oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 100
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Blaznik, Urška
    et al.
    National Institute of Public Health, Ljubljana, Slovenija.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Eržen, Ivan
    National Institute of Public Health, Ljubljana, Slovenija; Department of the Public Health, Medical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Hlastan Ribič, Cirila
    National Institute of Public Health, Ljubljana, Slovenija; Department of the Public Health, Medical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Consumption of fruits and vegetables and probabilistic assessment of the cumulative acute exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides of schoolchildren in Slovenia2016In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 557-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables is a part of recommendations for a healthy diet. The aim of the present study was to assess acute cumulative dietary exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides via fruit and vegetable consumption by the population of schoolchildren aged 11-12 years and the level of risk for their health.

    Design: Cumulative probabilistic risk assessment methodology with the index compound approach was applied.

    Setting: Slovenia, primary schools.

    Subjects: Schoolchildren (n 1145) from thirty-one primary schools in Slovenia. Children were part of the PRO GREENS study 2009/10 which assessed 11-year-olds' consumption of fruit and vegetables in ten European countries.

    Results: The cumulative acute exposure amounted to 8·3 (95 % CI 7·7, 10·6) % of the acute reference dose (ARfD) for acephate as index compound (100 µg/kg body weight per d) at the 99·9th percentile for daily intake and to 4·5 (95 % CI 3·5, 4·7) % of the ARfD at the 99·9th percentile for intakes during school time and at lunch. Apples, bananas, oranges and lettuce contributed most to the total acute pesticides intake.

    Conclusions: The estimations showed that acute dietary exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides is not a health concern for schoolchildren with the assessed dietary patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption.

  • 2.
    Cattaneo, Adriano
    et al.
    U. for Hlth. Serv. Res./Intl. Coop., Istituto per l'Infanzia, Trieste, Italy .
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Koletzko, Berthold
    Metabolic Diseases and Nutrition, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, University of Munich, Germany .
    Guzman, Luis Ruiz
    Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, Barcelona, Spain .
    Protection, promotion and support of breast-feeding in Europe: current situation2005In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 39-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the current situation regarding protection, promotion and support of breast-feeding in Europe, as a first step towards the development of a blueprint for action.

    DESIGN AND SETTING: A questionnaire was completed by 29 key informants and 128 other informants in the EU, including member states, accession and candidate countries.

    RESULTS: EU countries do not fully comply with the policies and recommendations of the Global Strategy on Infant and Young Child Feeding that they endorsed during the 55th World Health Assembly in 2002. Some countries do not even comply with the targets of the Innocenti Declaration (1990). Pre-service training on breast-feeding practice is inadequate and in-service training achieves only low to medium coverage. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative is well developed only in three countries; in 19 countries, less than 15% of births occur in baby-friendly hospitals. The International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes, endorsed in 1981 by all countries, is not fully applied and submitted to independent monitoring. The legislation for working mothers meets on average the International Labour Organization standards, but covers only women with full formal employment. Voluntary mother-to-mother support groups and trained peer counsellors are present in 27 and 13 countries, respectively. Breast-feeding rates span over a wide range; comparisons are difficult due to use of non-standard methods. The rate of exclusive breast-feeding at 6 months is low everywhere, even in countries with high initiation rates.

    CONCLUSIONS: EU countries need to revise their policies and practices to meet the principles inscribed in the Global Strategy on Infant and Young Child Feeding in order to better protect, promote and support breast-feeding.

  • 3.
    Dernini, S.
    et al.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Forum on Mediterranean Food Cultures, Rome, Italy; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.
    Berry, E. M.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Department of Human Nutrition and Metabolism, Braun School of Public Health, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Serra-Majem, L.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; University of Las Palmas of Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain; Inter-University International Centre of Mediterranean Food Cultures Studies (CIISCAM), Rome, Italy.
    La Vecchia, C.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.
    Capone, R.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM), Bari, Italy.
    Medina, F. X.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Universitat Oberta de Catalunya/Open University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Aranceta-Bartrina, J.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; University of Navarra, Navarra, Spain.
    Belahsen, R.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Chouaib Doukkali University, El Jadida, Morocco.
    Burlingame, B.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    Calabrese, G.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Corella, D.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion, Valencia, Spain.
    Donini, L. M.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Inter-University International Centre of Mediterranean Food Cultures Studies (CIISCAM), Rome, Italy; INRA, INSERM, NORT/Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France.
    Lairon, D.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Meybeck, A.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.
    Pekcan, A. G.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Department of Nutrition and Dietetic, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.
    Piscopo, S.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Inter-University International Centre of Mediterranean Food Cultures Studies (CIISCAM), Rome, Italy.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    International Foundation of Mediterranean Diet (IFMeD), London, United Kingdom; Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Med Diet 4.0: the Mediterranean diet with four sustainable benefits2017In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 1322-1330Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To characterize the multiple dimensions and benefits of the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet, in order to revitalize this intangible food heritage at the country level; and to develop a multidimensional framework - the Med Diet 4.0 - in which four sustainability benefits of the Mediterranean diet are presented in parallel: major health and nutrition benefits, low environmental impacts and richness in biodiversity, high sociocultural food values, and positive local economic returns.

