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  • 1.
    Bjørnholt, Margunn
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Sociology and Human Geography , University of Oslo , Blindern, Oslo, Norway.
    How men became the local agentsof change towards gender equality2008In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Work-Sharing Couples Study was an action research project conducted in the early 1970s to reconcile work, family and gender equality in families. Its design involved both spouses working part-time and sharing childcare and housework. This article is based on a follow-up study of the original couples 30 years later. The men played a key role in initiating work-sharing in their families and how the men becameagents of change is the topic of the article. Biographical influences from their families of origin and domestic skills, facilitated by the contemporary concept of a modern, profeminist masculinity, were important background factors, and promoting the careers of wives emerged as an important motivational factor. Their authoritative agency in promoting more egalitarian patterns of work and care in their own families also invokes the question of a constructive use of male power. This could give rise to a further discussion of power and masculinity and men as agents of change towards gender equality.

  • 2.
    de Boise, Sam
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art. Department of Sociology, Wentworth College, University of York, Heslington, UK.
    Contesting ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ difference in emotions through music use in the UK2016In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 66-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article builds on social psychological critiques of ‘hardwired’ gender difference inemotions, looking at the topic through the emotional use of music. Starting from thepremise that gender differences in emotion are socially and discursively constructedrather than innate, it moves on to challenge existing work in which masculinity andfemininity are treated as singular, oppositional concepts, that are ‘normally’ attached toideas of existing sex differences. Drawing on data, generated from a UK-based onlinesurvey of 914 respondents (male = 361; female = 553), this article highlights thatwhilst gender plays a significant part in shaping the emotional experience of music, thisis often mediated heavily by age and personal experience. It suggests that music is apractical means of moving beyond ideas of differences in gender or sex differences inemotional display, towards ideas of diversity, especially given that existing face-to-face research has often found men to be ‘unable’ to communicate emotional experiencein particular ways. Both inductive quantitative trends and open-ended fragments frompeople’s emotional experiences of music are included in order to demonstrate howemotions and gender intersect discursively.

  • 3.
    Egeberg Holmgren, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Gender Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Huddersfield University, UK; Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Framing ‘men in feminism’: theoretical locations, local contexts and practical passings in men’s gender-conscious positionings on gender equality and feminism2009In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 403-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses some aspects of the 'Man Question' in feminism, by way of the analysis of men's diverse gender-conscious positionings in relation to gender, gender equality and feminism. It builds on earlier work, making use of theoretical models in feminist literature combined with the micro-sociological concept of passing. The article is primarily concerned with the theoretical and empirical complexities, contradictions and ambiguities of men's positionings, as when they are self-defined as 'feminists' (or similar identifications) in radical or deconstructive ways. In this, Swedish interview data are used. Sweden is considered particularly interesting, with a qualified societal consensus on gender equality and a broadly positive place accorded to men's relations with feminism. The authors argue in the final section that there is a need to further dialogue between analyses of men/masculinities and the multidimensionality of feminisms, as well as a need for more empirical studies of men's different (pro) feminist positionings in order to elaborate the theoretical implications of different social contexts. The framing presented seeks to provide greater possibilities for such complex, nuanced and situated understandings of men's relation to feminism, theoretically, analytically and politically.

  • 4.
    Hall, Matthew
    et al.
    School of Health and Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, UK; School of Psychology, Ulster University, Coleraine, UK.
    Hearn, Jeff
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Management and Organisation, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Social and Health Studies, University of South Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Revenge pornography and manhood acts: A discourse analysis of perpetrators’ accounts2019In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 158-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Revenge pornography (hereafter, revenge porn) is the online, sometimes offline, non-consensual distribution or sharing, of explicit images of someone else by ex-partners, partners, others or hackers seeking revenge or entertainment – also referred to as non-consensual pornography. The vast majority of revenge porn is committed by men on women ex-partners. In this paper, we discursively analyse men’s electronic texts accompanying their posting of explicit images on arguably the most popular revenge porn-specific website MyEx.com. Situating our analysis as a contemporary form of online gendered violence and abuse, we show the complex ways in which manhood acts are invoked by men to account for their practices. The impacts on victims/survivors and possible interventions are also discussed.

  • 5.
    Pitti, Ilaria
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Center for Studies on Civic Engagement, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Sociology and Business Law, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Being women in a male preserve: an ethnography of female football ultras2019In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 318-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article looks at the characteristics of contemporary sports audiences from the perspective of gender, focusing on the phenomenon of female ultras or ‘professional’ football fans. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in an Italian football ultras group composed of male and female fans, this paper offers an analysis of female participation in communities of organized supporters. In examining the role and position of women inside the considered group, the paper pays attention to their perception of the existing gender differences showing how female ultras explain inequalities on the basis of ‘natural’ and ‘innate’ differences and capacities between men and women. Existing patterns of male dominance are supported by female fans’ own discourses and performance of their gender identity in the ‘male preserve’. Rather than questioning male dominance and gender hierarchies, female supporters’ efforts appear aimed at being recognized as ultras ‘despite being women’.

  • 6.
    Saeidzadeh, Zara
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    "Are trans men the manliest of men?": Gender practices, trans masculinity and mardanegi in contemporary Iran2019In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I examine how trans men who undergo or plan to undergo medical transition construe their masculinity or mardanegi (I follow IJMES's transliteration guide - Persian to English) in Persian language, through certain gender practices that manifest their manhood as manly, real and psychologically well. I argue that trans men in Iran practice masculinity in ways that is not only in strong entanglement with women but also is distanced from non-trans heterosexual men, trans women and gay men. Drawing on 14 semi-structured interviews with trans men in Iran as part of a bigger project on sex change in contemporary Iran, I explain that trans men's masculinity in Iran is a localized, traditional-modern kind of trans masculinity that distinguishes itself from other gender groups due to trans men's specificity of gender location.

1 - 6 of 6
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