oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Jansson, Markus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center.
    Cost-effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in elective cesarean section2018In: Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, ISSN 1478-7547, E-ISSN 1478-7547, Vol. 16, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The proportion of pregnant women delivered by cesarean section has increased steadily during the past three decades. The risk of infection is 10-fold augmented after elective cesarean section compared to vaginal delivery. Antibiotic prophylaxis may reduce endometritis by 62% and superficial wound infection by 38% after elective cesarean section. International guidelines recommend antibiotic prophylaxis in elective cesarean section, but this procedure is not routinely followed in Sweden. Studies of costs of antibiotic prophylaxis in cesarean section show conflicting results and are based on substantially different incidence of postoperative infections. No study of costs of antibiotic prophylaxis in elective cesarean section in a Swedish or Nordic context has been pursued. The aim of this study was to investigate if antibiotic prophylaxis is cost-reducing in elective cesarean section in orebro County, Sweden.

    Methods: All women undergoing elective cesarean in the Region orebro County health care system during 2011-2012 were eligible for inclusion. Postoperative infections and risk factors for infections were registered. A hypothetical situation in which all participants had received antibiotic prophylaxis was compared to the actual situation, in which none of them had received antibiotic prophylaxis. The reduction in the risk of postoperative infections resulting from antibiotic prophylaxis was based on a meta-analysis. Costs for in-patient care of postoperative infections were extracted from the accounting system, and costs for out-patient care were calculated according to standard costs. Costs for antibiotic prophylaxis were calculated and compared with the cost reduction that would be implied by the introduction of such prophylaxis.

    Results: The incidences of deep and superficial surgical site infection were 3.5% and 1.3% respectively. Introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis would reduce health care costs by 31 Euro per cesarean section performed (95% credible interval 4-58 Euro). The probability of cost-saving was 99%.

    Conclusions: Antibiotic prophylaxis in elective cesarean section is cost-reducing in this health care setting. Our results indicate that the introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in elective cesarean section can also be cost-saving in low infection rate settings.

    Trial registration Ethical approval was given by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Uppsala (registration number 2013/484).

  • 2.
    Philipsson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Public health, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Duberg, Anna
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Community Medicine and Public health, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Community Medicine and Public health.
    Cost-utility analysis of a dance intervention for adolescent girls with internalizing problems2013In: Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, ISSN 1478-7547, E-ISSN 1478-7547, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 4-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The increasing prevalence of psychological health problems among adolescent girls is alarming. Knowledge of beneficial effects of physical activity on psychological health is widespread. Dance is a popular formof exercise that could be a protective factor in preventing and treating symptoms of depression. The aim of thisstudy was to assess the cost-effectiveness of a dance intervention in addition to usual school health services foradolescent girls with internalizing problems, compared with usual school health services alone.

    Methods: A cost-utility analysis from a societal perspective based on a randomized controlled intervention trial wasperformed. The setting was a city in central Sweden with a population of 130 000. A total of 112 adolescent girls, 13–18 years old, with internalizing problems participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to intervention (n =59) or control (n = 53) group. The intervention comprised dance twice weekly during eight months in addition to usualschool health services. Costs for the stakeholder of the intervention, treatment effect and healthcare costs wereconsidered. Gained quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were used to measure the effects. Quality of life was measuredwith the Health Utility Index Mark 3. Cost-effectiveness ratios were based on the changes in QALYs and net costs forthe intervention group compared with the control group. Likelihood of cost-effectiveness was calculated.

    Results: At 20 months, quality of life had increased by 0.08 units more in the intervention group than in the controlgroup (P = .04), translating to 0.10 gained QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD $3,830 per QALYand the likelihood of cost-effectiveness was 95%.

    Conclusions: Intervention with dance twice weekly in addition to usual school health services may be consideredcost-effective compared with usual school health services alone, for adolescent girls with internalizing problems.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf