oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Patients’ experiences of lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to World Health Organization about 75% of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer could be prevented if the risk factors tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol could be eliminated. Patients often need help in monitoring themselves to make the proper lifestyle changes and it is important that adequate support is provided to enable the patients to take control over their health. Motivational interviewing is a framework that can help to facilitate this movement. The aim of this study was to describe how patients in primary health care settings experience lifestyle discussions based on motivationalinterviewing.

    Methods This study has a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used as the method. Sixteen patients who had each visited a registered nurse for lifestyle discussions were interviewed.

    Results The results show that the lifestyle discussions could enable self-determination in the process oflifestyle change but that certain conditions were required. Mutual interaction between the patient and the nurse that contributes to a sense of well-being in the patients was a necessary condition for the lifestyle discussion to be helpful. When the discussion resulted in a new way of thinking about lifestyle and when patient initiative was encouraged,the discussion could contribute to change. The patient’s free will to make a lifestyle change and the nurse’s sensitivity in the discussions created fertile soil for change.

    Conclusions This study focuses on MI-based discussions, and the result shows that a subset of patients, who self reported that they are motivated and aware of their role in making lifestyle changes, appreciate these strategies. However, it is not known whether discussions would be experienced in the same way if RNs used another method or if patients who were less motivated, engaged, or aware of their role in making lifestyle changes were interviewed.

  • 2.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Skills Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tensions in learning professional identities - nursing students' narratives and participation in practical skills during their clinical practice: an ethnographic study2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, article id 48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice is a pivotal part of nursing education. It provides students with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have acquired from lectures into practice with real patients, under the guidance of registered nurses. Clinical experience is also essential for shaping the nursing students' identity as future professional nurses. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the ways in which students learn practical skills and apply knowledge within and across different contexts, i.e. how they apply clinical skills, learnt in the laboratory in university settings, in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how nursing students describe, and use, their prior experiences related to practical skills during their clinical practice.

    METHODS: An ethnographic case study design was used. Fieldwork included participant observations (82 h), informal conversations, and interviews (n = 7) that were conducted during nursing students' (n = 17) clinical practice at an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden.

    RESULTS: The overarching theme identified was "Learning about professional identities with respect to situated power". This encompasses tensions in students' learning when they are socialized into practical skills in the nursing profession. This overarching theme consists of three sub-themes: "Embodied knowledge", "Divergent ways of assessing and evaluating knowledge" and "Balancing approaches".

    CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students do not automatically possess the ability to transfer knowledge from one setting to another; rather, their development is shaped by their experiences and interactions with others when they meet real patients. The study revealed different ways in which students navigated tensions related to power differentials. Reflecting on actions is a prerequisite for developing and learning practical skills and professional identities. This highlights the importance of both educators' and the preceptors' roles for socializing students in this process.

  • 3.
    Gillespie, Brigid M.
    et al.
    School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast QLD, Australia; Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Gold Coast QLD, Australia; National Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing, Griffith University, Gold Coast QLD, Australia.
    Harbeck, Emma B.
    National Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing, Griffith University, Gold Coast QLD, Australia; Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast QLD, Australia.
    Falk-Brynhildsen, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jaensson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Perceptions of perioperative nursing competence: a cross-country comparison2018In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 17, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Throughout many countries, professional bodies rely on yearly self-assessment of competence for ongoing registration; therefore, nursing competence is pivotal to safe clinical practice. Our aim was to describe and compare perioperative nurses' perceptions of competence in four countries, while examining the effect of specialist education and years of experience in the operating room.

    Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional surveys from four countries including; Australia, Canada, Scotland, and Sweden. The 40-item Perceived Perioperative Competence Scale-Revised (PPCS-R), was used with a total sample of 768 respondents. We used a factorial design to examine the influence of country, years of experience in the operating room and specialist education on nurses' reported perceived perioperative competence.

    Results: Regardless of country origin, nurses with specialist qualifications reported higher perceived perioperative competence when compared to nurses without specialist education. However, cross-country differences were dependent on nurses' number of years of experience in the operating room. Nurses from Sweden with 6-10 years of experience in the operating room reported lower perceived perioperative competence when compared to Australian nurses. In comparing nurses with >10 years of experience, Swedish nurses reported significantly lower perceived perioperative competence when compared to nurses from Australia, Canada and Scotland.

    Conclusion: Researchers need to consider educational level and years of experience in the perioperative context when examining constructs such as competence.

  • 4.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    A meaningful daily life in nursing homes - a place of shelter and a space of freedom: a participatory appreciative action reflection study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Shortcomings in elderly care have been reported in many parts of the world, including Sweden. However, national guidelines for elderly care have been introduced in Sweden, which contain core values and local guarantees of dignity. These highlight the need for dignity and well-being, and organising the older person’s daily life so that they perceive it as meaningful. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe older persons’ experience and knowledge about obstacles, opportunities and solutions to developing a meaningful daily life for those living in nursing homes.

