oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wicander, Gudrun
    Karlstad universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Development as Freedom: how the Capability Approach can be used in ICT4D Research and Practice2012In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Increasing interactivity in distance educations: Case studies Bangladesh and Sri Lanka2010In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 16-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how distance educations in developing countries can enhance interactivityby means of information and communication technologies. It is argued that e-learning involvesa shift in the educational structure from traditional transmission of knowledge to interactivecreation of knowledge. Our case studies are two distance educations in Bangladesh and SriLanka that use different technologies for implementing interactivity; Internet and computersin one case and video and mobile phones in the other. The findings are analyzed based onStructuration Theory and we compare the two approaches based on emerging norms andbeliefs. Findings from both cases show the concurrent enactment of both the transmissionand the interactive structure. Whereas peer collaboration and the use of self-assessment toolsmake students take more ownership of their learning, we also found the idea of a classroomwith an instructive teacher to be deeply rooted in the students’ minds.

  • 3.
    Grönlund, Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Islam, Yousuf M.
    Daffodil Int Univ, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    A mobile e-learning environment for developing countries: The Bangladesh Virtual Interactive Classroom2010In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 244-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a project working to improve distance education in Bangladesh by means of a low-cost, large-scale interactive learning environment using video, mobile phones, SMS-based tools administered in a Learning Management System, and innovative pedagogy based on the student-centred learning model. The paper addresses the question of, how to use existing mobile telephony technical infrastructure to create interactive learning environments which can reach the majority of the population, be able to include many thousand students, and be sustainable from a resource perspective including the operational model of institutions providing education. This question includes challenges relating to pedagogy and teaching methods, technical tools for learning and communication, and institutional arrangements. The paper addresses these challenges by the illustrative case of the Bangladesh Virtual Interactive Classroom testing the tools and ideas in course at Bangladesh Open University (BOU). We find that our tools are feasible and usable but also that sustainability requires meeting organizational and social challenges. This research contributes by providing the first LMS that can be fully used from standard mobile phones and by showing how to arrange low-cost distance tuition with only minimal ICT infrastructure, an example transferable to other developing countries.

  • 4.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Lagsten, Jenny
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The capability approach as a tool for development evaluation: analyzing students' use of internet resources2012In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet resources have been ascribed transformative powers in the development of educational organizations and students in developing regions. However, most development projects relating to Internet resources focus on publishing material without much analysis of the actual use. The question then is how we can go deeper in our analysis and study actual development outcomes. The analysis in this paper is based on Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach where both the means and ends are evaluated. The research question is “What are the benefits of using Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach when evaluating development outcomes?”. We answer the question by evaluating what capabilities and functionings Internet resources can enable for students in higher education. Findings show that the Capability Approach enables us to gain a deeper understanding of why and how development outcomes are achieved. We are also able to follow the development process from the intervention to the realized outcomes. 

  • 5.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Bangladesh calling: farmers' technology use practices as a driver for development2011In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making farmers in developing countries more informed about market opportunities is generally considered an important step toward development of the agricultural sector and increasing individual farmers' income. Mobile phones are a useful technology for delivering such information, but are farmers ready? According to Sen [Development as freedom. In J. Ezer (Ed.), Gandhi's third assassination: Information and communication technology education in India (pp. 201-212)], human capability is the basic driver for development. This paper investigates, by means of a survey (n  =  420) to farmers in rural Bangladesh, what factors affect mobile phone ownership and use and what professional information is asked for. We find that access is very high, to a large extent through community use. Neither education nor income is a determining factor, but “modernity” - being young and/or having children - is. Even the very poor have access. Attitudes are very positive not just to the phones, but also to using them for professional information services. Hence, human capacity for development is there, as is technology. What is still lacking is the useful services adapted to the rural usage patterns and social context.

  • 6.
    Sein, Maung K.
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden; Department of Information Systems, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway;.
    Thapa, Devinder
    Department of Information Systems, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sæbø, Øystein
    Department of Information Systems, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    A holistic perspective on the theoretical foundations for ICT4D research2018In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While many theories have guided research Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D), we are yet to construct a clear and coherent narrative that would help us answer the question of how ICT fosters development in underdeveloped communities. In this paper, we argue that one of the main reasons for this is that our holistic understanding of ICT4D is seldom grounded in theories to understand the core areas that define the field, namely, ICT, Development, and, ‘4’ which are the transformative processes that link the two. Through a brief literature review, we list theories that have informed ICT4D research in each of these areas. We present examples of theories, namely, Capability Approach, Affordances, and Actor-Network Theory together with Social Capital and illustrate how we have used them in our research. Building on this holistic perspective on theoretical foundation, we propose five agendas for ICT4D research.

  • 7. Watson, Richard T.
    et al.
    Kunene, K. Niki
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Frugal information systems (IS)2013In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 176-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of the factors contributing to a likely increase in austerity establishes the case for a greater emphasis on frugal information systems (IS), which is defined as an information system that is developed and deployed with minimal resources to meet the pre-eminent goal of the client. The U-constructs are adopted as a foundation for a frugal IS, and two simple messaging system-based case studies illustrate their application. Design guidelines and practices for frugal IS are considered. The challenges and potential gains of frugal IS are reviewed.

  • 8.
    Yingqin, Zheng
    et al.
    School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, UK.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sahay, Sundeep
    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Andersson, Annika
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Conceptualizing development in information and communication technology for development (ICT4D)2018In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICT4D research is faced with the challenge of rapidly changing technologies and increasingly complex social dynamics and development processes. We argue that ICT4D research requires a more acute sense of where our research is situated within a broader picture of development, e.g. with a better understanding of development processes, their ideological nature, the power structures and driving forces, and the mechanisms through which ICTs may be embedded in and shape these processes. Such a reflexivity is crucial not least in justifying our claims of contribution, but also in understanding the implications and potential impact of our research and practice. This editorial seeks to explore key conceptual components in ICT4D and their relationships, including dimensions of development, perspectives of development, conceptions of artefacts, and theory of change. A tentative conceptual schema is presented that connects these conceptual components.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf