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  • 1.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanging up the shirt: an autoethnographic account of disengaging from a social rugby culture2016In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 711-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violent practices are a common feature of homosocial sporting environments. The objective of the current paper is to explore how one individual disengaged from a sporting community characterized by such practices. An autoethnographic approach involving recollection and interactional exchanges is used to create a realist narrative account which offers insight into the process of disengagement. The narrative focuses on the: (1) ongoing nature of cultural participation; (2) agency and the restriction of ways of being in sports teams and (3) the durable nature of personal characteristics that are learned in sporting environments. These issues are discussed in light of cultural learning theory and specifically, the analytic concept, ‘becoming’. The paper concludes with methodological reflections and a consideration of directions for future research.

  • 2.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grahn, Karin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shifting, crossing and transforming gender boundaries in physical cultures2016In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 615-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the 2013 conference “Gender in Physical Culture” of the ‘Transnational Working Group for the Study of Gender and Sport’, held at the University of Gothenburg, a number of presentations related to how individuals, groups of individuals and organizations challenge and change dominant gender discourses and practices. Several of these presentations have come to form this volume on ‘Gender in Physical Culture: Crossing Boundaries – Reconstituting Cultures’. To begin the volume, the following article outlines how the seven contributions are connected. We present Lamont and Molnàr’s (2002) idea of ‘boundaries’, which they consider as visible and invisible socially constructed borders that create social differences. Such boundaries are, however, malleable. We propose that this flexibility means that ‘gender boundaries in physical cultures’ can be shifted, crossed and transformed. The case studies included in this edition present concrete examples of how this is possible.

  • 3. Jonasson, Kalle
    et al.
    Thiborg, Jesper
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Electronic sport and its impact on future sport2010In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 287-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mere mentioning of computer gaming (E-sport) as a form of sports is subversive, according to public health and media discourses. As a matter of fact, the two practices are considered to be oppositional. Sports are often regarded as a virtue, whereas computer gaming is looked upon as a vice. In this light, the basic aim of this essay is to discuss and analyse the ‘sporting qualities’ of competitive computer gaming in relation to the definition of sport. The reasoning will also forecast the future of competitive computer gaming. How might this new form of ‘sport’ develop and what impact will it have on future sports in general? We answer the question by presenting three possible futuristic scenarios. Might it even be that we are standing on the threshold of a new phase in the evolution of sports?

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