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  • 1.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center (UFC).
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    The headset as an interactional resource in a video relay interpreting (VRI) setting2018In: Interpreting, ISSN 1384-6647, E-ISSN 1569-982X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 285-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video relay interpreting (VRI) enables communication between a signed language user, remotely connected to an interpreter by videophone, and an interlocutor in spoken contact with the interpreter by telephone. Both users of the service are physically separated from each other and from the interpreter, who is in a studio. Essential technical components of the system include such items as videophones, telephones, computers, software, and a headset. This article explores how the interpreter orients towards the headset, turning it into an interactional resource. Examples of how this is done are identified in extracts from a corpus of VRI conversations between users of Swedish Sign Language (SSL) and spoken Swedish. Ethical approval and all participants' consent were obtained. Three practices were identified: pointing towards the headset, orienting towards it in other ways (positioning, gesturing, direction of gaze), and holding it. All these practices have concrete pragmatic implications for the various steps in communication, such as establishing reference, repairs, and turn allocation. Enhancing VRI interpreters' awareness of how equipment like a headset helps to organize the interaction is important, with a view to ensuring that the available technology is used to best effect for purposes of communication.

  • 2.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    The positioning and bimodal mediation of the interpreter in a Video Relay Interpreting (VRI) service setting2016In: Interpreting, ISSN 1384-6647, E-ISSN 1569-982X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 198-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the interpreter’s positioning in a Video Relay Interpreting (VRI) service that offers bimodal mediation between people using Swedish Sign Language (SSL) and people using spoken Swedish. Positioning subsumes the ways in which interpreters orient themselves to the contingencies of the setting on a moment-by-moment basis, in relation to the impact of technology, participants’ knowledge asymmetries (e.g., prior experience of VRI), their physical separation, and the need for two arenas (visual and auditive). The interpreting is bimodal, each of the two users being in direct contact with the interpreter through a different medium (telephone for one, videophone for the other). Nine excerpts from two calls within the VRI service serve as examples to show how the interpreter’s positioning emerges dynamically in relation to contingent variables of the setting, such as the initial importance of briefing users on the service, temporary loss of sound and image, the perceived need to inform either user of extralinguistic items, or situational awareness that it is time to conclude the interaction. This new research perspective on VRI can afford a better understanding of its moment-by-moment complexity and specificities, thus helping improve it and train interpreters better for it.

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CiteExportLink to result list
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
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