oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Beales, Darren
    et al.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin Univ, Perth WA, Australia.
    Kyaw-Myint, SuMon
    Safe Work Australia, Canberra Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
    Smith, Anne
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin Univ, Perth WA, Australia.
    O'Sullivan, Peter
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin Univ, Perth WA, Australia.
    Pransky, Glenn
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Boston MA, USA.
    Linton, Steven
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Job, Jenny
    Safe Work Australia, Canberra Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
    Straker, Leon
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin Univ, Perth WA, Australia.
    Work Productivity Loss in Young Workers Is Substantial and Is Associated With Spinal Pain and Mental Ill-health Conditions2017In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 237-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of spinal pain and mental ill-health conditions on work productivity in 22-year-old workers.

    Methods: A cross-sectional design using data from the Raine Study cohort (n = 867) including self-reported work productivity and self-report of health practitioner diagnosed medical conditions.

    Result: Mean (median, 25th-percentile, 75th-percentile) annualized cost of health-related absenteeism was $AUD1899 ($0, $0, $1738) per worker. Annualized cost of presenteeism was $AUD10,674 ($6573, $4003, $13,087) per worker. Spinal pain and mental ill-health conditions were associated with increased health-related absenteeism, but not presenteeism.

    Conclusion: Work productivity loss in young workers is a substantial problem needing priority attention. Addressing spinal pain and mental ill-health may improve productivity of this important sector of the workforce.

  • 2.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; WorkWell, Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, North-West University, Westonaria, South Africa.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Work-Home Interference and Burnout A Study Based on Swedish Twins2014In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 361-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study sets out to investigate the impact of work-home interference on burnout in women and men, while taking genetic and family environmental factors into account.

    Methods: A total of 4446 Swedish twins were included in the study. The effects of work-home conflict (WHC) and home-work conflict (HWC) on burnout between and within pairs were analyzed with co-twin control analyses.

    Results: Both WHC and HWC were significantly associated with burnout. Genetic factors may be involved in the association between HWC and burnout in women. Familial factors were not involved for WHC and burnout, neither for women nor for men.

    Conclusions: This study shows the importance to encounter WHC per se to prevent burnout. Because of genetic confounding in HWC and burnout in women, preventive efforts may also take into account individual characteristics.

  • 3. Hardell, Lennart
    et al.
    Andersson, Swen-Olof
    Carlberg, Michael
    Bohr, Louise
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lindström, Gunilla
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Björnfoth, Helen
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Ginman, Claes
    Adipose tissue concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and the risk of prostate cancer2006In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 700-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to study the concentrations of certain persistent organic pollutants with endocrine-disrupting properties in cases with prostate cancer and controls with benign prostate hyperplasia. METHODS: Adipose tissue was obtained from 58 cases and 20 controls. RESULTS: The median concentration among controls was used as cut-off in the statistical analysis. In the total material, a greater-than median concentration of PCB congener 153 yielded an odds ratio (OR) of 3.15 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.04-9.54 and one chlordane type, trans-chlordane, yielded OR 3.49 (95% CI = 1.08-11.2). In the group of case subjects with PSA levels greater than the median level of 16.5 ng/mL, PCB 153 was OR 30.3 (95% CI = 3.24-284), hexachlorobenzene OR = 9.84 (95% CI = 1.99-48.5), trans-chlordane OR = 11.0 (95% CI = 1.87-64.9), and the chlordane-type MC6 OR = 7.58 (95% CI = 1.65-34.9). The grouping of PCBs according to structural and biological activity was found to produce significantly increased risks for enzyme and phenobarbital-inducing PCBs and lower chlorinated PCBs in the case group with PSA levels greater than 16.5 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: These chemicals might be of etiologic significance but need to be further investigated. The biological relevance of the arbitrary cut-off point of PSA is unclear.

  • 4.
    Löfstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Jessica
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Graff, Pål
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mölleby, Göte
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Olin, Anna-Carin
    Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Kåre
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Westberg, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Respiratory and Ocular Symptoms Among Employees at Swedish Indoor Swimming Pools2016In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 58, no 12, p. 1190-1195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study investigated trichloramine exposure and prevalence of respiratory and ocular symptoms among Swedish indoor swimming pool workers.

    Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to pool workers and referents. Lung function and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) were measured before and after work. Exposure to trichloramine and trihalomethanes was measured over work shifts.

    Results: The mean personal trichloramine exposure was 36g/m(3). Significantly more exposed workers reported ocular and nasal symptoms. There were significant differences between groups in FeNO change following work, with exposed showing increased FeNO, which grew when analyses included only nonsmokers.

    Conclusions: The findings indicate that indoor swimming pool environments may have irritating effects on mucous membranes. FeNO data also indicate an inflammatory effect on central airways, but the clinical relevance is unclear. Low trichloramine levels found in this study were not associated with health effects.

  • 5.
    Marsh, Gary M.
    et al.
    Department of Biostatistics, Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Buchanich, Jeanine M.
    Department of Biostatistics, Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Zimmerman, Sarah
    Department of Biostatistics, Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Liu, Yimeng
    Department of Biostatistics, Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Balmert, Lauren C.
    Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, University of Northwestern St. Paul , Roseville MN, United States.
    Graves, Jessica
    Department of Biostatistics, Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Kennedy, Kathleen J.
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Illinois, Chicago IL, United States.
    Esmen, Nurtan A.
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Illinois, Chicago IL, United States.
    Moshammer, Hanns
    Department of Environmental Health, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Morfeld, Peter
    Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Prevention Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Erren, Thomas
    Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Prevention Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Groß, Juliane Valérie
    Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Prevention Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Yong, Mei
    Institute for Occupational Medicine and Risk Assessment, Evonik Industries AG, Essen, Germany.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westberg, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    McElvenny, Damien
    Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Cherrie, John W.
    Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Mortality Among Hardmetal Production Workers: Pooled Analysis of Cohort Data From an International Investigation2017In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 12, p. e342-e364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Based on a pooled analysis of data from an international study, evaluate total and cause-specific mortality among hardmetal production workers with emphasis on lung cancer.

    METHODS: Study members were 32,354 workers from three companies and 17 manufacturing sites in five countries. We computed standardized mortality ratios and evaluated exposure-response via relative risk regression analysis.

    RESULTS: Among long-term workers, we observed overall deficits or slight excesses in deaths for total mortality, all cancers, and lung cancer and found no evidence of any exposure-response relationships for lung cancer.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that duration, average intensity, or cumulative exposure to tungsten, cobalt, or nickel, at levels experienced by the workers examined, increases lung cancer mortality risks. We also found no evidence that work in these facilities increased mortality risks from any other causes of death.

  • 6.
    Morales-Suarez-Varela, Maria M.
    et al.
    Unit Publ Hlth & Environm Care, Dept Prevent Med, Univ Valencia, Valencia, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain; Ctr Publ Hlth Res CSISP, Valencia, Spain.
    Olsen, Jorn
    Res Unit Clin Epidemiol, Inst Clin Res, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Villeneuve, Sara
    CESP Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Institut National de la Santé et Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Villejuif, France; Univ Paris Sud, Villejuif, France.
    Johansen, Preben
    Dept Pathol, Aalborg Hosp, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Kaerlev, Linda
    Res Unit Clin Epidemiol, Inst Clin Res, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustin
    Unit Publ Hlth & Environm Care, Dept Prevent Med, Univ Valencia, Valencia, Spain; CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain.;Ctr Publ Hlth Res CSISP, Valencia, Spain.
    Wingren, Gun
    Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hardell, Lennart
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Oncol.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Div Biometry & Data Proc, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Bremen, Germany; Inst Med Informat, Univ Clin Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Stang, Andreas
    Inst Med Informat, Univ Clin Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Merletti, Franco
    Dept Med Sci, Univ Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Gorini, Giuseppe
    Canc Prevent & Res Inst, Florence, Italy.
    Jose Aurrekoetxea, Juan
    Dept Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Univ Basque Country, Madrid, Spain.
    Fevotte, Joelle
    Unité Mixte de Recherche Epidémiologique et de Surveillance Transport Travail Environnement (UMRESTTE), Univ Lyon 1, Lyon, France.
    Cyr, Diane
    INSERM, CESP Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France; Université de Versailles-St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France.
    Guenel, Pascal
    INSERM, CESP Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France; Univ Paris Sud, Villejuif, France.
    Occupational Exposure to Chlorinated and Petroleum Solvents and Mycosis Fungoides2013In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 924-931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF). Methods: A questionnaire on lifetime job history was administered to 100 patients diagnosed with MF and 2846 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated as the measure of the association between exposure to each specific solvent and MF. Results: In the total sample and in men, cases and controls did not differ in relation to exposure to any of the solvents studied. In women, an association with MF was seen for the highest level of estimated exposure to perchloroethylene (OR = 11.38; 95% confidence interval: 1.04 to 124.85) and for exposure less than the median to kerosene/fuel/gasoil (OR = 8.53; 95% confidence interval: 1.11 to 65.62). Conclusions: These results do not provide conclusive evidence that exposure to solvents may increase risk of MF because they were not found in men.