    Methods

    This study combined the Participatory Appreciative Action Reflection (PAAR) and hermeneutic approaches. Twenty-five older persons participated and persons with dementia or cognitive impairments were included. Repeated interviews were carried out as reflective conversations, leaving 50 interviews in total, wherein the older persons provided their analyses and reflections on a meaningful daily life. Finally, an analysis of the data was completed based on a life-world hermeneutic approach.

    Results

    We identified five tentative interpretations that describe obstacles, opportunities and solutions for a meaningful daily life. Themes 2 and 4 outline obstacles for a meaningful daily life, and Themes 1, 3 and 5 describe opportunities and solutions for a meaningful daily life: (1) Having space to be yourself; (2) No space to be yourself; (3) Belonging and security; (4) A feeling of insecurity; and (5) Longing for something to happen. In the main interpretation, we found that the five tentative interpretations are related to Tuan’s concepts of space and place, where place can be described as security and stableness, and space as freedom and openness.

    Conclusions

    The reciprocal relationship is a solution for a meaningful daily life and occurs in the interaction between staff and older persons in nursing homes. It is the balance of power, and constitutes a place of shelter and a space of freedom for a meaningful daily life. The older person must have balance between shelter and freedom to have a meaningful daily life.

  • 5.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Fredrik
    Region Örebro Counties, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lövbrand, Conny
    Ambulance Department, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gifford, Mervyn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. The Centre of Women’s Health, Faculty of Health Science, Buskerud Vestfold University College, Kongsberg, Norway.
    A Decision support system (DSS) for municipal nurses encountering health deterioration among older people2016In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Backgrund: This study is part of a larger project called ViSam and includes testing of a decision support system developed and adapted for older people on the basis of M (R) ETTS (Rapid Emergency Triage and Treatment System). The system is designed to allow municipal nurses to determine the optimal level of care for older people whose health has deteriorated. This new system will allow more structured assessment, the patient should receive optimal care and improved data transmission to the next caregiver.

    Methods: This study has an explanatory approach, commencing with quantitative data collection phase followed by qualitative data arising from focus group discussions over the RNs professional experience using the Decision Support system. Focus group discussions were performed to complement the quantitative data to get a more holistic view of the decision support system.

    Results: Using elements of the decision support system (vital parameters for saturation, pain and affected general health) together with the nurses' decision showed that 94 % of the older persons referred to hospital were ultimately hospitalized. Nurses felt that they worked more systematically, communicated more effectively with others and felt more professional when using the decision support system.

    Conclusions: The results of this study showed that, with the help of a decision support system, the correct patients are sent to the Emergency Department from municipal home care. Unnecessary referrals of older patients that might lead to poorer health, decreased well-being and confusion can thus be avoided. Using the decision support system means that healthcare co-workers (nurses, ambulance/emergency department/district doctor/SOS alarm) begin to communicate more optimally. There is increased understanding leading to the risk of misinterpretation being reduced and the relationship between healthcare co-workers is improved. However, the decision support system requires more extensive testing in order to enhance the evidence base relating to the vital parameters among older people and the use of the decision support system.

  • 6.
    Manninen, Katri
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Elisabet Welin
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Science, Department of Education, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Supervisors' pedagogical role at a clinical education ward: an ethnographic study2015In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice is essential for health care students. The supervisor's role and how supervision should be organized are challenging issues for educators and clinicians. Clinical education wards have been established to meet these challenges and they are units with a pedagogical framework facilitating students' training in real clinical settings. Supervisors support students to link together theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. From students' perspectives, clinical education wards have shown potential to enhance students' learning. Thus there is a need for deeper understanding of supervisors' pedagogical role in this context. We explored supervisors' approaches to students' learning at a clinical education ward where students are encouraged to independently take care of patients.

    METHOD: An ethnographic approach was used to study encounters between patients, students and supervisors. The setting was a clinical education ward for nursing students at a university hospital. Ten observations with ten patients, 11 students and five supervisors were included in the study. After each observation, individual follow-up interviews with all participants and a group interview with supervisors were conducted. Data were analysed using an ethnographic approach.

    RESULTS: Supervisors' pedagogical role has to do with balancing patient care and student learning. The students were given independence, which created pedagogical challenges for the supervisors. They handled these challenges by collaborating as a supervisory team and taking different acts of supervision such as allowing students their independence, being there for students and by applying patient-centredness.

    CONCLUSION: The supervisors' pedagogical role was perceived as to facilitate students' learning as a team. Supervisors were both patient- and student-centred by making a nursing care plan for the patients and a learning plan for the students. The plans were guided by clinical and pedagogical guidelines, individually adjusted and followed up.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf