oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Blane, David
    et al.
    Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Quality of life, health and physiological status and change at older ages2008In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 66, no 7, p. 1579-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between self-reported health status and quality of life at older ages is well established. The present paper investigates this relationship further, using objective measures of health and their change over time in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, where positive quality of life at older ages was measured as CASP-19. Cross-sectionally, lung function and obesity, but not blood pressure, were associated with quality of life; these relationships in path analysis were transmitted primarily via functional limitation and more modestly, and only for lung function, via clinical depression. Longitudinally, the results suggest a stable and long-term influence on quality of life of lung function and, among women, body mass index, to which the influence of change may be cumulative; longer follow-up is required to clarify these processes. Overall, the results show that the relationship between health and quality of life is independent of potential psychological confounders, that functional limitation is the key dimension of health in its relationship with quality of life and that clinical depression may be an important mediator between functional limitation and quality of life.

  • 2.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Forss, Anette
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Tishelman, Carol
    From 'silent' to 'heard': professional mediation, manipulation and women's experiences of their body after an abnormal Pap smear2009In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 479-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is a large body of research on cervical cancer screening, fewer studies address the experiences of women receiving abnormal Pap smear results after routine screening. Those studies highlighting such experiences tend to concentrate on resulting psychosocial distress, with an absence in the literature about women's experiences of their bodies during medical follow-up for dysplasia, and no studies were found that explore such experiences over time. In this article, we focus on bodily experiences over time during medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear among a group of women in Sweden. This qualitative analysis is based on interview data from a total of 30 women, and with in-depth analysis of the content of 34 transcribed interviews with nine women who were followed longitudinally. We found that medical follow-up involved an experience of both "having" and "being" a body, which changed over time. Women described a process that ranged from having a cervix that was neither felt, 'heard', nor seen, to having a body that became known to them first indirectly through professional mediation and later through direct experience after professional manipulation. The conceptualization of bodily boundaries appeared to change, e.g. through visualization of the previously unfamiliar cervix, pain, vaginal discharge, and bleeding, as well as linkages to the bodies of women in their extended families through the generations. Thus, bodily experiences appear to be an intrinsic part of medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear through which health, disease, and risks in the past, present, and future were reconceptualised. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Hiyoshi, Ayako
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fall, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Netuveli, G.
    International Centre for Life Course Studies in Society and Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom: Institute for Health and Human Development (IHHD), University of East London, London, United Kingdom.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Remarriage after divorce and depression risk2015In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 141, p. 109-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As marriage is associated with lower depression rates compared with being single in men, we aimed to examine if remarriage compared with remaining divorced is also associated with a reduced depression risk. Swedish register data were used to define a cohort of men who were born between 1952 and 1956 and underwent a compulsory military conscription assessment in adolescence. This study population comprised men who were divorced in 1985 (n = 72,246). The risk of pharmaceutically treated depression from 2005 to 2009 was compared for those who remarried or remained divorced between 1986 and 2004. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios for the risk of depression identified by pharmaceutical treatment, with adjustment for a range of potential confounding factors including childhood and adulthood socioeconomic circumstances, cognitive, physical, psychological and medical characteristics at the conscription assessment. The results showed that, even though divorced men who remarried had markers of lower depression risk in earlier life such as higher cognitive and physical function, higher stress resilience and socioeconomic advantages than men who remained divorced, remarriage was associated with a statistically significant elevated risk of depression with an adjusted hazard ratio (and 95% confidence interval) of 1.27(1.03 1.55), compared with men who remained divorced. Remarriage following divorce is not associated with a reduced risk of depression identified by pharmaceutical treatment, compared with remaining divorced. Interpersonal or financial difficulties resulting from remarriage may outweigh the benefits of marriage in terms of depression risk.

  • 4.
    Hiyoshi, Ayako
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Fukuda, Yoshiharu
    Department of Community Health and Medicine, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Yamaguchi, Japan.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Bartley, Mel
    Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Brunner, Eric J.
    Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    A new theory-based social classification in Japan and its validation using historically collected information2013In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 87, p. 84-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of health inequalities in Japan have increased since the millennium. However, there remains a lack of an accepted theory-based classification to measure occupation-related social position for Japan. This study attempts to derive such a classification based on the National Statistics Socio-economic Classification in the UK. Using routinely collected data from the nationally representative Comprehensive Survey of the Living Conditions of People on Health and Welfare, the Japanese Socioeconomic Classification was derived using two variables - occupational group and employment status. Validation analyses were conducted using household income, home ownership, self-rated good or poor health, and Kessler 6 psychological distress (n ≈ 36,000). After adjustment for age, marital status, and area (prefecture), one step lower social class was associated with mean 16% (p < 0.001) lower income, and a risk ratio of 0.93 (p < 0.001) for home ownership. The probability of good health showed a trend in men and women (risk ratio 0.94 and 0.93, respectively, for one step lower social class, p < 0.001). The trend for poor health was significant in women (odds ratio 1.12, p < 0.001) but not in men. Kessler 6 psychological distress showed significant trends in men (risk ratio 1.03, p = 0.044) and in women (1.05, p = 0.004). We propose the Japanese Socioeconomic Classification, derived from basic occupational and employment status information, as a meaningful, theory-based and standard classification system suitable for monitoring occupation-related health inequalities in Japan.

  • 5.
    Hiyoshi, Ayako
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Fukuda, Yoshiharu
    Department of Community Health and Medicine, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Ube, Japan.
    Shipley, Martin J
    Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Brunner, Eric J
    Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Health inequalities in Japan: the role of material, psychosocial, social relational and behavioural factors2014In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 104, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent that risk factors, identified in Western countries, account for health inequalities in Japan remains unclear. We analysed a nationally representative sample (Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions surveyed in 2001 (n = 40,243)). The cross-sectional association between self-rated fair or poor health and household income and a theory-based occupational social class was summarised using the relative index of inequality [RII]. The percentage attenuation in RII accounted for by candidate contributory factors - material, psychosocial, social relational and behavioural - was computed. The results showed that the RII for household income based on self-rated fair or poor health was reduced after including the four candidate contributory factors in the model by 20% (95% CI 2.1, 43.6) and 44% (95% CI 18.2, 92.5) in men and women, respectively. The RII for the Japanese Socioeconomic Classification [J-SEC] was reduced, not significantly, by 22% (95% CI -6.3, 100.0) in men in the corresponding model, while J-SEC was not associated with self-rated health in women. Material factors produced the most consistent and strong attenuation in RII for both socioeconomic indicators, while the contributions attributable to behaviour alone were modest. Social relational factors consistently attenuated the RII for both socioeconomic indicators in men whereas they did not make an independent contribution in women. The influence of perceived stress was inconsistent and depended on the socioeconomic indicator used. In summary, social inequalities in self-rated fair or poor health were reduced to a degree by the factors included. The results indicate that the levelling of health across the socioeconomic hierarchy needs to consider a wide range of factors, including material and psychosocial factors, in addition to the behavioural factors upon which the current public health policies in Japan focus. The analyses in this study need to be replicated using a longitudinal study design to confirm the roles of different factors in health inequalities.

  • 6.
    Hiyoshi, Ayako
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Udumyan, Ruzan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Osika, Walter
    Center for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Social Sustainability (CSS), Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute Huddinge, Stocholm, Sweden.
    Bihagen, Erik
    Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fall, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Stress resilience in adolescence and subsequent antidepressant and anxiolytic medication in middle aged men: Swedish cohort study2015In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 134, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is unclear whether psychological resilience to stress in adolescence represents a persistent characteristic relevant to the subsequent risk for depression and anxiety in later adulthood. We aimed to test whether low psychological stress resilience assessed in adolescence is associated with an increased risk of receiving medication for depression and anxiety in middle age. We utilized Swedish register-based cohort study. Men born between 1952 and 1956 (n = 175,699), who underwent compulsory assessment for military conscription in late adolescence were followed to examine subsequent risk of pharmaceutically-treated depression and anxiety in middle age, from 2006 to 2009 corresponding to ages between 50 and 58 years, using Cox regression. The associations of stress resilience with prescription of antidepressant and anxiolytics medication through potential mediating factors cognitive and physical function and adult socioeconomic factors were calculated. Low stress resilience was associated with elevated risks for antidepressant (hazard ratio (HR):1.5 (95% CI 1.4 1.6)) and anxiolytics (HR:2.4 (CI 2.0 2.7)) medication. Adjustment for measures of childhood living circumstances attenuated the associations somewhat. Around a third of association with low stress resilience, and a half of that with moderate resilience, was mediated through cognitive and physical function in adolescence and adult socioeconomic factors. The magnitude of the inverse association of higher cognitive function with antidepressant medication was eliminated among those with low stress resilience. These results indicate that low stress resilience in adolescence is associated with an increased risk for antidepressant and anxiolytics medication over 30 years later, in part mediated through developmental factors in adolescence and socioeconomic circumstances in adulthood, and low stress resilience can diminish or eliminate the inverse association of higher cognitive function with antidepressant medication.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Alcohol use and social interactions among adolescents in Sweden: do peer effects exist within and/or between the majority population and immigrants?2010In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 70, no 11, p. 1858-1864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are adolescents who attend schools with a high level of alcohol use and binge drinking more likely to use alcohol and binge drink themselves? This paper analyzes peer effects in adolescent drinking based on a survey of 13,070 adolescents conducted in Sweden in 2005. The empirical analysis uses a multi-level logistic model to account for non-observable heterogeneity between the schools and the results show that attending a school with a high level of alcohol use and frequent binge drinking is a strong predictor of alcohol use and binge drinking for the individual. Hardly any significant interaction effects are detected, implying that peer influence is similar across different adolescent sub-groups. Looking at adolescents with different ethnic backgrounds, it is found that the drinking-pattern of the Swedish majority population has a significant effect on drinking by Swedish individuals and immigrants from Nordic and European countries, but no effect on drinking by immigrants from non-European countries.

  • 8.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?2007In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 833-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent papers in the literature have documented a pro-cyclical effect between business cycles and mortality. In this paper, I explore the relationship between business cycles and incidence, mortality and lethality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Sweden. The sample consists of 21 Swedish regions during the period 1987–2003. Results from the panel data estimations indicate that the business cycle effect is insignificant on overall rates of incidence, mortality and lethality. However, a counter-cyclical and significant effect is found in most specifications for those in prime working age between 20 and 49. Hence, previous recent results from the literature cannot be taken as universal for other countries or settings. It is also shown that a higher share of women, highly educated and non-foreigners decrease incidence and mortality.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf