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  • 1.
    Carlander, Ida
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Being me and being us in a family living close to death at home2011In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 683-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used interpretive description to describe how everyday life close to death was experienced and dealt with in families with one member who had a life-threatening illness. We performed 28 individual, couple, and group interviews with five families. We found two patterns, namely, “being me in a family living close to death” and “being us in a family living close to death.” “Being me” meant that every individual in the family had to deal with the impending death, regardless of whether or not he or she was the person with the life-threatening illness. This was linked to ways of promoting the individual’s self-image, or “me-ness.” This pattern was present at the same time as the pattern of “being us,” or in other words, being a family, and dealing with impending death and a new “we-ness” as a group. “Striving for the optimal way of living close to death” was the core theme.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Paterson, Barbara L.
    Scott-Findlay, Shannon
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Methodological Issues in Interviews Involving people with Communication Impairments After acquired Brain Damage2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 17, no 10, p. 1361-1371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative research has made a significant contribution to the body of knowledge related to how people experience living with various chronic diseases and disabilities, however, the voices of certain vulnerable populations, particularly those with impairments that affect their ability to communicate, are commonly absent. In recent years, a few researchers have attempted to explore the most effective ways to ensure that the voices of people with communication impairments from acquired brain damages can be captured in qualitative research interviews, yet several methodological issues related to including this population in qualitative research remained unexamined. In this article, the authors draw on insights derived from their research on the experiences of adult survivors of stroke and traumatic brain injury to describe methodological issues related to sampling, informed consent, and fatigue in participant and researcher while also making some recommendations for conducting qualitative interviews with these populations.

  • 3.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Palliative Care Reserach, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Being in the Patient Position: Experiences of Health Care Among People With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1116-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to gain in-depth understanding of what it is like for a person with irritable bowel syndrome to be in the patient position in encounters with health care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with nine individuals. Our analysis, guided by interpretive description, revealed experiences of unsupportive and supportive encounters. Unsupportive encounters were shaped by humiliation, insignificance, and abandonment. Not feeling believed and acknowledged as persons made the participants lose trust in their own experience, which enhanced their unfamiliar mood of being in the world. Supportive encounters were less prominent. These were characterized by openness and acknowledgment of the patient’s lifeworld. Feeling significant and being listened to promoted feelings of being in a partnered, cocreating relationship. It is reasonable to assume that care originating in the patient’s lifeworld would support the patients to use their strength to manage illness and regain familiarity in everyday life.

  • 4.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Bernt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Dept Palliat Care Res, Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Knowledge constructions in nursing practice: Understanding and integrating different forms of knowledge2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 1500-1518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this combined ethnographic and hermeneutic study we examined which forms of knowledge nurses make use of and how they construct knowledge. We collected data using participant observations, informal conversations, and interviews. Nurses' knowledge construction took the form of a hermeneutic spiral, a journey in which the nurses moved up and down and horizontally, and in which they created understanding. The nurses constructed knowledge from reading the patient's record, the brief oral handover report, greeting the patient, and reading the patient. By being sensitive, using humor, and emotional involvement, they deepened their understanding. By being suspicious and self-critical, they sought interaction with nurse colleagues, the patient, doctor, and relatives, and obtained additional knowledge. They strove throughout the journey to be one step ahead in their efforts to attain an understanding of the patient's situation. We can relate the knowledge nurses make use of to intertwined forms of episteme, techne, and phronesis

  • 5.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola .
    The encounter between informal and professional care at the end of life2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 258-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to obtain and describe in-depth knowledge about family carers' experiences of the encounter, in a hospital, between informal and professional care at the end of life. A hermeneutic approach was chosen, and we conducted interviews with 27 family carers 6 to 8 months after their loved one's death. In the encounter, the family carers made their own assessment of their loved one's condition and situation. The professionals' attitudes could both promote and impede the interaction between the two forms of care. Family carers' care actions were characterized by struggling to get treatment, being left behind, being partners, keeping the illness at a distance, hovering beside their loved one, waiting for death, and being experts and protectors. The main interpretation of the findings is that family carers possess practical knowledge about what care is the best, or least harmful, for their loved one. This can be linked to what Aristotle called phronesis.

  • 6.
    Maivorsdotter, N.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joacim
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Health as Experience: Exploring Health in Daily Life Drawing From the Work of Aaron Antonovsky and John Dewey2020In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has pursued salutogenic and narrative approaches to deal with questions about how everyday settings are constitutive for different health practices. Healthy behavior is not a distinguishable action, but a chain of activities, often embedded in other social practices. In this article, we have endeavored to describe such a chain of activities guided by the salutogenic claim of exploring the good living argued by McCuaig and Quennerstedt. We use biographical material written by Karl Ove Knausgaard who has created a life story entitled My Struggle. The novel is selected upon an approach influenced by Brinkmann who stresses that literature can be seen as a qualitative social inquiry in which the novelist is an expert in transforming personal life experiences into common human expressions of life. The study illustrates how research with a broader notion of health can convey experiences of health, thereby complementing (and sometimes challenging) public health evidence. 

1 - 6 of 6
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