  • 7.
    Rehfisch, Pia
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Anderson, Martin
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berg, Peter
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lampa, Erik
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordling, Yvonne
    Occupational Health Service, Fagerstahälsan AB, Fagersta, Sweden.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westberg, Håkan
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lung function and respiratory symptoms in hard metal workers exposed to cobalt2012In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 409-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To follow-up lung function and airway symptoms in workers exposed to cobalt dust at a hard metal plant.

    Methods: A total of 582 employees underwent spirometry and completed a questionnaire. A historical exposure matrix was created, assigning figures for historical and recent work-related exposure.

    Results: At the time of employment, 5% reported symptoms from respiratory tract. At follow-up, 5% suffered from persistent coughing and 7% reported asthma; 20% were daily smokers. Among nonsmokers without asthma, an evident, statistically nonsignificant, dose-response effect was seen between increasing cobalt exposure and decline in FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second). In all exposure categories, the FEV1 in smokers declined 10 mL more per year than for nonsmokers.

    Conclusions: Even low levels of cobalt exposure seem to hamper lung function both in smokers and nonsmokers. This impact is considered low in relation to the effect of aging.

  • 8. Shaw, William S.
    et al.
    Pransky, Glenn
    Patterson, William
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Winters, Thomas
    Patient clusters in acute, work-related back pain based on patterns of disability risk factors2007In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify subgroups of patients with work-related back pain based on disability risk factors.

    METHODS: Patients with work-related back pain (N = 528) completed a 16-item questionnaire of potential disability risk factors before their initial medical evaluation. Outcomes of pain, functional limitation, and work disability were assessed 1 and 3 months later.

    RESULTS: A K-Means cluster analysis of 5 disability risk factors (pain, depressed mood, fear avoidant beliefs, work inflexibility, and poor expectations for recovery) resulted in 4 sub-groups: low risk (n = 182); emotional distress (n = 103); severe pain/fear avoidant (n = 102); and concerns about job accommodation (n = 141). Pain and disability outcomes at follow-up were superior in the low-risk group and poorest in the severe pain/fear avoidant group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with acute back pain can be discriminated into subgroups depending on whether disability is related to pain beliefs, emotional distress, or workplace concerns

  • 9.
    Shaw, William S.
    et al.
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; School of Medicine, Univ Massachusetts, Worcester MA, USA .
    Reme, Silje Endresen
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; Harvard Univ, School of Public Health, Boston MA, USA .
    Pransky, Glenn
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; School of Medicine, Univ Massachusetts, Worcester MA, USA .
    Woiszwillo, Mary Jane
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA.
    Steenstra, Ivan A.
    Institute for Work & Health, Toronto ON, Canada.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The Pain Recovery Inventory of Concerns and Expectations A Psychosocial Screening Instrument to Identify Intervention Needs Among Patients at Elevated Risk of Back Disability2013In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 885-894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To reduce a full psychosocial test battery to a brief screening questionnaire to triage return-to-work strategies among patients with low back pain (LBP). Methods: Workers (N = 496) with acute, work-related LBP completed multiple psychosocial measures at intake, then a 3-month follow-up of pain, function, and work status. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to reduce the number of items while maintaining scale reliability, preserving associations with outcomes, and maintaining separation between patient subgroups. Results: The pool of items was trimmed from 129 to 46 items, describing elements of emotional distress, pain beliefs, organizational support, and activity limitation. A confirmatory cluster analysis replicated previous findings of three risk subgroups: distressed, avoidant, and lacking employer support. Conclusions: The reduced measure is a reliable and valid screening measure that can be used to identify early intervention needs among working adults with LBP.

