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  • 1.
    Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Ludvigsson, Maria Landen
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Rehab Väst, County Council of Östergötland, Motala, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gun
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Factors associated with work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grade II-III: a cross-sectional analysis2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III.

    Design: Cross-sectional analysis.

    Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

    Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability.

    Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p < 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress.

    Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 2. Andersson, Åsa G.
    et al.
    Kamwendo, Kitty
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Seiger, Åke
    Appelros, Peter
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    How to identify potential fallers in a stroke unit: validity indexes of 4 test methods2006In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe general characteristics of patients with stroke who have a tendency to fall and to determine whether certain test instruments can identify fallers. METHODS: Patients treated in a stroke unit during a 12-month period were included. At inclusion assessments were made with Berg Balance Scale Berg Balance Scale, Stops Walking When Talking, Timed Up & Go (TUG) and diffTUG. At follow-up 6 or 12 months later, patients who had fallen were identified. RESULTS: During the time from discharge to follow-up on 159 patients, 68 patients fell and 91 did not. Fallers fell more often during their initial hospital stay, used sedatives more often and were more visually impaired, compared with non-fallers. The Berg Balance Scale, Stops Walking When Talking and TUG results differed between fallers and non-fallers. The combined results of Berg Balance Scale and Stops Walking When Talking increased the possibility of identifying fallers. CONCLUSION: Berg Balance Scale, Stops Walking When Talking and TUG can be used to evaluate which patients have a tendency to fall in order to carry out preventive measures. Berg Balance Scale can be used in all patients. Stops Walking When Talking can give additional information if the patient is able to walk. TUG is a possible choice, but fewer patients can perform it.

  • 3.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; CHILD, School of Health Science, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    International classification of functioning, disability and health categories explored for selfrated participation in swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 562-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore internal consistency and correlations between perceived ability, performance and perceived importance in a preliminary selection of self-reported items representing the activity/participation component of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    Design: Structured interview study. Subjects: Fifty-five Swedish adolescents and adults with a mild intellectual disability.

    Methods: Questions about perceived ability, performance and perceived importance were asked on the basis of a 3-grade Likert-scale regarding each of 68 items representing the 9 ICF domains of activity/participation.

    Results: Internal consistency for perceived ability (Cron-bach's alpha for all 68 items): 0.95 (values for each domain varied between 0.57 and 0.85), for performance: 0.86 (between 0.27 and 0.66), for perceived importance: 0.84 (between 0.27 and 0.68). Seventy-two percent of the items showed correlations >0.5 (mean =0.59) for performance vs perceived importance, 41% >0.5 (mean =0.47) for perceived ability vs performance and 12% >0.5 (mean =0.28) for perceived ability vs perceived importance.

    Conclusion: Measures of performance and perceived importance may have to be based primarily on their estimated clinical relevance for describing aspects of the ICF participation concept. With a clinimetric approach, parts of the studied items and domains may be used to investigate factors related to different patterns and levels of participation, and outcomes of rehabilitation.

  • 4.
    Forsberg, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Neurotec Department.
    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; National Centre for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain.
    Widén Holmqvist, Lotta
    Division of Physiotherapy, Neurotec Department; Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Use of health-care, patient satisfaction and burden of care in Guillain-Barré syndrome2006In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 230-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate, in an unselected sample of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome in Sweden, the utilization of healthcare resources, satisfaction with these resources, informal help and the burden of care on family caregivers during the first 2 years after onset.SUBJECTS: Forty-four patients were enrolled from 8 hospitals, and 42 of them were followed for 2 years.METHODS: Data on the utilization of hospital inpatient and outpatient care, primary care and community-based services were collected via computerized registry information, medical records and a specific protocol. Patient satisfaction and the burden on family caregivers were studied using questionnaires.RESULTS: Forty-one patients required inpatient hospitalization for a mean of 82 days. Patients with persistent dependency during activities of daily living had significantly longer hospital stays and more days of outpatient rehabilitation. The majority of patients were satisfied with their care, but dissatisfaction was found regarding information and finances. At 2 years after onset, 26% of patients still depended on informal help. The spouses expressed increased concern and responsibility for household and family.CONCLUSION: Patients with persistent disability due to Guillain-Barré syndrome were found to have long-term need for services from the healthcare system and informal help.

