persons with hip and/or knee OA who have participated in a self-management program OA school that included long-term exercise supervised by physical therapists.

    Methods: Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 participants recruited from the OA school at a Physical Therapy Rehabilitation Clinic in Sweden. The interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The analysis resulted in one main theme, Developing health literacy to encourage motivational processes for PA and exercise in OA and four themes: 1) meeting an established self-management program; 2) carrying my life history; 3) understanding the intelligence of the body; and 4) growing in existential motivation.

    Conclusion: Motivation for being physically active and to exercise, the life history in relation to PA and what creates existential motivation are important areas to ask questions about when people come to OA schools. Knowledge about the signals of the body connected to OA should be implemented in OA schools in order to motivate people to live an active life despite OA. Health literacy and the awareness of how PA can postpone death are likely to be important for existential motivation. 

  • 10.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Carling, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health , Örebro University , Örebro , Sweden.
    Davidsson, Oskar
    NeuroRehab, Nyköping Hospital, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Franzén, Lisbeth
    NeuroRehab, Nyköping Hospital, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Comparison of trunk impairment scale versions 1.0 and 2.0 in people with multiple sclerosis: A validation study2017Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, nr 10, s. 772-779Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Trunk control impairment often accompanies multiple sclerosis (MS). Trunk stability is necessary for movements of extremities, as are selective trunk movements for normal gait. Measuring trunk function is thus of interest.

    Methods: We examined the relationships between the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS1.0 and TIS2.0) and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), 5 sit-to-stand test (5STS), Timed Up and Go test (TUG), 10-m timed walk test (10TW), 2-min walk test (2MWT), Falls Efficacy Scale - International, and 12-item MS Walking Scale (MSWS-12) in 47 outpatients. We determined construct validity by calculating the degree to which the TIS versions produced different scores between known groups: use or nonuse of walking aid, MS disability status, and whether participants experienced a fall or not during 14 weeks.

    Results: TIS correlated moderately with BBS and 5STS; moderately (TIS1.0) or weakly (TIS2.0) with TUG, 10TW, and 2MWT; and weakly to moderately with MSWS-12 in subgroups with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) > 6.0. No other clear correlation patterns were found. TIS did not discriminate between known groups.

    Conclusions: TIS1.0 is recommended for individuals with MS (EDSS score 4.0-7.5). Better trunk function correlates with better balance and walking ability. TIS has limited value in fall risk screening.

  • 11.
    Rådman, Lisa
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Family Medicine Research Centre, , Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Modified Rivermead Mobility Index: a reliable measure in people within 14 days post-stroke2015Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 31, nr 2, s. 126-129Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The reliability of the Modified Rivermead Mobility Index (MRMI) has not previously been investigated in the very early post-stroke phase. The aim of the study was to evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability and internal consistency in patients, 1-14 d post-stroke.

    Method: A cohort study with repeated measures within 24 h, on 37 patients, 1-14 d post-stroke was conducted. Inter-rater (two raters) and intra-rater (one rater) reliability was analyzed using weighted kappa (kappa) statistics and internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha and intra-class correlation (ICC), 3.k.

    Results: Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability was excellent (ICC coefficient 0.97 and 0.99) for MRMI summary score. Intra-rater exact agreement for separate items was between 77% and 97%; kappa between 0.81 and 0.96. Inter-rater exact agreement for separate items was between 68% and 92%; kappa 0.59-0.87. The internal consistency was high (alpha 0.96; ICC 3.k 0.99). Conclusion: The MRMI is a reliable measure of physical mobility in the early post-stroke phase.

  • 12.
    Sahlander, Carina
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Monica
    Department of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bejerot, Susanne
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section Psychiatry, St. Göran Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Motor function in adults with Asperger's disorder: a comparative study2008Inngår i: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 73-81Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the original description of Asperger's disorder (AD), clumsiness was an associated feature. Several studies of children have shown deficits in motor control, whereas research regarding adults is scarce. The aim of the present study was to compare motor function in adults with AD, with a normal comparison group. Gross and fine motor skills were examined by a standardized, norm referenced test developed for children, but also used in young adults, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP). In addition, a questionnaire regarding the participants' physical activity during leisure time was administered. We found that adults (age 21-35) with AD (N = 15) performed significantly worse than the normal comparison group (N = 29) in six of eight subtests in the BOTMP. Males with AD were less physically active than males in the comparison group. Among females, physical activity did not differ between the groups. There was a positive association between physical activity and gross motor function in the AD group. Participants with AD were encouraged by the assessments. Physical coaching may be an important future field for improving quality of life in adults with AD.

1 - 12 of 12
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf