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  • 1.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Department of Public Health, Örebro County Council, Sweden, Örebro, Sweden; Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wallin, Anne-Marie
    Department of Public Health, Örebro County Council, Sweden, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Choice of food and food traditions in pre-war Bosnia-Herzegovina: focus goup interviews with immigrant women in Sweden2002In: Ethnicity and Health, ISSN 1355-7858, E-ISSN 1465-3419, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 149-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Immigrants in Sweden have on average poorer health than native Swedes, including the risk of nutritional problems. In Sweden's multicultural society there is a need for increased knowledge about eating habits in public health work within health and education. A survey of refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina living in Sweden was undertaken to describe the choice of food and food traditions in pre-war Bosnia. The purpose was to introduce the subject of food, health and migration into public health work and develop culture-adapted food and health advice.

    Design: Focus-group interviews were undertaken with a total of 20 women refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina.

    Results: Qualitative data analysis identified a large consumption of bread as a staple food with meat, vegetables, milk, cheese, legumes, egg and fish as additions. Self-sufficiency was noted with milk souring, jam making and the production of sweet fruit drinks. Home made cheese and drying or smoking of meat were common methods of food storage. In child rearing, breast-feeding for 6-8 months was most common. Home made breast milk replacements were made from semolina, rice and 'petit biscuits'.

    Conclusion: Several important factors need to be taken into account when giving culturally adapted food and health advice to Bosnian families, such as encouraging bread, vegetable and legume consumption and giving advice on substituting sweet fruit drinks for natural fruit. One should be conscious of how religious beliefs as well as socio-cultural, historical, ecological, economical and psychological influences may guide food choices.

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