  • 5.
    Hammer, Ann
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Lindmark, Birgitta
    Uppsala universitet.
    Test-retest intra-rater reliability of grip force in patients with stroke2003In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Coefficients of repeatability and reproducibility can be guides in differentiating between real changes and measurement error. The aim was to evaluate test-retest intra-rater reliability of a clinical procedure measuring grip force with Grippit in stroke patients, to assess relationship between grip force of the hands and between sustained and peak grip force. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients were tested using the Grippit at two occasions one hour apart. Each occasion comprised three consecutive trials per hand. RESULTS: The paretic hand needs to score a 50 N change within and between occasions to exceed the measurement error in 95% of the observations, irrespective of calculation method. Expressed by CV(within) the measurement error was 10%. There was no learning or fatigue effect during measuring. There was a wide variation between subjects but the mean ratio between sides was 0.66. The mean ratio between sustained and peak grip force was 0.80-0.84. CONCLUSION: The measurement errors were acceptable and the instrument can be recommended for the use in stroke patients at a department of rehabilitation medicine.

  • 6.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M.
    et al.
    Limb Deficiency and Arm Prosthesis Centre, Orebro University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Limb Deficiency and Arm Prosthesis Centre, Orebro University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Intra- and inter-rater reliability of the assessment of capacity for myoelectric control2006In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 118-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the reliability of the Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control (ACMC) in children and adults with a myoelectric prosthetic hand.

    DESIGN: Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability estimated from reported assessments by 3 different raters.

    PATIENTS: A sample of convenience of 26 subjects (11 males, 15 females) with upper limb reduction deficiency or amputation and myoelectric prosthetic hands were video-taped during a regular clinical visit for ACMC. Participants' ages ranged from 2 to 40 years.

    METHODS: After instruction, 3 occupational therapists with no, 10 weeks' and 15 years' clinical experience of myoelectric prosthesis training and follow-up independently rated the 30 ACMC items for each patient. The ratings were repeated after 2-4 weeks. Inter- and intra-rater reliability in items was examined by using weighted kappa statistics and Rasch-measurement analyses.

    RESULTS: The mean intra-rater agreement in items was excellent (kappa 0.81) in the more experienced raters. Fit statistics showed too much variation in the least experienced rater, who also had only good (kappa 0.65) agreement in items. The stability of rater calibrations between first and second assessment showed that no rater varied beyond chance (>0.50 logit) in severity. The mean inter-rater agreement in items was fair; kappa 0.60, between the experienced raters and kappa 0.47 between raters with no and 10 weeks' experience.

    CONCLUSION: Overall, the agreement was higher in the more experienced raters, indicating that reliable measures of the ACMC require clinical experience from myoelectric prosthesis training.

  • 7.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fisher, Anne G.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Assessment of capacity for myoelectric control: a new Rasch-built measure of prosthetic hand control2005In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 166-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To report the results from a Rasch rating scale analysis of the Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control (ACMC) implemented to evaluate internal scale validity, person response validity, separation reliability, targeting and responsiveness of the measures over time.

    DESIGN: Longitudinal data (18 months) from a prospective study of development of capacity for myoelectric control in children and adults were used for the analysis.

    PATIENTS: A consecutive sample of 75 subjects (43 males, 32 females) with upper limb reduction deficiency or amputation and myoelectric prosthetic hands referred for occupational therapy from September 2000 to March 2002. Participants' ages ranged from 2 to 57 years.

    METHODS: Outcome measure was the ACMC. Occupational therapists completed 210 assessments at an arm prosthesis centre in Sweden. A two-faceted rating scale analysis of the data was performed.

    RESULTS: All 30 ACMC items and 96.2% of participants demonstrated goodness-of-fit to the rating scale model for the ACMC. Separation and SE values suggested adequate reliability of the item and person estimates.

    CONCLUSION: The items demonstrated internal scale validity and the participants demonstrated person response validity. The ACMC was well targeted and sensitive enough to detect expected change in ability.

  • 8.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Aarts, Pauline
    Hoare, Brian
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Test-retest and alternate forms reliability of the assisting hand assessment2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 886-891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) has earlier demonstrated excellent validity and rater reliability. This study aimed to evaluate test-retest reliability of the AHA and alternate forms reliability between Small kids vs School kids AHA and the 2 board games in School kids AHA.

    DESIGN: Test-retest and alternate forms reliability was evaluated by repeated testing with 2 weeks interval.

    SUBJECTS: Fifty-five children with unilateral cerebral palsy, age range 2 years and 3 months to 11 years and 2 months.

    METHODS: Intraclass correlation coefficients and smallest detectable difference were calculated. Common item and common person linking plots using Rasch analysis and Bland-Altman plots were created.

    RESULTS: Intraclass correlation coefficients for test-retest was 0.99. Alternate forms intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.99 between Small kids and School kids AHA and 0.98 between board games. Smallest detectable difference was 3.89 points (sum scores). Items in common item linking plots and persons in common person linking plots were within 95% confidence intervals, indicating equivalence across test forms.

    CONCLUSION: The AHA has excellent test-retest and alternate forms reliability. A change of 4 points or more between test occasions represents a significant change. Different forms of the AHA give equivalent results.

  • 9.
    Klang Ibragimova, Nina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pless, Mia
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Adolfsson, Margareta
    SIDR, Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden; Sch Educ & Commun, Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    SIDR, Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden; Sch Hlth Sci, Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Björck Åkesson, Eva
    Sch Educ & Commun, Jönköping Univ, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Using content analysis to link texts on assessment and intervention to the international classification of functioning, disability and health: version for children and youth (ICF-CY)2011In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 728-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how content analysis can be used together with linking rules to link texts on assessment and intervention to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – version for children and youth (ICF-CY).

    Methods: Individual habilitation plans containing texts on assessment and intervention for children with disabilities and their families were linked to the ICF-CY using content analysis. Texts were first divided into meaning units in order to extract meaningful concepts. Meaningful concepts that were difficult to link to ICF-CY codes were grouped, and coding schemes with critical attributes were developed. Meaningful concepts that could not be linked to the ICF-CY were assigned to the categories “not-definable” and “not-covered”, using coding schemes with mutually exclusive categories.

    Results: The size of the meaning units selected resulted in different numbers and contents of meaningful concepts. Coding schemes with critical attributes of ICF-CY codes facilitated the linking of meaningful concepts to the most appropriate ICF-CY codes. Coding schemes with mutually exclusive categories facilitated the classification of meaningful concepts that could or could not be linked to the ICF-CY.

    Conclusion: Content analysis techniques can be applied together with linking rules in order to link texts on assessment and intervention to the ICF-CY.

  • 10.
    Lindner, Helen Y. N.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Linacre, John M.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M. N.
    Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Assessment of capacity for myoelectric control: evaluation of construct and rating scale2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 467-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the construct and rating scale of the Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control, an assessment to evaluate ability in using a prosthetic hand.

    Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Upper limb prosthesis users with different prosthetic levels/sides and prosthetic experience were included (n=96).

    Methods: Subjects' assessments with the Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control were collected by 6 raters during their regular hospital visits. Rasch analysis was used, since it allowed an analysis of the data at the item and category levels. Dimension, item hierarchy and item fit statistics were used to examine the construct. Different Rasch parameters were used to examine rating scale structure and its use.

    Results: The consistency of item difficulties with clinical knowledge and the unidimensionality confirmed that the construct is valid. Two items functioned unexpectedly (misfit), but the misfit was idiosyncratic to the sample, not systematic to the items. The 4-point rating scale usefully differentiated the subjects on the basis of their abilities. The use of category 2 was somewhat redundant.

    Conclusion: The Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control is a valid assessment that evaluates ability in using a prosthetic hand. Revision of the category 2 definition would improve the functioning of the rating scale.

  • 11.
    Pettersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Faager, Gun
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Improved oxygenation during standing performance of deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure after cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 748-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Breathing exercises after cardiac surgery are often performed in a sitting position. It is unknown whether oxygenation would be better in the standing position. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxygenation and subjecfive breathing ability during sitting vs standing performance of deep breathing exercises on the second day after cardiac surgery.

    Methods: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n=189) were randomized to sitting (controls) or standing. Both groups performed 3 x 10 deep breaths with a positive expiratory pressure device. Peripheral oxygen saturation was measured before, directly after, and 15 min after the intervention. Subjective breathing ability, blood pressure, heart rate, and pain were assessed.

    Results: Oxygenation improved significantly in the standing group compared with controls directly after the breathing exercises (p <0.001) and after 15 min rest (p=0.027). The standing group reported better deep breathing ability compared with controls (p=0.004). A slightly increased heart rate was found in the standing group (p= 0.047).

    Conclusion: After cardiac surgery, breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure, performed in a standing position, significantly improved oxygenation and subjective breathing ability compared with sitting performance. Performance of breathing exercises in the standing position is feasible and could be a valuable treatment for patients with postoperative hypoxaemia.

  • 12.
    Svanberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Psychosomatic Medicine Clinic, Västerås County Council, Västerås, Sweden.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Brodda-Jansen, Gunilla
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute for Psychophysiological Behavioral Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Impact of emotional distress and pain-related fear on patients with chronic pain: Subgroup analysis of patients referred to multimodal rehabilitation2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 354-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Multimodal rehabilitation programmes (MMRP) for chronic pain could be improved by determining which patients do not benefit fully. General distress and pain-related fear may explain variations in the treatment effects of MMRP.

    Design: Cohort study with a cross-sectional, prospective part.

    Patients: Chronic musculoskeletal pain patients referred to 2 hospital-based pain rehabilitation clinics.

    Methods: The cross-sectional part of this study cluster analyses patients (n = 1,218) with regard to distress and pain-related fear at first consultation in clinical pain rehabilitation and describes differences in external variables between clusters. The prospective part follows the subsample of patients (n = 260) participating in MMRP and describes outcome post-treatment.

    Results: Four distinct subgroups were found: (i) those with low levels of distress and pain-related fear; (ii) those with high levels of pain-related fear; (iii) those with high levels of distress; and (iv) those with high levels of distress and pain-related fear. These subgroups showed differences in demographics, pain characteristics, quality of life, and acceptance, as well as the degree of MMRP participation and MMRP outcome.

    Conclusion: Among patients with chronic pain referred to MMRP there are subgroups with different profiles of distress and pain-related fear, which are relevant to understanding the adaptation to pain and MMRP outcome. This knowledge may help us to select patients and tailor treatment for better results.

  • 13.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Physiotherapy, Örebro Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Lindmark, Birgitta
    Department of Neuroscience, Section of Physiotherapy, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Almgren, Stig-Olof
    Department of Thoracic Surgery, Örebro Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Tenling, Arne
    Department of Thoracic Anaesthesia and Clinical Psychology, Section of Physiotherapy, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Chest physiotherapy after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a comparison of three different deep breathing techniques2001In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 79-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effectiveness of three deep breathing techniques was evaluated in 98 male patients after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in a randomized trial. The techniques examined were deep breathing with a blow bottle-device, an inspiratory resistance-positive expiratory pressure mask (IR-PEP) and performed with no mechanical device. Pulmonary function and roentgenological changes were evaluated. Four days post-operatively there were significantly decreased vital capacity, inspiratory capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, functional residual capacity, total lung capacity and single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in all three groups (p < 0.0001). No major differences between the treatment groups were found, but the impairment in pulmonary function tended to be less marked using the blow bottle technique. The Blow bottle group had significantly less reduction in total lung capacity (p = 0.01) compared to the Deep breathing group, while the IR-PEP group did not significantly differ from the other two groups.

  • 14.
    Widar, Marita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Lars
    Karlsson-Tivenius, Susanne
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Long-term pain conditions after a stroke2002In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to classify and describe the characteristics of different long-term pain conditions after a stroke by clinical examination and pain assessment using the Pain-O-Meter and a Pain questionnaire. Pain was classified as central post-stroke pain (n = 15), nociceptive pain (n = 18), and tension-type headache (n = 10). In 65%, pain onset was within 1-6 months and the pain intensity revealed individual differences. Many pain descriptors was common, some were discriminating as burning in central and cramping in nociceptive pain, and pressing and worrying in headache. More than half with central or nociceptive pain had continuous or almost continuous pain. Cold was the factor mostly increasing the pain in central, physical movements in nociceptive pain, and stress and anxiety in headache. More than one-third had no pain treatment and two-thirds of those with central pain had no or inadequate prescribed pain treatment. The clinical findings support the classification of pain and describe discriminating and common pain characteristics in pain conditions after a stroke.

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