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  • 1.
    Brudzinska-Kosior, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kosior, Grzegorz
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Klánová, Jana
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vanková, Lenka
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Kukucka, Petr
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Chropenová, Maria
    Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kolon, Krzysztof
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Mróz, Lucyna
    Department of Ecology, Biogeochemistry and Environmental Protection University, Wrocław, Poland.
    Kempers, Alexander J.
    Department of Environmental Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in herbaceous Centaurium erythraea affected by various sources of environmental pollution2015In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 50, no 13, p. 1369-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent xenobiotics with harmful effects on humans and wildlife. Their levels in the environment and accumulation in biota must be carefully controlled especially in species harvested from wild populations and commonly used as medicines. Our objective has been to determine PBDE concentrations (BDEs 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183 and 209) in Centaurium erythraea collected at sites with various levels of environmental pollution. PBDE congener profiles in C. erythraea were dominated by BDE209, which accounted for 47-89% of the total PBDE burden in the plants. Principal Component and Classification Analysis, which classifies the concentration of PBDEs in C. erythraea, allowed us to distinguish the pattern of these compounds characteristic for the origin of pollution: BDEs 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100 for lignite and general chemical industry and the vicinity of an expressway and BDEs 183 and 209 for a thermal power plant and ferrochrome smelting industry. Careful selection of sites with C. erythraea for medicinal purposes is necessary as this herb can accumulate PBDEs while growing at polluted sites.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Grahn, Evastina
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Sediment chronologies of As, Bi, and Ga in Sweden - impact of industrialisation2007In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acid-leachable amount and pore water concentration of As, Bi and Ga in sediment cores from four remote lakes in a south to north transect in Sweden were used to recapitulate the pollution history of the elements. The diagenetic impact on the element distribution was elucidated from their solid/solution partition and relationships to elements indicative for diagenesis. Dating was made by their acid-leachable lead content in combination with the Pb-206/Pb-207 ratio. In one of the lakes this approach was validated against dating with Pb-210. The impact of diagenesis on the sediment distribution of theses elements was found to be low enough for a chronological interpretation of the sediment profiles, as evidenced by their ratios to elements indicative of the geological background. A closer examination of the diagenetic impact would however be required if a more detailed chronology is desired. This study has demonstrated that atmospheric deposition of arsenic, bismuth and gallium contributes to the sediment inventory of these elements. The major part of the deposition of arsenic and bismuth took place after the Second World War. For gallium no concentrations exceeding background were detected before circa 1930. Increased levels of arsenic are traceable to circa 1850. For bismuth increased levels are concluded to extend before 1790, i.e., background concentrations were not reached in the present cores. For all elements the atmospheric deposition has been lower towards the north.

  • 3.
    Karlsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Düker, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Separation and quantification of Tl(I) and Tl(III) in fresh water samples2006In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1155-1167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two oxidation states of thallium, Tl(I) and Tl(III), were quantified by IC-ICP-MS using complexation of Tl3+ with DTPA (penta-carboxymethyl-diethylenetriamine) and separation on a cation exchange column according to a modification of the method devised by Coetzee et al. In order to avoid successively lowered separation efficiency and loss of resolution during a run, a gradient elution was made using HCl instead of HNO3. With an ultrasonic nebuliser instead of a V-groove nebuliser the limit of detection for Tl(I) and Tl(III) could be lowered from 25 ng/L and 3.0 ng/L to 9.0 ng/L and 0.7 ng/L, respectively, which is adequate for many fresh water systems. The stability of Tl(III) in acidic solutions was found to be concentration dependent, with an initially high reduction rate of Tl(III). Exposure of the sample to light further increased the reduction rate. Addition of DTPA (0.01 mM) and acid (HNO3, 1%) to a sample with 1 μg/L Tl(III) stabilised the Tl(III) content for at least 48 h. Analysis of field samples showed that only acidification is inadequate to maintain the original distribution of Tl(I) and Tl(III). Internal calibration (standard addition) and correction of the analytical signal (205Tl) with a non-ionic internal standard (11B) yielded almost quantitative recoveries of both Tl(I) and Tl(III). A scheme for field sample preparation is proposed, including sampling, storage and pre-analysis treatment.

  • 4.
    Rahman, Aminur
    et al.
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nahar, Noor
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nawani, Neelu N.
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Tathawade, Pune, India.
    Jass, Jana
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Desale, Prithviraj
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Tathawade, Pune, India.
    Kapadnis, Balu P.
    Department of Microbiology, University of Pune, Pune, India.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Saha, Ananda K.
    Department of Zoology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Ghosh, Sibdas
    School of Arts and Science, Iona College, New Rochelle, New York, USA.
    Olsson, Björn
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Mandal, Abul
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Isolation and characterization of a Lysinibacillus strain B1-CDA showing potential for bioremediation of arsenics from contaminated water2014In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 1349-1360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this study was to identify and isolate arsenic resistant bacteria that can be used for removing arsenic from the contaminated environment. Here we report a soil borne bacterium, B1-CDA that can serve this purpose. B1-CDA was isolated from the soil of a cultivated land in Chuadanga district located in the southwest region of Bangladesh. The morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA analysis suggested that the isolate belongs to Lysinibacillus sphaericus. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of the isolate is 500mM (As) as arsenate. TOF-SIMS and ICP-MS analysis confirmed intracellular accumulation and removal of arsenics. Arsenic accumulation in cells amounted to 5.0mg g(-1) of the cells dry biomass and thus reduced the arsenic concentration in the contaminated liquid medium by as much as 50%. These results indicate that B1-CDA has the potential for remediation of arsenic from the contaminated water. We believe the benefits of implementing this bacterium to efficiently reduce arsenic exposure will not only help to remove one aspect of human arsenic poisoning but will also benefit livestock and native animal species. Therefore, the outcome of this research will be highly significant for people in the affected area and also for human populations in other countries that have credible health concerns as a consequence of arsenic-contaminated water.

  • 5.
    Rahman, Aminur
    et al.
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nahar, Noor
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nawani, Neelu N.
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Tathawade, Pune, India.
    Jass, Jana
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Saha, Ananda K.
    Department of Zoology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Ghosh, Sibdas
    School of Arts and Science, Iona College, New Rochelle, New York, USA.
    Olsson, Björn
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Mandal, Abul
    Systems Biology Research Center, School of Bioscience, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium (VI) by a soil-borne bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA2015In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 1136-1147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromium and chromium containing compounds are discharged into the nature as waste from anthropogenic activities, such as industries, agriculture, forest farming, mining and metallurgy. Continued disposal of these compounds to the environment leads to development of various lethal diseases in both humans and animals. In this paper, we report a soil borne bacterium, B2-DHA that can be used as a vehicle to effectively remove chromium from the contaminated sources. B2-DHA is resistant to chromium with a MIC value of 1000 mu g mL(-1) potassium chromate. The bacterium has been identified as a Gram negative, Enterobacter cloacae based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene analysis. TOF-SIMS and ICP-MS analyses confirmed intracellular accumulation of chromium and thus its removal from the contaminated liquid medium. Chromium accumulation in cells was 320 mu g/g of cells dry biomass after 120-h exposure, and thus it reduced the chromium concentration in the liquid medium by as much as 81%. Environmental scanning electron micrograph revealed the effect of metals on cellular morphology of the isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that B2-DHA has the potential to reduce chromium significantly to safe levels from the contaminated environments and suggest the potential use of this bacterium in reducing human exposure to chromium, hence avoiding poisoning.

1 - 5 of 5
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