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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Follow-up questions in political press conferences2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 14, p. 3331-3344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of how journalists use follow-up questions in political press conferences. This ambition also involves a critical examination of the previous research on follow-up questions in this context. For the journalists, a press conference is a time when they have the opportunity to hold politicians accountable for their words and actions, which is a task often seen as a core democratic function of journalism. By asking a follow-up, a journalist can pursue an evasive answer and perform this watchdog role. In total, 6 press conferences from 2009 with the Swedish Government have been analyzed, comprising 29 sequences with follow-up questions. The analysis is organized around the following questions: How are follow-up turns related to initial questions and preceding answers? In what kind of situations do journalists perform adversarial actions and pursue the politician with their follow-up turn? What other kinds of actions are performed through follow-up questions? An essential conclusion is that follow-ups are not necessarily such prominent indicators of adversarialness as previous research suggests. Instead, a clear majority, 18 of 29, of follow-up uestions are nonadversarial in character and used for other purposes than challenging the politicians’ answers.

  • 2.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Pseudo-parliamentary discourse in a communist dictatorship: dissenter Parvulescu vs. dictator Ceausescu2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 924-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a case study of an unprecedented political event that occurred in Romania during the Communist dictatorship. In 1979, at the 12th Congress of the Romanian Communist Party, Constantin Parvulescu, a high-ranking party official, took the floor unexpectedly and attacked the dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. We examine the contrasting interaction patterns displayed during the open confrontation that occurred between Parvulescu's accusatory anti-Ceausescu discourse and the subsequent anti-Parvulescu discourses of three of Ceausescu's close political allies glorifying Ceausescu and the Communist party. In order to enable it better understanding of the political and socio-cultural setting of the Communist party congress proceedings, as well as of the concrete implications of sequencing and simultaneity of speech, interpersonal behaviour and shifts in speech targeting, a multimodal approach has been integrated with a discourse-analytical approach. These two combined approaches were used to examine the videotaped event and to account for the overall picture of the interaction, which consists of verbal interaction, kinesic behaviour (such as gestures, facial expressions, body posture), as well as the use of space. The analytical focus has been on the challenging and aggressive uses of multiple audience-targeted illocutionary acts and perlocutionary effects, the strategic uses of personal pronouns and the manipulative uses of semiotic metaphors, (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Pseudo-parliamentary discourse in a Communist dictatorship: Dissenter Parvulescu vs. dictator Ceausescu (vol 42, pg 924, 2010)2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2347-2347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Strategic uses of parliamentary forms of address: The case of the U.K. Parliament and the Swedish Riksdag (vol 42, pg 885, 2010)2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2347-2347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Habiliteringens Forskningscentrum (HFC), School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Department of Culture and Communication, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Turn-organisation in mediated phone interaction using Video Relay Service (VRS)2012In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1313-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technical development has created new arenas of communication for people. One such arena is the Video Relay Service (VRS). The VRS facilitates interaction between people who use visual/gestual sign language on a video phone, and people who use verbal/auditive language on the telephone/mobile phone. The interaction is mediated by a sign language interpreter. The interpreter is the only person in the setting who is directly linked to the others, and all participants are physically separated fromeach other. The interpreter plays a key role in the interaction, administratingandco-ordinatingthe talk. In order to doso, the interpreter usesarange of different techniques andstrategies. It is the purpose of the current article to describe, analyse and discuss the turn-organisation of the VRS. The article demonstrates how the interpreter is a power figure, who may sanction or not sanction an utterance. The interpreter also manages the turn-taking machinery by means of visible and audible techniques, as well as rendition strategies. The interpreter is not only a mediator, but a co-creator of the interaction; a part that relates dynamically, and makes the participants relate dynamically, to the specific setting of the service.

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