  • 10.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Medical Science, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Marsh, Gary
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Buchanich, Jeanine
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Zimmerman, Sarah
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Kennedy, Kathleen
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois, Chicago IL, United States.
    Esmen, Nurtan
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois, Chicago IL, United States.
    Westberg, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cancer Incidence Among Hardmetal Production Workers: The Swedish Cohort2017In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 12, p. e365-e373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cancer incidence was determined for 3713 workers from three plants from 1958 to 2011. The exposure measures were ever/never exposed, duration, cumulative, and mean cobalt concentrations.The incidence of all malignant neoplasms was increased at one plant, but standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 0.96 for all workers. Lung cancer incidence was increased for all workers, SIR 1.38 (1.01 to 1.85). The lung cancer incidence was associated with shorter employment time and showed no exposure-response. There was decreased incidence for skin cancer. Increased lip cancer incidence found at one of the production plants might be related to diagnostic intensity.Lung cancer incidence showed no correlation to cobalt exposure based on internal comparison. The increased SIR for all workers might be associated with other factors.

  • 11.
    Westberg, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Marsh, Gary
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Buchanich, Jeanine
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Zimmerman, Sarah
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Kennedy, Kathleen
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL, United States.
    Esmen, Nurtan
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL, United States.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Department of Medical Science, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mortality Among Hardmetal Production Workers: The Swedish Cohort2017In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 12, p. e263-e274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The mortality pattern was determined in a cohort of 16,999 white and blue-collar workers in the Swedish hardmetal industry, particularly for cobalt exposure and lung cancer.

    METHODS: The mortality follow-up analysis in the Swedish Mortality register covered the period from 1952 to 2012. The exposure measures were ever/never exposed, duration of exposure, cumulative, and mean cobalt concentrations.

    RESULTS: The mortality of all causes was significantly increased, highly associated with the short-term employed workers. A negative exposure-response was found for lung cancer and duration of exposure. An exposure-response was determined for cumulative and mean cobalt exposures analyzed by quartiles, but not for exposure classes. Internal comparison analysis using proportional hazard showed no exposure-response.

    CONCLUSIONS: The cohort lung cancer mortality showed no correlation to cobalt, nickel, or tungsten exposure.

  • 12.
    Westberg, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Marsh, Gary
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Kennedy, Kathleen
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL, United States.
    Buchanich, Jeanine
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Zimmerman, Sarah
    Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA, United States.
    Esmen, Nurtan
    Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL, United States.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Department of Medical Science, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mortality Among Hardmetal Production Workers: Swedish Measurement Data and Exposure Assessment2017In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 12, p. e327-e341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mortality pattern was determined in a cohort of 16,999 white and blue-collar workers in the Swedish hardmetal industry. Exposure assessment for cobalt is presented.

    METHODS: A historical database (1970 to 2012) of personal and area measurements of cobalt, tungsten, and nickel in the Swedish hardmetal industry was created. Log linear and exponential modeling of cobalt concentrations based on time period, job, and site was performed, and cumulative and mean exposures were calculated.

    RESULTS: Some 37% of the personal cobalt measurements exceeded 0.02 mg/m, mostly for powder production, pressing, and shaping. The log linear regression showed statistical differences (P < 0.05) between sites, time periods, and jobs. Some 1.6% of the cobalt cumulative exposures for blue-collar workers exceeded 0.4 mg/m years.

    CONCLUSION: Low levels of cumulative and mean exposures were determined.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf