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  • 1.
    Ahren, Maria
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Selegard, Linnea
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Soderlind, Fredrik
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Engstrom, Maria
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Kall, Per-Olov
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Synthesis and Characterization of PEGylated Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for MRI Contrast Enhancement2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 5753-5762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, much attention has been given to the development of biofunctionalized nanoparticles with magnetic properties for novel biomedical imaging. Guided, smart, targeting nanoparticulate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents inducing high MRI signal will be valuable tools for future tissue specific imaging and investigation of molecular and cellular events. In this study. We report a new design of functionalized ultrasmall rare earth based nanoparticles to be used as a positive contrast agent in NI RI. The relaxivity is compared to commercially available Gd based chelates. The synthesis, PEGylation, and dialysis of small (3-5 nm) gadolinium oxide (DEG-Gd2O3) nanoparticles are presented. The chemical and physical properties of the nanomaterial were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Neutrophil activation after exposure to this nanomaterial was studied by means of fluorescence microscopy. The proton relaxation times as a function of dialysis time and functionalization were measured at 1.5 T. A capping procedure introducing stabilizing properties was designed and verified, and the dialysis effects were evaluated. A higher proton relaxivity was obtained for as-synthesized diethylene glycol (DEG)-Gd2O3 nanoparticles compared to commercial Gd-DTPA. A slight decrease of the relaxivity for as-synthesized DEG-Gd2O3 nanoparticles as a function of dialysis time was observed. The results for functionalized nanoparticles showed a considerable relaxivity increase for particles dialyzed extensively with r(1) and r(2) values approximately 4 times the corresponding values for Gd-DTPA. The microscopy study showed that PEGylated nanoparticles do not activate neutrophils in contrast to uncapped Gd2O3. Finally, the nanoparticles are equipped with Rhodamine to show that our PEGylated nanoparticles are available for further coupling chemistry, and thus prepared for targeting purposes. The long term goal is to design a powerful, directed contrast agent for MRI examinations with specific targeting possibilities and with properties inducing local contrast, that is. an extremely high MR signal at the cellular and molecular level.

  • 2.
    Basabe-Desmonts, L.
    et al.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ramström, Sofia
    BDI Programme, Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, G.
    BDI Programme, Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    O'Neill, S.
    BDI Programme, Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    Riaz, A.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland.
    Lee, L. P.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland; Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center, Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley CA, USA.
    Ricco, A. J.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland.
    Kenny, D.
    BDI Programme, Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    Single-Step Separation of Platelets from Whole Blood Coupled with Digital Quantification by Interfacial Platelet Cytometry (iPC)2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 18, p. 14700-14706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the efficient single-step separation of individual platelets from unprocessed whole blood, enabling digital quantification of platelet function using interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC) on a chip iPC is accomplished by the precision micropatterning of platelet-specific protein surfaces on solid substrates By separating platelets From whole blood using specific binding to protein spots of a defined size. iPC implements a simple incubate-and-rinse approach, without sample preparation, that enables (I) the study of platelets in the physiological situation of interaction with a protein surface, (2) the choice of the number of platelets bound on each protein spot, from one to many, (3) control of the platelet platelet distance, including the possibility to study noninteracting single platelets, (4) digital quantification (counting) of platelet adhesion to selected protein matrices, enabling statistical characterization of platelet subpopuladons from meaningfully large numbers of single platelets, (5) the study of platelet receptor expression and spatial distribution, and (6) a detailed study of the morphology of isolated single platelets at activation levels that can be manipulated To date, we have demonstrated 1-4 of the above list Platelets were separated from whole blood using tPC with fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and anti-CD42b antibody printed "spots" ranging from a fraction of one to several platelet diameters (2-24 full) The number of platelets captured per spot depends strongly on the protein matrix and the surface area of the spot, together with the platelet volume, morphology, and activation state Blood samples from healthy donors, a May-Hegglin-anomaly patient, and a Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia patient were analyzed via iPC to confirm the specificity of the interaction between protein matrices and platelets For example, the results indicate that platelets interact with fibrinogen spots only through the fibrinogen receptor (aIlb beta 3) and, relevant to diagnostic applications, platelet adhesion correlates strongly with normal versus abnormal platelet function A critical function of platelets is to adhere to regions of damage on blood vessel walls, in contrast to conventional flow cytometry, where platelets are suspended in solution, iPC enables physiologically relevant platelet bioassays based on platelet/protein-matrix inter actions on surfaces. This technology should be inexpensive to implement in clinical assay format, is readily integrable into fluidic microdevices, and paves the way for high-throughput platelet assays from microliter volumes of whole blood.

  • 3.
    Chatzidaki, Maria D.
    et al.
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece; MTM, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos
    Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Alexandraki, Voula
    Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Tsirvouli, Eirini
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Chakim, Zena
    Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Athens, Greece.Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Ghazal, Aghiad
    Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mortensen, Kell
    Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Yaghmur, Anan
    Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salentinig, Stefan
    Laboratory for Biointerfaces, Department of Materials Meet Life, Empa. Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Papadimitriou, Vassiliki
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Tsakalidou, Effie
    Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Xenakis, Aristotelis
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece; MTM, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Microemulsions as Potential Carriers of Nisin: Effect of Composition on Structure and Efficacy2016In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, no 35, p. 8988-8998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions based on either refined olive oil (ROO) or sunflower oil (SO), distilled monoglycerides (DMG), and ethanol were used as nisin carriers in order to ensure its effectiveness as a biopreservative. This work presents experimental evidence on the effects of ethanol concentration, hydration, the nature of oil, and the addition of nisin on the nanostructure of the proposed inverse microemulsions as revealed by electrical conductivity measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Modeling of representative SAXS profiles was applied to gain further insight into the effects of ethanol and solubilized water content on the inverse swollen micelles' size and morphology. With increasing ethanol content, the overall size of the inverse micelles decreased, whereas hydration resulted in an increase in the micellar size due to the penetration of water into the hydrophilic core of the inverse swollen micelles (hydration-induced swelling behavior). The dynamic properties of the surfactant monolayer were also affected by the nature of the used vegetable oil, the ethanol content, and the presence of the bioactive molecule, as evidenced by EPR spin probing experiments. According to simulation on the experimental spectra, two populations of spin probes at different polarities were revealed. The antimicrobial effect of the encapsulated nisin was evaluated using the well diffusion assay (WDA) technique against Lactococccus lactis. It was found that this encapsulated bacteriocin induced an inhibition of the microorganism growth. The effect was more pronounced at higher ethanol concentrations, but no significant difference was observed between the two used vegetable oils (ROO and SO).

  • 4.
    Kalaitzaki, Argyro
    et al.
    Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece; School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Papanikolaou, Nikos E.
    Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Kifisiá, Greece.
    Karamaouna, Filitsa
    Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Kifisiá, Greece.
    Dourtoglou, Vassilis
    VIORYL S.A., Afidnes, Greece.
    Xenakis, Aristotelis
    Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece; School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Papadimitriou, Vassiliki
    Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Biocompatible colloidal dispersions as potential formulations of natural pyrethrins: a structural and efficacy study2015In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 31, no 21, p. 5722-5730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biocompatible colloidal dispersions the micro- and nanoemulsion type-based on lemon oil terpenes polysorbates, water and glycerol were used for the formulation of pyrethrins, botanical insecticides derived from the white pyrethrum daisy, Tanacetum cinerariifolium. The proposed formulation is based on pyrethrin-containing (W/O) microemulsions that could be diluted in one step with an aqueous phase to obtain kinetically stable oil-in-water (O/W) nanoemulsions. Structural characteristics of the micro- and nanoemulsions were evaluated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrical, conductivity: Dynamic properties of the surfactant monolayer as evidenced by EPR measurements were affected by the water content, the surfactant, and also the presence of the biocide DLS and SAXS experiments of the nanoemulsions indicated the existence of two populations of oil drop-lets dispersed in the aqueous phase, globular droplets of 36-37 nm in diameter, and also larger droplets with diameter's >150 nm. All of the applied techniques for structural determination revealed the participation of the biocide in the nanostructure. The insecticidal effect of the encapsulated natural pyrethrin was evaluated in laboratory bioassays upon a target-insect pest, the cotton aphid Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in eggplant, and was found to be increased compared to the commercial pyrethrin formulation.

1 - 4 of 4
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