    Design: A narrative review was applied at the country level to highlight the multiple sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet into a single multidimensional framework: the Med Diet 4.0.

    Setting/subjects: We included studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals that contained data on the characterization of sustainable diets and of the Mediterranean diet. The methodological framework approach was finalized through a series of meetings, workshops and conferences where the framework was presented, discussed and ultimately refined.

    Results: The Med Diet 4.0 provides a conceptual multidimensional framework to characterize the Mediterranean diet as a sustainable diet model, by applying principles of sustainability to the Mediterranean diet.

    Conclusions: By providing a broader understanding of the many sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet, the Med Diet 4.0 can contribute to the revitalization of the Mediterranean diet by improving its current perception not only as a healthy diet but also a sustainable lifestyle model, with country-specific and culturally appropriate variations. It also takes into account the identity and diversity of food cultures and systems, expressed within the notion of the Mediterranean diet, across the Mediterranean region and in other parts of the world. Further multidisciplinary studies are needed for the assessment of the sustainability of the Mediterranean diet to include these new dimensions.

  • 4. Erlich, Rita
    et al.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlqvist, Mark L
    Cooking as a healthy behaviour2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1139-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Haapala, Irja
    et al.
    Hodge, Allison
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Yngve, Agneta
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Improving the quality of meals eaten or prepared outside the home2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 191-192Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6. Haapala, Irja
    et al.
    Hodge, Allison
    Tseng, Marilyn
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Yngve, Agneta
    Novum, Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Nutritional environments affecting the future of our children2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 949-950Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Haapala, Irja
    et al.
    Tseng, Marilyn
    Hodge, Allison
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Nutritional well-being among older people2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 11, p. 1891-1892Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hamdan, May
    et al.
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), University of Granada, Granada, Spain; An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine.
    Monteagudo, Celia
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Lorenzo-Tovar, Maria-Luisa
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Tur, José-Antonio
    Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, CIBERobn, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
    Olea-Serrano, Fatima
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Department of Food Technology, Nutrition and Food Science, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
    Development and validation of a nutritional questionnaire for the Palestine population2014In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 2512-2518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Dietary habits vary widely among regions and cultural groups, and FFQ need to be designed for specific populations. The objectives of the present study were to develop and test the repeatability and relative validity of a medium-length semi-quantitative FFQ for measuring the energy and macronutrient intakes of a specific population and to contribute a methodological framework for this procedure.

    Setting: Palestinian families in the Hebron area.

    Design: After a preliminary survey of a subgroup of homemakers using 3 d diet recall, stepwise multiple regression analysis was used for selected nutrients to choose foods for inclusion in the FFQ.

    Subjects: The FFQ was administered to a study population of 169 women representing the same number of families.

    Results: The Wilcoxon test and Bland-Altman plots were used to compare the FFQ results with the mean 3 d diet recall results. A high level of concordance was found, validating the FFQ. In this population, the mean consumption of SFA was above recommendations and the intakes of vitamin D, folic acid, Ca, Fe and K were deficient.

    Conclusions: The availability of diet assessment instruments designed for specific populations and cultures is of immense value to researchers and policy makers. The study describes a simple and effective method to develop and validate an FFQ for a given population of interest.

  • 9. Hodge, Allison
    et al.
    Haapala, Irja
    Yngve, Agneta
    Novum, Dept Bioscience & Nutrition, Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    McNeill, Geraldine
    Tseng, Marilyn
    A refresher in research publication ethics2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 377-378Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olsson, Lovisa A.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The International Physical Activity Questionnaire modified for the elderly: aspects of validity and feasibility2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 1847-1854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To modify the self-administered, short version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) for adults to be used in the elderly (aged 65 years and above), and to validate this modified IPAQ for the elderly (IPAQ-E).

    DESIGN: A direct validity study using accelerometer-measured physical activity (PA) as the criterion measure, and an indirect criterion validity study using high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as a biological marker of activity.

    SETTING: Organisations for retired persons in Sweden.

    SUBJECTS: The direct validity study consisted of fifty-four participants and the indirect criterion validity study consisted of 359 participants. All participants were retired persons (66-91 years) living independently.

    RESULTS: All self-reported activity domains (sitting, walking, moderate and vigorous) were positively correlated with the corresponding variable objectively assessed by an accelerometer (rho = 0.277-0.471), but a systematic error was observed. The specificity of IPAQ-E to identify low-active participants was 85 %, and the sensitivity to identify the more active participants was 81 %. A main effect of IPAQ-E category (Low, Moderate or High) was observed for hs-CRP (P = 0.041).

    CONCLUSIONS: We found this modified version of IPAQ, the IPAQ-E, to be well accepted by our sample of socially active elderly. It provided acceptable estimates of PA, well in line with other questionnaires, even though it had a systematic error. The IPAQ-E was able to identify an expected response of a biomarker (hs-CRP) to PA. We recommend the use of the IPAQ-E to classify participants aged 65 years and above into PA categories, to rank individuals or to identify individuals meeting certain PA criteria.

  • 11. Jonsdottir, Svandis
    et al.
    Hughes, Roger
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Yngve, Agneta
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Consensus on the competencies required for public health nutrition workforce development in Europe: the JobNut project2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1439-1449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess and develop consensus among a European panel of public health nutrition stakeholders regarding the competencies required for effective public health nutrition practice and the level of proficiency required in different practice contexts. Design: A modified Delphi study involving three rounds of questionnaires. Setting: European Union. Subjects: Public health nutrition workforce development stakeholders, including academics, practitioners and employers, from twenty European countries. Results: A total of fifty-two expert panellists (84% of an initial panel of sixty-two Delphi participants) completed all three rounds of the Delphi study. The panellists rated the importance of fifty-seven competency units possibly required of a public health nutritionist to effectively practice (Essential competencies). Twenty-nine of the fifty-seven competency units (51%) met the consensus criteria (>= 66.7% agreement) at the second round of the Delphi survey, with the highest agreement for competencies clustered within the Nutrition science, Professional, Analytical and Public health services competency domains. Ratings of the level of competencies required for different levels in the workforce indicated that for a public health nutrition specialist, advanced-level competency was required across almost all the twenty-nine competencies rated as essential. There were limited differences in rating responses between academics and employer panellists throughout the Delphi study. Conclusions: Competencies identified as essential can be used to review current public health nutrition practices and provide the basis for curriculum design and re-development, continuing education and workforce quality assurance systems in Europe. These are all important tools for systematic and strategic workforce development.

  • 12.
    Jonsdottir, Svandis
    et al.
    Unit for Nutrition Research, The National University Hospital of Iceland, University of Iceland & Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, The National University Hospital of Iceland, University of Iceland & Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Kugelberg, Susanna
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Nutrition and Management, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Nutrition and Management, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Kennedy, Nicholas P.
    Unit of Nutrition and Dietetic Studies, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin & Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St. James’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
    Hughes, Roger
    School of Health Sciences, Bond University, Robina Qld, Australia.
    Core functions for the public health nutrition workforce in Europe: a consensus study2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1999-2004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess and develop a consensus among a European panel of public health nutrition workforce stakeholders (academics and employers) regarding core functions required for effective public health nutrition practice.

    Design: A modified Delphi study involving data from two rounds of questionnaires administered among a panel of public health nutrition workforce stakeholders.

    Setting: Europe.

    Subjects: A panel of fifty-three public health nutrition development stakeholders, including thirty-three academics and twenty employers, sampled from eighteen European countries.

    Results: Panellists rated 50 % (19/38) of the initially listed functions as core (i.e. without which public health capacity is limited), using a majority cut-off (>50 %). Out of the nineteen core functions seven were categorised under the heading Intervention management, emphasising high agreement on the importance of managing interventions in public health nutrition work. Only one of the identified core public health nutrition functions was rated differently between academics and employers, suggesting consistent identification of core functions between stakeholder groups.

    Conclusions: This consensus on core functions of the public health nutrition workforce in Europe can be used to promote a consistent understanding of the role and value of public health nutritionists as a discrete disciplinary sub-specialty of the public health workforce. The convergence of opinions of academics and employers, as well as comparison with previous international studies, indicates that there is a set of core public health nutrition functions transferable between countries that can be used as a benchmark to guide further development of the public health nutrition workforce in Europe.

  • 13.
    Kugelberg, Susanna
    et al.
    Unit for Public Health Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Health, Nutrition and Management, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Jonsdottir, Svandis
    Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Faxelid, Elisabeth
    Division of Global Health/IHCAR, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Kristina
    Department of Political Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fox, Ann
    Department of Nutritional Sciences and The Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto ON, Canada.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Public Health Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Health, Nutrition and Management, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Public health nutrition workforce development in seven European countries: constraining and enabling factors2012In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1989-1998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Little is known about current public health nutrition workforce development in Europe. The present study aimed to understand constraining and enabling factors to workforce development in seven European countries.

    Design: A qualitative study comprised of semi-structured face-to-face interviews was conducted and content analysis was used to analyse the transcribed interview data.

    Setting: The study was carried out in Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the UK.

    Subjects: Sixty key informants participated in the study.

    Results: There are constraining and enabling factors for public health nutrition workforce development. The main constraining factors relate to the lack of a supportive policy environment, fragmented organizational structures and a workforce that is not cohesive enough to implement public health nutrition strategic initiatives. Enabling factors were identified as the presence of skilled and dedicated individuals who assume roles as leaders and change agents.

    Conclusions: There is a need to strengthen coordination between policy and implementation of programmes which may operate across the national to local spectrum. Public health organizations are advised to further define aims and objectives relevant to public health nutrition. Leaders and agents of change will play important roles in fostering intersectorial partnerships, advocating for policy change, establishing professional competencies and developing education and training programmes.

  • 14.
    Lehto, Elviira
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ray, Carola
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Te Velde, Saskia
    EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Petrova, Stefka
    National Center of Public Health and Analyses, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Duleva, Vesselka
    National Center of Public Health and Analyses, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Krawinkel, Michael
    Institute of Nutrition Sciences, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Behrendt, Isabel
    Institute of Nutrition Sciences, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Giessen, Germany; Institute of Nutrition Physiology and Human Nutrition, University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Papadaki, Angeliki
    Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece; Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Kristjansdottir, Åsa
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital and Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital and Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Department for Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lien, Nanna
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Lynch, Christel
    Department for Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department for Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Porto University, Porto, Portugal.
    Ribic, Cirila Hlastan
    National Institute of Public Health, Chronic Diseases Prevention Centre, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Simčic, Irena
    National Education Institute of the Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Roos, Eva
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mediation of parental educational level on fruit and vegetable intake among schoolchildren in ten European countries2015In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine which factors act as mediators between parental educational level and children's fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake in ten European countries.

    Design: Cross-sectional data were collected in ten European countries participating in the PRO GREENS project (2009). Schoolchildren completed a validated FFQ about their daily F&V intake and filled in a questionnaire about availability of F&V at home, parental facilitation of F&V intake, knowledge of recommendations about F&V intake, self-efficacy to eat F&V and liking for F&V. Parental educational level was determined from a questionnaire given to parents. The associations were examined with multilevel mediation analyses.

    Setting: Schools in Bulgaria, Finland, Germany, Greece, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia and Sweden.

    Subjects: Eleven-year-old children (n 8159, response rate 72%) and their parents.

    Results: In five of the ten countries, children with higher educated parents were more likely to report eating fruits daily. This association was mainly mediated by knowledge but self-efficacy, liking, availability and facilitation also acted as mediators in some countries. Parents' education was positively associated with their children's daily vegetable intake in seven countries, with knowledge and availability being the strongest mediators and self-efficacy and liking acting as mediators to some degree.

    Conclusions: Parental educational level correlated positively with children's daily F&V intake in most countries and the pattern of mediation varied among the participating countries. Future intervention studies that endeavour to decrease the educational-level differences in F&V intake should take into account country-specific features in the relevant determinants of F&V intake.

  • 15.
    Lynch, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Kristjansdottir, Asa Gudrun
    Unit for Nutrition Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Te Velde, Saskia J
    EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Lien, Nanna
    Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway .
    Roos, Eva
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Krawinkel, Michael
    Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural Nutrition, Environmental Sciences and Home Economics, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany .
    de Almeida, Maria Daniel Vaz
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal .
    Papadaki, Angeliki
    Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece; Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Ribic, Cirila Hlastan
    National Institute of Public Health, Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Petrova, Stefka
    National Center for Public Health Protection, Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Halldorsson, Thorhallur I
    Unit for Nutrition Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Fruit and vegetable consumption in a sample of 11-year-old children in ten European countries: the PRO GREENS cross-sectional survey2014In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 2436-2444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe fruit and vegetable intake of 11-year-old children in ten European countries and compare it with current dietary guidelines.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. Intake was assessed using a previously validated questionnaire containing a pre-coded 24 h recall and an FFQ which were completed in the classroom. Portion sizes were calculated using a standardized protocol.

    SETTING: Surveys were performed in schools regionally selected in eight countries and nationally representative in two countries.

    SUBJECTS: A total of 8158 children from 236 schools across Europe participating in the PRO GREENS project.

    RESULTS: The total mean consumption of fruit and vegetables was between 220 and 345 g/d in the ten participating countries. Mean intakes did not reach the WHO population goal of ≥400 g/d in any of the participating countries. Girls had a significantly higher intake of total fruit and vegetables than boys in five of the countries (Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Bulgaria and Slovenia). Mean total fruit intake ranged between 114 and 240 g/d and vegetable intake between 73 and 141 g/d. When using the level ≥400 g/d as a cut-off, only 23·5 % (13·8-37·0 %) of the studied children, depending on country and gender, met the WHO recommendation (fruit juice excluded).

    CONCLUSIONS: Fruit and vegetable consumption was below recommended levels among the schoolchildren in all countries and vegetable intake was lower than fruit intake. The survey shows that there is a need for promotional activities to improve fruit and vegetable consumption in this age group.

  • 16.
    Margetts, Barrie
    et al.
    Public Health Nutrition, Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Warm, Daniel
    Public Health Nutrition, Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Developing an evidence-based approach to Public Health Nutrition: translating evidence into policy2001In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 4, no 6A, p. 1393-1397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of an evidence-based approach to the development, implementation and evaluation of policies aimed at improving nutrition-related health in the population. Public Health Nutrition was established to realise a population-level approach to the prevention of the major nutrition-related health problems world-wide. The scope is broad and integrates activity from local, national, regional and international levels. The aim is to inform and develop coherent and effective policies that address the key rate-limiting steps critical to improving nutrition-related public health. This paper sets out the rationale for an evidence-based approach to Public Health Nutrition developed under the umbrella of the European Network for Public Health Nutrition.

  • 17.
    Monteagudo, Celia
    et al.
    Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), Department Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Palacín-Arce, Alba
    Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), Department Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Bibiloni, Maria del Mar
    Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
    Pons, Antoni
    Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
    Tur, Josep A.
    Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
    Olea-Serrano, Fatima
    Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), Department Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel
    Research Group Nutrition, Diet and Risk Assessment (AGR-255), Department Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Proposal for a Breakfast Quality Index (BQI) for children and adolescents2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 639-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To propose and apply an instrument to assess the breakfast quality of children and adolescents in the Mediterranean area.

    DESIGN: Randomized, cross-sectional survey of breakfast consumption using a validated semi-quantitative FFQ administered at school by trained dietitians between Tuesday and Friday. A Breakfast Quality Index (BQI) score was developed, assigning a positive value to the consumption of cereals, fruit, vegetables, dairy products, MUFA, Ca and compliance with energy recommendations, and to the absence of SFA and trans-rich fats. Data were analysed by Student's t test and ANOVA.

    SETTING: Schools in Granada and Balearic Islands (Spain).

    SUBJECTS: All schoolchildren (n 4332) aged 8-17 years at randomly selected and representative schools between 2006 and 2008, stratified by age and sex.

    RESULTS: Breakfast was not consumed by 6·5 % of participants. BQI score was highest for children aged 7-9 years and decreased with age (P = 0·001). Females scored higher in all age groups. The lowest score was in males aged 14-17 years and the highest in females aged 7-9 years (P = 0·006).

    CONCLUSIONS: The proposed BQI appears useful to estimate the breakfast quality of schoolchildren and to form a basis for nutrition education.

  • 18.
    Naska, Androniki
    et al.
    Department of Hygiene Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Bountziouka, Vasiliki
    Department of Hygiene Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Department of Hygiene Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Soft drinks: time trends and correlates in twenty-four European countries. A cross-national study using the DAFNE (Data Food Networking) databank2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1346-1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate time trends in the availability of soft drinks, to identify food choices associated with their consumption and to assess the relationship between socio-economic status and daily soft drink availability in a wide range of European countries.

    Design: Data on food and beverage availability collected through the national household budget surveys and harmonized in the DAFNE (Data Food Networking) project were used. Averages and variability of soft drink availability were estimated and tests for time trends were performed. The daily availability of food groups which appear to be correlated with that of soft drinks was further estimated. Multivariate logistic and linear regression models were applied to evaluate the association between socio-economic status and the acquisition of soft drinks.

    Setting: Twenty-four European countries.

    Subjects: Nationally representative samples of households.

    Results: The availability of soft drinks is steadily and significantly increasing. Households in West and North Europe reported higher daily availability of soft drinks in comparison to other European regions. Soft drinks were also found to be correlated with lower availability of plant foods and milk and higher availability of meat and sugar products. Lower socio-economic status was associated with more frequent and higher availability of soft drinks in the household.

    Conclusions: Data collected in national samples of twenty-four European countries showed disparities in soft drink availability among socio-economic strata and European regions. The correlation of soft drinks with unfavourable dietary choices has public health implications, particularly among children and adolescents.

  • 19.
    Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen
    et al.
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao Department of Public Health, Bilbao, Spain.
    Klepp, Knut-Inge
    nstitute for Nutrition Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Stockley, Lynn
    Food & Nutrition Consultant, Timberland, Mill Hill, Brockweir, nr Chepstow, Gloucestershire, UK.
    Aranceta, Javier
    Community Nutrition Unit, Bilbao Department of Public Health, Bilbao, Spain.
    The school setting: an opportunity for the implementation of dietary guidelines2001In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 4, no 2B, p. 717-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrition, physical activity and health related promotion programmes in schools have developed into a mature field of research over the past decades. A number of success factors have been identified and evidence-based interventions have been performed. However, the school setting as an arena for evidence-based health promotion programmes, is still not used to its full potential. Schools provide an excellent arena for reaching large segments of the population, such as young people, school staff, families and the surrounding community.

    There is a need for an overview regarding the current status of nutrition, physical activity, related health as well as support structures in the EU member states. Based upon such an analysis, a consensus report should be written, pointing out the major problems at hand. Self-assessment tools for national as well as for school level should be produced, in order to guide changes, but also to include an element of continuous assessment of change, for evaluation purposes.

  • 20.
    Ray, Carola
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Roos, Eva
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brug, Johannes
    EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research and Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Behrendt, Isabel
    Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
    Ehrenblad, Bettina
    Unit for Public Health Nutrition, Department for Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Department of Health, Nutrition and Management, Oslo and Akershus University College, Lilleström, Norway.
    te Velde, Saskia J.
    EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research and Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Role of free school lunch in the associations between family-environmental factors and children's fruit and vegetable intake in four European countries2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1109-1117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether an association exists between different clusters of fruit- and vegetable-specific family-environmental factors and children's daily fruit and vegetable intake, and whether these associations differ between countries with different school lunch policies.

    Design: Cross-sectional data from four European countries participating in the Pro Greens project in 2009. These countries have different school food policies: two serve free school lunches and two do not. Self-administered data were used. Food frequency questions served to assess fruit and vegetable intakes. The study assessed sixteen children-perceived family-environmental factors, which were clustered based on principal component analysis into five sum variables: fruit and vegetable encouragement; vegetable modelling, family routine and demand; fruit modelling; fruit and vegetable snacking practices; and fruit and vegetable allowing.

    Setting: Schools in Finland, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands.

    Subjects: Schoolchildren aged 11 years (n 3317).

    Results: Multilevel logistic regression analyses revealed positive associations between nearly all clustered family-environmental factors and daily fruit and vegetable intake. The study tested a moderation effect between family-environmental factors and school lunch policy. In five out of twenty models significant interactions occurred. In the stratified analyses, most of the associations between family-environmental factors and raw and cooked vegetable intake were stronger in Germany and the Netherlands, neither of which provided free school lunches.

    Conclusions: Children reporting more fruit- and vegetable-promoting family-environmental factors had a more frequent intake of fruits and vegetables; the associations were stronger for vegetable intakes in countries providing no free school lunches, suggesting that parental involvement is crucial when schools offer no vegetables

  • 21.
    Roos, Eva
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Pajunen, Tuuli
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland .
    Ray, Carola
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Lynch, Christel
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gudrun Kristiansdottir, Åsa
    Unit for Nutrition Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Halldorsson, Thorhallur
    Unit for Nutrition Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    te Velde, Saskia
    EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Krawinkel, Michael
    Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural Nutrition, Environmental Sciences and Home Economics, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany .
    Behrendt, Isabel
    Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural Nutrition, Environmental Sciences and Home Economics, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, Germany .
    Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal .
    Franchini, Bela
    Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal .
    Papadaki, Angeliki
    Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece; Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom .
    Moschandreas, Johanna
    Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Unit for Nutrition Research, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Ribic, Cirila Hlastan
    National Education Institute of the Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Petrova, Stefk
    National Center for Public Health Protection, Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Duleva, Vesselka
    National Center for Public Health Protection, Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Simcic, Irena
    National Education Institute of the Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Does eating family meals and having the television on during dinner correlate with overweight?: a sub-study of the PRO GREENS project, looking at children from nine European countries2014In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 2528-2536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Family meals have been negatively associated with overweight in children, while television (TV) viewing during meals has been associated with a poorer diet. The aim of the present study was to assess the association of eating family breakfast and dinner, and having a TV on during dinner, with overweight in nine European countries and whether these associations differed between Northern and Southern & Eastern Europe.

    Design: Cross-sectional data. Schoolchildren reported family meals and TV viewing. BMI was based on parental reports on height and weight of their children. Cut-off points for overweight by the International Obesity Task Force were used. Logistic regressions were performed adjusted by age, gender and parental education.

    Setting: Schools in Northern European (Sweden, the Netherlands, Iceland, Ger- many and Finland) and Southern & Eastern European (Portugal, Greece, Bulgaria and Slovenia) countries, participating in the PRO GREENS project.

    Subjects: Children aged 10–12 years in (n 6316).

    Results: In the sample, 21 % of the children were overweight, from 35 % in Greece to 10 % in the Netherlands. Only a few associations were found between family meals and TV viewing during dinner with overweight in the nine countries. Northern European children, compared with other regions, were significantly more likely to be overweight if they had fewer family breakfasts and more often viewed TV during dinner.

    Conclusions: The associations between family meals and TV viewing during dinner with overweight were few and showed significance only in Northern Europe. Differences in foods consumed during family meals and in health-related lifestyles between Northern and Southern & Eastern Europe may explain these discrepancies.

  • 22.
    Scander, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Monteagudo, Celia
    Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Bente B.
    School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Meal Science, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden; Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo Metropolian University, Oslo, Norway.
    Tellström, Richard
    School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Meal Science, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden; Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts and Meal Science, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden; Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Beverage consumption patterns and energy contribution from beverages per meal type: results from a national dietary survey in Sweden2018In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 21, no 18, p. 3318-3327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Many studies of food intake have been performed and published in Sweden, but to our knowledge no studies have extensively explored the beverage consumption of the Swedish adult population. The present study aimed to describe the beverage consumption and the contribution of beverage energy (including alcohol energy) to total energy intake according to gender, region of living, meal type and day for a Swedish adult population.

    Design: National dietary survey Riksmaten (2010–2011), collected by the Swedish National Food Agency.

    Setting: Sweden.

    Subjects: A total of 1682 participants (57 % women) reported dietary intake data during four consecutive days, specified by portion size, meal, time point, day of the week and venue. Meals were categorized as breakfast, lunch, dinner and ‘other’.

    Result: The beverage reported to be consumed the most was water (ml/d), followed by coffee. Men had a higher consumption of juice, soft drinks, beer, spirits and low-alcohol beer, while the consumption of tea and water was higher for women. For both genders, milk contributed the most to beverage energy intake. Energy percentage from beverages was higher at lunch and dinner during weekends for both genders. Participants from the biggest cities in Sweden had a higher consumption of wine for both genders and tea for men than participants from other regions.

    Conclusions: A considerable part of total energy intake was contributed by beverages, especially for men. Beverages can contribute to a more enjoyable diet, but at the same time provide energy, sugar and alcohol in amounts that do not promote optimal health.

  • 23.
    Sjöström, Michael
    et al.
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Warm, Daniel
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge; nstitute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge; Department of Physical Education and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Diet and physical activity - interactions for health: public health nutrition in the European perspective1999In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 2, no 3A, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the majority of European adults, who neither smoke nor drink excessively, the most significant controllable risk factors affecting their long-term health are what they eat, and how physically active they are.

    Scientists are supposed to clarify to policy makers and health professionals the usefulness of their health messages. However, to be able to do that, a more detailed understanding is needed of the basic mechanisms behind the effects on health of diet and physical activity and, especially, the two in combination. Further, better methods for assessment of nutrition and physical activity in the population have to be developed, and more and better baseline data have to be collected. Increased and more efficient interventions are then needed. People trained and competent in the new discipline of Public Health Nutrition are required.

    Through the stimulating support that the European Commission, as well as other national and international partners, are presently giving to the development of Public Health Nutrition across Europe, we can hope for an increased mobility, networking and understanding between European nutrition and physical activity professionals. This will most likely result in greater and better policy making, strategy development, implementation and evaluation. We now have a great possibility to develop the integrated field of preventive nutrition and health enhancing physical activity.

  • 24.
    van Vught, Anneke J. A. H.
    et al.
    Dept Human Biol, Univ Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; TI Food & Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Heitmann, Berit L.
    Res Unit Dietary Studies, Inst Prevent Med, Univ Copenhagen Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G.
    Dept Human Biol, Univ Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; TI Food & Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Veldhorst, Margriet A. B.
    Dept Human Biol, Univ Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; TI Food & Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Andersen, Lars Bo
    Inst Sport Sci & Clin Biomech, Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Hasselstrom, Henriette
    Inst Sport Sci & Clin Biomech, Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Brummer, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.
    Dept Human Biol, Univ Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; TI Food & Nutr, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Association between intake of dietary protein and 3-year-change in body growth among normal and overweight 6-year-old boys and girls (CoSCIS)2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 647-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Growth hormone (GH) affects linear growth and body composition, by increasing the secretion of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), muscle protein synthesis and lipolysis. The intake of protein (PROT) as well as the specific amino acids arginine (ARG) and lysine (LYS) stimulates GH/IGF-I secretion. The present paper aimed to investigate associations between PROT intake as well as intake of the specific amino acids ARG and LYS, and subsequent 3-year-change in linear growth and body composition among 6-year-old children.

    Design: Children's data were collected from Copenhagen (Denmark), during 2001-2002, and again 3 years later. Boys and girls were separated into normal weight and overweight, based on BMI quintiles. Fat-free mass index (FFMI) and fat mass index (FMI) were calculated. Associations between change (Delta) in height, FMI and FFMI, respectively, and habitual PROT intake as well as ARG and LYS were analysed by multiple linear regressions, adjusted for baseline height, FMI or FFMI and energy intake, age, physical activity and socio-economic status.

    Setting: Eighteen schools in two suburban communities in the Copenhagen (Denmark) area participated in the study. SUBJECTS: In all, 223 children's data were collected for the present study.

    Results: High ARG intake was associated with linear growth (beta = 1.09 (se 0.54), P = 0.05) among girls. Furthermore, in girls, DeltaFMI had a stronger inverse association with high ARG intake, if it was combined with high LYS intake, instead of low LYS intake (P = 0.03). No associations were found in boys.

    Conclusion: In prepubertal girls, linear growth may be influenced by habitual ARG intake and body fat gain may be relatively prevented over time by the intake of the amino acids ARG and LYS.

  • 25.
    Villa, Inga
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia; Estonian Centre of Behavioural & Health Sciences, Estonia.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grjibovski, Andrej
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Liiv, Krystiine
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Harro, Maarike
    Estonian Centre of Behavioural & Health Sciences, Estonia; National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Dietary intake among under-, normal- and overweight 9- and 15-year-old Estonian and Swedish schoolchildren.2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 311-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the differences in macronutrient and food group contribution to total food and energy intakes between Estonian and Swedish under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren, and to estimate the association between diet and body mass index (BMI).

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison between Estonian and Swedish children and adolescents of different BMI groups.

    SETTING: Twenty-five schools from one region in Estonia and 42 in two regions of central Sweden.

    SUBJECTS: In total 2308 participants (1176 from Estonia and 1132 from Sweden), including 1141 children with a mean age of 9.6 +/- 0.5 years and 1167 adolescents with a mean age of 15.5 +/- 0.6 years.

    RESULTS: Overweight was more prevalent among younger girls in Sweden (17.0 vs. 8.9%) and underweight among girls of both age groups in Estonia (7.9 vs. 3.5% in younger and 10.5 vs. 5.1% in older age group of girls). Compared with that of normal- and underweight peers, the diet of overweight Estonian children contained more energy as fat (36.8 vs. 31.7%) but less as carbohydrates, and they consumed more milk and meat products. Absolute BMI of Estonian participants was associated positively with energy consumption from eggs and negatively with energy consumption from sweets and sugar. Swedish overweight adolescents tended to consume more energy from protein and milk products. Risk of being overweight was positively associated with total energy intake and energy from fish or meat products. In both countries the association of overweight and biological factors (pubertal maturation, parental BMI) was stronger than with diet.

    CONCLUSION: The finding that differences in dietary intake between under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren are country-specific suggests that local dietary habits should be considered in intervention projects addressing overweight.

  • 26.
    Wijnhoven, Trudy Ma
    et al.
    Division of Noncommunicable Diseases and Promoting Health through the Life-Course, WHO Regional Office for Europe, UN City, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    van Raaij, Joop Ma
    Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands; Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Sjöberg, Agneta
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kunešová, Marie
    Obesity Management Centre, Institute of Endocrinology, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Duleva, Vesselka
    Department of Food and Nutrition, National Center of Public Health and Analyses, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Petrauskiene, Ausra
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Rito, Ana I
    National Health Institute Doutor Ricardo Jorge, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Breda, João
    Division of Noncommunicable Diseases and Promoting Health through the Life-Course, WHO Regional Office for Europe, UN City, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative: health-risk behaviours on nutrition and physical activity in 6-9-year-old schoolchildren2015In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 18, no 17, p. 3108-3124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess to what extent eight behavioural health risks related to breakfast and food consumption and five behavioural health risks related to physical activity, screen time and sleep duration are present among schoolchildren, and to examine whether health-risk behaviours are associated with obesity.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional design as part of the WHO European Childhood Obesity Surveillance Initiative (school year 2007/2008). Children's behavioural data were reported by their parents and children's weight and height measured by trained fieldworkers. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed.

    SETTING: Primary schools in Bulgaria, Lithuania, Portugal and Sweden; paediatric clinics in the Czech Republic.

    SUBJECTS: Nationally representative samples of 6-9-year-olds (n 15 643).

    RESULTS: All thirteen risk behaviours differed statistically significantly across countries. Highest prevalence estimates of risk behaviours were observed in Bulgaria and lowest in Sweden. Not having breakfast daily and spending screen time ≥2 h/d were clearly positively associated with obesity. The same was true for eating 'foods like pizza, French fries, hamburgers, sausages or meat pies' >3 d/week and playing outside <1 h/d. Surprisingly, other individual unhealthy eating or less favourable physical activity behaviours showed either no or significant negative associations with obesity. A combination of multiple less favourable physical activity behaviours showed positive associations with obesity, whereas multiple unhealthy eating behaviours combined did not lead to higher odds of obesity.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite a categorization based on international health recommendations, individual associations of the thirteen health-risk behaviours with obesity were not consistent, whereas presence of multiple physical activity-related risk behaviours was clearly associated with higher odds of obesity.

  • 27.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    2009-the year of solutions?2009In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28. Yngve, Agneta
    A new academic year2008In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 875-876Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berry important2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 1207-1208Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Challenges for Public Health Nutrition are immense: to be a good public health nutrition leader requires networking and collaboration2006In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 535-537Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Childhood obesity2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 191-192Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci Novum, Unit Prevent Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Children's rights and wrongs2008In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 329-329Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33. Yngve, Agneta
    China calling2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 756-757Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Female students: male power2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 537-538Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folic acid follies2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 863-863Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Food and drink marketing to children: a continuing scandal2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 971-972Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Yngve, Agneta
    Food fights, food peace, love and understanding - and the role of this journal2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38. Yngve, Agneta
    Food fights, food peace, love and understanding - and the role of this journal: Onward2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 2-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39. Yngve, Agneta
    Friends, vouchers, work force and plant foods2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 538-539Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Fruit and vegetable consumption revisited2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 1911-1911Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    In this issue2009In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 443-443Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    In this issue2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 10, p. 1487-1487Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43. Yngve, Agneta
    In this issue Testing, testing2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 864-864Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Making the best of international conferences2009In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 1309-1310Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matters of trust2008In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 220-220Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    News on waists, energy density and Eurodiets2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 755-756Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Dept Biosci & Nutr, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    On authorship, mentorship and responsibility for data accuracy2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 451-452Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scientific publishing, transparency and the role of the medical library2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 215-216Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49. Yngve, Agneta
    Shaping up Europe2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 109-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Unit Publ Hlth Nutr, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shaping up Europe2007In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 109-109Article in journal (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 100
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf