oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Beckman, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Public Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Health Metrics, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frisen, Ann
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Preference-based health-related quality of life among victims of bullying2016In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: No previous study has estimated the association between bullying and preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQoL) ("utility''), knowledge of which may be used for cost-effectiveness studies of interventions designed to prevent bullying. Therefore, the aim of the study was to estimate preference-based HRQoL among victims of bullying compared to non-victims.

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey data collection among Swedish adolescents aged 15-17 years in the first year of upper secondary school was conducted in the city of Gothenburg in Sweden (N = 758). Preference-based HRQoL was estimated with the SF-6D. Regression analyses were conducted to adjust for some individual-level background variable.

    Results: Mean preference-based health-related quality of life scores were 0.77 and 0.71 for non-victims and victims of bullying, respectively. The difference of 0.06 points was statistically significant (p < 0.05) and robust to inclusion of gender, age, and parental immigrant status.

    Conclusions: The preference-based HRQoL estimates in this study may be used as an upper bound in economic evaluations of bullying prevention interventions, facilitating a comparison between costs and quality-adjusted lifeyears.

  • 2. Hoey, Hilary
    et al.
    McGee, Hannah M
    Fitzgerald, Michael
    Mortensen, Henrik B.
    Hougaard, Philip
    Lynggaard, Helle
    Skovlund, Sören E.
    Aanstoot, Henk-Jan
    Chiarelli, Francesco
    Daneman, Denis
    Danne, Thomas
    Dorchy, Harry
    Garandeau, Patrick
    Greene, Stephen
    Holl, Reinhard
    Kaprio, Eero
    Kocova, Mirjana
    Martul, Pedro
    Matsuura, Nobuo
    Robertson, Kenneth
    Schoenle, Eugen
    Sovik, Oddmund
    Swift, Peter
    Tsou, Rosa Maria
    Vanelli, Maurizio
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Parent and health professional perspectives in the management of adolescents with diabetes: development of assessment instruments for international studies2006In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1033-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Assessment of quality of life (QOL) in adolescents with diabetes requires patient, parent and health professional input. Psychometrically robust instruments to assess parent and professional perspectives are required. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Questionnaires concerning adolescent QOL were developed for completion by parents and health professionals. In an international study assessing QOL in 2,101 adolescents with diabetes (median age 14 years, range 10-18; from 17 countries including Europe, Japan and North America), parents and health professionals completed their respective questionnaires between March and August 1998. RESULTS: Feasibility and acceptability of the new questionnaires were indicated by high questionnaire completion rates (adolescents 92%; parents 89%; health professionals 94%). Internal consistency was confirmed (Cronbach's alpha coefficients 0.80 parent; 0.86 health professional). Correlations of Diabetes Quality of Life Questionnaire for Youths (DQOLY) scores with parent and health professional global QOL ratings were generally low (r ranging from 0.12 to 0.36). Parent-rated burden decreased incrementally across adolescence, particularly for girls. Professional-rated burden followed a similar profile but only after age 15 years. Until then, burden was rated as uniformly high. Clinically relevant discrepancies in parent and professional burden scores were noted for one-parent families and families where adolescents had been referred for psychological help. In both cases, health professionals but not one-parent families perceived these as high burden situations. The clinical significance of this relates to the significantly poorer metabolic control recorded for adolescents in both situations. CONCLUSIONS: Parent and health professional questionnaires were found to have adequate internal consistency, and convergent and discriminant validity in relation to key clinical and QOL outcomes. The questionnaires are brief, easy to administer and score. They may also enable comparisons across countries and languages to facilitate development of international health outcome parameters. The inclusion of the parent and health professional perspectives completes a comprehensive assessment of adolescent QOL relevant to diabetes.

  • 3.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, sweden.
    Sundberg, Kay
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Measurement properties of the 13-item sense of coherence scale using Rasch analysis2015In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 1455-1463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The sense of coherence (SOC) scale is widely used and has an extensive history in research. The psychometric properties of the SOC scale have been investigated using classic test theory, but modern test theory enables a more multifaceted investigation of the properties of the SOC scale. The aim of this study was to explore the measurement properties of the SOC scale using the Rasch measurement model.

    Methods: SOC questionnaires from a sample of 623 healthy adults were analysed using Rasch analysis. Aspects analysed were rating scale functioning, item fit, unidimensionality, differential item functioning (DIF), targeting, and reliability.

    Results: Rating scale analysis showed that the seven scale steps were not utilized in the intended manner and that a shortening to five categories would be beneficial. Twelve out of the 13 items showed acceptable goodness-of-fit and 43 % of the variance was explained by the SOC dimension in the principal components analysis. There was no DIF between subgroups in the sample. The items were well targeted to the sample SOC level with no ceiling or floor effects. Item and person reliability were good and the person separation index was 2.05 indicating that the scale can separate three different levels of SOC, which corresponds well to its theoretical base.

    Conclusions: The SOC scale is generally well functioning; however, the three components of SOC seem to influence the PCA results. The scale would benefit from a reduction from seven to five scale steps, which would need to be investigated further.

  • 4.
    Khanjari, Sedigheh
    et al.
    Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Oskouei, Fatemeh
    Community Hlth, Iran Univ Med Sci, Tehran, Iran.
    Quality of life, Sense of Coherence, Religious and Spiritual aspects in a sample of Iranian family caregivers of patients with breast cancer at the time of diagnosis and six months later2010In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 19, p. 47-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Rohani, Camelia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abedi, Heidar-Ali
    Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Esfahan, Iran.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Use of Structural Equation Modeling to Test the Construct Validity of the Iranian SF-12 Health Survey Version 2 (SF-12v2)2010In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 19, p. 28-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Sluys, Kerstin
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Avdelningen Teknik och Välfärd, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lannge, Margaretha
    Department of Pediatric Emergency Surgery, Astrid Lindgrens’ Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Iselius, Lennart
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lars E.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Infectious Diseases Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge; School of Health Sciences, City University London, UK.
    Six years beyond pediatric trauma: child and parental ratings of children’s health-related quality of life in relation to parental mental health2015In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 24, no 11, p. 2689-2699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To examine the relationship between child self-report and parent proxy report of health-related quality of life (HRQL) and how parents’ mental health status relates to the HRQL ratings 6 years after minor to severe injury of the child.

    Materials and methods

    This cross-sectional cohort study was performed at a regional pediatric trauma center in Stockholm, Sweden. The PedsQL 4.0 versions for ages 5–7, 8–12, and 13–18 years were completed by 177 child–parent dyads 6 years after injury to the child. The parents also rated their own mental health through the mental health domain (MH) in the SF-36 Health Survey.

    Results

    The children’s median age was 13 years (IQR 10–16 years), 54 % were males, and the median ISS was 5 (IQR 2–9). Most of the parents were female (77 %), born in Sweden (79 %), and half had university degrees. There was no statistically significant difference between child self-report and parent proxy report in any of the PedsQL 4.0 scales or summary scales. The levels of agreement between child self-report and parent proxy reports were excellent (ICC ≥ 0.80) for all scales with the exception of emotional functioning (ICC 0.53) which also was the scale with the lowest internal consistency in child self-report (α 0.60). Multiple regression analyses showed that worse parental mental health status correlated with worse child self-report and parent proxy report of children’s HRQL.

    Conclusions

    Children and their parents’ reports on child’s HRQL were in agreement. Decreased mental health in parents was associated with lower scores on parent proxy reports and child self-reports of HRQL after injury. The current investigation highlights the possible relationship between parent’s mental health status and children’s HRQL long after an injury, which should be considered in future investigations and in clinical care.

  • 7.
    Van Damme, Lore
    et al.
    Department of Special Education, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium .
    Colins, Olivier F.
    Curium-Leiden University Medical Centre, Oegstgeest, Netherlands .
    De Maeyer, Jessica
    Department of Special Education, University College Ghent, Ghent, Belgium .
    Vermeiren, Robert
    Curium-Leiden University Medical Centre, Oegstgeest, Netherlands .
    Vanderplasschen, Wouter
    Department of Special Education, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium .
    Girls' quality of life prior to detention in relation to psychiatric disorders, trauma exposure and socioeconomic status2015In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 1419-1429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Practice and research on detained girls has mainly been problem oriented, overlooking these minors' own perspective on and satisfaction with life. The aim of this study was to examine how girls evaluate multiple domains of quality of life (QoL) and how each domain is affected by psychiatric (co)morbidity, trauma, and socioeconomic status (SES).

    Methods An abbreviated version of the World Health Organization (WHO) QoL Instrument was used to assess the girls' (N = 121; M age  = 16.28) QoL prior to detention. This self-report questionnaire consists of two benchmark items referring to their overall QoL and health, and 24 remaining items measuring their QoL regarding four domains (physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment). The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV was used to assess the past-year prevalence of psychiatric disorders and life-time trauma exposure.

    Results: Detained girls perceived their QoL almost as good as the 12- to 20-year-olds from the WHO's international field trial on all but one domain (i.e., psychological health). They were most satisfied with their social relationships and least satisfied with their psychological health. Psychiatric disorders, trauma, and low SES were distinctively and negatively related to various domains of QoL. The girls' psychological health was most adversely affected by psychosocial and socioeconomic problems, while these variables had an almost negligible impact on their satisfaction with their social relationships.

    Conclusions: The particularity of each domain of QoL supports a multidimensional conceptualization of QoL. Regarding treatment, psychological health appears as a domain of major concern, while social relationships might serve as a source of resilience.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf