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  • 1.
    Brunt, David
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Residents' Perceptions of Quality in Supported Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 697-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The residents' perspective of the quality of housing support for people with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing has been studied and a comparison has been made with the findings from those from a previous study in ordinary housing with outreach support. One-hundred and seventy-eight residents from 27 supported housing facilities in eight Swedish municipalities completed the Quality of Psychiatric Care-Housing (QPC-H) instrument. The highest quality ratings were found for: Secluded Environment, Encounter and Support, while Participation, Housing Specific and Secure Environment were rated at lower levels. Despite relatively high ratings, a majority of items did not attain the 80% cutoff point deemed as defining satisfactory quality of service. The residents in ordinary housing with outreach support rated higher levels for the majority of the QPC-H dimensions in comparison with those in supported housing. A conclusion is that the quality of care in supported housing facilities has a number of deficiencies that need to be addressed. Supported housing is generally rated as having a lower quality of care than in ordinary housing with outreach support. Suggestions for the content of staff training are made based on the results.

  • 2.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lützén, Kim
    Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Gjövik University College, Gjövik, Norway.
    A lonely life journey bordered with struggle: being a sibling of an individual with psychosis2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that siblings of individuals with severe mental illness are affected by the situation of their affected sibling and that the health care services seem to partly fail in meeting their needs for support. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how siblings of individuals with a psychotic illness, and who have participated in a support group, experience their situation. Thirteen informants participated in focus group interviews, which were analysed by inductive content analysis. The findings were interpreted in an overall single theme: A lonely life journey bordered with struggle. This theme consists of three categories: facing existential thoughts, facing ambiguity in approach and engagement, and facing disparate attitudes and expectations.

  • 3.
    Hylén, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.
    Engström, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.
    Engström, Karin
    School of Culture and Education, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pelto-Piri, Veikko
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center.
    Providing Good Care in the Shadow of Violence: An Interview Study with Nursing Staff and Ward Managers in Psychiatric Inpatient Care in Sweden2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 148-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe the nursing staff and ward managers' experiences of safety and violence in everyday meetings with the patients. The qualitative content analyses resulted in four themes: the relationship with the patient is the basis of care; the organizational culture affects the care given; knowledge and competence are important for safe care; and the importance of balancing influence and coercion in care. The staff had a varied ability to meet patients in a respectful way. One way of creating a common approach could be to discuss and reflect upon different options in the meeting with the patient.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård, Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sverige; Sektionen för sykepleie, Högskolen i Gjövik, Gjövik, Norge.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Vårdvetenskapligt forskningscentrum, Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sverige.
    Åhlin, Arne
    Margretelunds Ungdomshem, Statens Institutionsstyrelse (National Board of Institutional Care), Lidköping, Sverige.
    Mothers' Everyday Experiences of Having an Adult Child Who Suffers from Long-Term Mental Illness2010In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 692-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to describe everyday life experiences of mothers who have an adult child with a long-term mental illness. Sixteen mothers were interviewed. A content analysis resulted in one main theme: My adult child who is struggling with mental illness is always on my mind, and three subthemes: (1) living a life under constant strain, (2) living with an emotional burden, and (3) seeing light in the darkness despite difficulties. Knowledge of mothers’ everyday life experiences is of great importance in order to support them and thereby increase the possibility of these mothers being a source of strength for their child.

  • 5.
    Johansson, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Division of Psychiatry, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Vårdvetenskapligt forskningscentrum, Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sweden.
    Åhlin, Arne
    Margretelunds Ungdomshem, Statens Institutionsstyrelse (National Board of Institutional Care), Lidköping, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, NTNU (Norges teknisk-naturvetenskapliga universitet), Gjøvik, Norway; Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fathers’ everyday experiences of having an adult child who suffers from long-term mental illness2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe the everyday life experiences of fathers of adult children who have various forms of long-term mental illness. Ten fathers were interviewed. Content analysis revealed one main theme: Maintaining a strong façade while balancing on a thin line, and two sub-themes: (1) A constant struggle and (2) A feeling of powerlessness. The fathers demonstrated great engagement and good will to participate in their child's life. A sense of powerlessness and frustration at not having or being allowed freedom of action emerged. Cooperation between children, parents, the care service providers, and the authorities could increase the parents’ abilities to provide adequate support to the child as well as helping them to understand and make the incomprehensible manageable.

  • 6.
    Rask, Mikael
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjövik, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Residents' View of Quality in Ordinary Housing with Housing Support for People With Psychiatric Disabilities2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 132-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the quality of housing support provided in housing services for people with psychiatric disabilities living in ordinary housing with housing support from the residents' perspective, by using the QPC-H instrument. A sample of 174 residents in ordinary housing, receiving housing support from 22 housing support services in nine Swedish municipalities, participated in this study. The results show that the quality of psychiatric care in housing services was mainly rated highly as measured with the QPC-H instrument. The dimensions Encounter and Secluded Environment were the aspects that were rated as the two with the highest quality of housing service. The dimensions Participation and Secure Environment were rated as those with the lowest quality. There were more residents who totally disagreed with the statements in the dimensions Participation and Housing Specific than in the other dimensions. The perceived lower quality in Encounter, Participation, Support and the Housing Specific dimensions was associated with a low frequency of psychiatric outpatient clinic contacts. A conclusion is that the support staff could be more observant regarding the residents' need for support and also talk more with them about what could be done to assist them. It also seems important that the support staff discuss with the residents regarding how they can help them to feel more secure in their accommodation.

  • 7.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    An integrative review of what contributes to personal recovery in psychiatric disabilities2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this integrated literature review is to identify what people with psychiatric disabilities experience as contributing to their personal recovery. The study design is based on Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review and includes 14 qualitative peer-reviewed articles. The analysis reveals three main themes: recovery as an inner process; recovery as a contribution from others; and recovery as participating in social and meaningful activities. If mental health nurses adhere to the personal recovery perspective, nursing practice will focus on the patients' needs, conveying hope and supporting the patient in the recovery process.

  • 8.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Department of Acute Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway; School of Health and Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Panoptic power and mental health nursing-space and surveillance in relation to staff, patients and neutral places2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 500-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health nurses use manifest and latent approaches for surveillance and observation of patients in the context of mental health care. Patient spaces in mental health organizations are subtly linked to these different means of surveillance. This article investigates these approaches, focusing in particular on the variety of spaces patients occupy and differences in the intensity of observation that can be carried out in them. The aim is to elaborate on space and surveillance in relation to the patients’ and nurses’ environment in psychiatric nursing care. Places where patients were observed were operationalized and categorized, yielding three spaces: those for patients, those for staff, and neutral areas. We demonstrate that different spaces produce different practices in relation to the exercise of panoptic power and that there is room for maneuvering and engaging in alternatives to “keeping an eye on patients” for nurses in mental health nursing. Some spaces offer asylum from panoptic observations and the viewing eyes of psychiatric nurses, but the majority of spaces in mental health nursing serve as a field of visibility within which the patient is constantly watched.

  • 9.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. School of Health and Sciences, Dalarna University , Falun, Sweden.
    Lützén, Kim
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalens University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability: cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units2011In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 255-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  • 10.
    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Institute of Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Institute of Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway; Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of South-Eastern Norway (USN), Notodden, Norway.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Faculty of Medicine and Health, Institute of Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway; University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Moen, Øyfrid Larsen
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Institute of Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Mental Health Professionals' Experiences with Applying a Family-Centred Care Focus in Their Clinical Work2020In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family members play vital roles in supporting their young adults with mental health challenges, implying that professionals are challenged to apply a Family-Centred Care approach (FCC) in community mental health services. By applying a qualitative phenomengraphic approach, this study aimed to explore and describe professionals' experiences of applying a FCC approach. Based on data from 13 individual interviews, the descriptive categories were: Mutual understanding, Facing dilemmas and Dealing with barriers. Despite the professionals' expressed desires to involve the family, individual treatment and follow-up seemed to characterize their daily clinical practice, often due to the young adults' own wishes.

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