oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cone, David C
    et al.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven CT, USA.
    Serra, John
    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, San Diego CA, USA.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Research and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comparison of the SALT and Smart triage systems using a virtual reality simulator with paramedic students2011In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 314-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Virtual reality systems may allow for organized study of mass casualty triage systems by allowing investigators to replicate the same mass casualty incident, with the same victims, for a large number of rescuers. The study objectives were to develop such a virtual reality system, and use it to assess the ability of trained paramedic students to triage simulated victims using two triage systems.

    METHODS: Investigators created 25 patient scenarios for a highway bus crash in a virtual reality simulation system. Paramedic students were trained to proficiency on the new 'Sort, Assess, Life saving interventions, Treat and Transport (SALT)' triage system, and 22 students ran the simulation, applying the SALT algorithm to each victim. After a 3-month washout period, the students were retrained on the 'Smart' triage system, and each student ran the same crash simulation using the Smart system. Data inputs were recorded by the simulation software and analyzed with the paired t-tests.

    RESULTS: The students had a mean triage accuracy of 70.0% with SALT versus 93.0% with Smart (P=0.0001). Mean overtriage was 6.8% with SALT versus 1.8% with Smart (P=0.0015), and mean undertriage was 23.2% with SALT versus 5.1% with Smart (P=0.0001). The average time for a student to triage the scene was 21 min 3 s for SALT versus 11 min 59 s for Smart (P=0.0001).

    CONCLUSION: The virtual reality platform seems to be a viable research tool for examining mass casualty triage. A small sample of trained paramedic students using the virtual reality system was able to triage simulated patients faster and with greater accuracy with 'Smart' triage than with 'SALT' triage.

  • 2.
    Djärv, Therese
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Section of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtenson, Linda
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Section of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Decreased general condition in the emergency department: high in-hospital mortality and a broad range of discharge diagnoses2015In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 241-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased general condition (DGC) is a frequent presenting complaint within the Adaptive Triage Process. DGC describes a nonspecific decline in health and well-being, and it is common among elderly patients in the emergency department (ED).

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the in-hospital mortality among patients presenting with DGC with that among patients in the corresponding triage category presenting with other complaints to an ED. The secondary aim was to describe the discharge diagnoses of patients presenting with DGC.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to Södersjukhuset from the ED in 2008 were included. The difference in the in-hospital mortality rate was stratified for triage category at the ED, between patients with DGC (n=1182) and those with all other presenting complaints (n=20 775), and assessed with sex-adjusted and age-adjusted logistic regression models. Discharge diagnoses were assessed as the primary discharge diagnosis according to International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th revision (ICD-10) in the medical discharge notes.

    RESULTS: A total of 1182 patients with DGC at the ED were admitted for in-hospital care, and they had a four-fold risk of suffering an in-hospital death [odds ratio 4.74 (95% confidence interval 3.88-5.78)] compared with patients presenting with other presenting complaints. The most common discharge diagnoses were diseases of the circulatory system (14%), respiratory system (14%), and genitourinary system (10%).

    INTERPRETATION: Patients presenting with DGC to an ED often receive low triage priority, frequently require admission for in-hospital care, and, because of the three-fold increased risk of in-hospital death compared with others, belong to a high-risk group.

  • 3.
    Dryver, Eric T
    et al.
    Emergency Department, Skane's University Hospital, Akutkliniken, Lund, Sweden; Practicum Clinical Skills Centre, Region Skåne, Lund/Malmö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Anesthesiology Department, Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Patrik
    Södersjukhus Hospital, Stockholm's County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Södersjukhus Hospital, Karolinska Institution, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Swedish specialist examination in emergency medicine: form and function2017In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM/BACKGROUND: The purpose of the Swedish specialist examination in Emergency Medicine is not only to determine whether residents have attained the level of competence of specialists, but also to guide and facilitate residency training.

    METHODS: The Swedish Society for Emergency Medicine has developed checklists that delineate criteria of consideration and action items for particular processes. These checklists are freely available and used to assess competence during the examination. They are also intended for use during teaching and clinical care, thus promoting alignment between clinical practice, teaching and assessment. The examination is carried out locally by residency program educators, thereby obviating travel expenses. It consists of a total of 24 stations and over 100 potential scenarios, thereby minimizing case specificity. Each station consists of a scenario based on a real case. The checklists allow for direct feedback to the examinee after each station.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: This model may be of interest to other European countries.

  • 4.
    Hruska, Katrin
    et al.
    Emergency Department, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Department of Emergency Medicine and Services, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Banerjee, JAY
    University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK.
    Behringer, Wilhelm
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Jena University, Jena, Germany.
    Bjørnsen, Lars P.
    Department of Emergency Medicine and Pre-hospital Services, St Olav’s Hospital HF, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Cameron, Peter
    Department of Emergency Medicine and Pre-hospital Services, St Olav’s Hospital HF, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Einav, Sharon
    S´haare Zedek Medical Centre and Hebrew University Faculty of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Holroyd, Brian R.
    Emergency Strategic Clinical Network, Alberta Health Services, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada.
    Jones, Peter
    Department of Surgery, Universtiy of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Department of Emergency Medicine Research, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Lassen, Annmarie
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Truesdal, Melinda
    The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Australia.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Template for uniform reporting of emergency department measures, consensus according to the Utstein method2018In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop a template for uniform reporting of standardized measuring and describing of care provided in the emergency department (ED).

    Methods: An international group of experts in emergency medicine, with broad experience from different clinical settings, met in Utstein, Norway. Through a consensus process, a limited number of measures that would accurately describe an ED were chosen and a template was developed.

    Results: The final measures to be reported and their definitions were grouped into six categories: Structure, Staffing and governance, Population, Process times, Hospital and healthcare system and Outcomes. The template for Utstein-style uniform reporting is presented.

    Conclusion: The suggested template is intended for use in studies carried out in EDs to improve comparability and knowledge translation.

  • 5.
    Kurland, Lisa
    et al.
    Swedish Society for Emergency Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Research and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Emergency Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Graham, Colin A
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Chinese University, Hong Kong, China.
    Emergency medicine development in the Nordic countries2014In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 163-163Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lo, Ronson S L
    et al.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Brabrand, Mikkel
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Hospital of South West Jutland, Odense University, Odense, Denmark; Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Graham, Colin A
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
    Sepsis - where are the emergency physicians?2016In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 159-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Madsen, Michael
    et al.
    Silkeborg Hospital and University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kiuru, Sampsa
    Ashburton Hospital, Canterbury DHB, New Zealand; University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Castrèn, Maaret
    Department of Emergency Medicine and Services, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Emergency Medicine and Services, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Emergency Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The level of evidence for emergency department performance indicators: systematic review2015In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 298-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive systematic review of emergency department performance indicators in relation to evidence. A systematic search was performed through PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and COCHRANE databases with (and including synonyms of) the search words: [emergency medicine OR emergency department] AND [quality indicator(s) OR performance indicator(s) OR performance measure(s)]. Articles were included according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria using the PRISMA protocol. The level of evidence was rated according to the evidence levels by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Performance indicators were extracted and organized into five categories; outcome, process, satisfaction, equity and structural/organizational measures. Six thousand four hundred and forty articles were initially identified; 127 provided evidence for/against a minimum of one performance indicator: these were included for further study. Of the 127 articles included, 113 (92%) were primary research studies and only nine (8%) were systematic reviews. Within the 127 articles, we found evidence for 202 individual indicators. Approximately half (n=104) of all this evidence (n=202) studied process-type indicators. Only seven articles (6%) qualified for high quality (level 1b). Sixty-six articles (51%) were good retrospective quality (level 2b or better), whereas the remaining articles were either intermediate quality (25% level 3a or 3b) or poor quality (17% level 4 or 5). We found limited evidence for most emergency department performance indicators, with the majority presenting a low level of evidence. Thus, a core group of evidence-based performance indicators cannot currently be recommended on the basis of this broad review of the literature.

  • 8.
    Madsen, Michael M.
    et al.
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kiuru, Sampsa
    Ashburton Hospital, Canterbury DHB, New Zealand; University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Castrèn, Maaret
    Department of Emergency Medicine and Services, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Emergency Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Research into the evidence basis for widely used emergency department performance indicators should be prioritized2016In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 396-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Wallgren, Ulrika M
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Research and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Fisksätra Vårdcentral, Saltsjöbaden, Sweden.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Department of Clinical Research and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Section of Emergency Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, Alexandra E V
    Department of Clinical Research and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Research and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Section of Emergency Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Identification of adult septic patients in the prehospital setting: a comparison of two screening tools and clinical judgment2014In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 260-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Timely identification and treatment of sepsis is crucial for patient outcome. The aim of this study was to compare two previously unvalidated prehospital sepsis screening tools with clinical judgment by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel with respect to identification of septic patients.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We carried out a retrospective cross-sectional study of 353 adult patients, transported by the EMS, with a hospital discharge International Classification of Diseases code consistent with sepsis. We analyzed EMS records for the identification of sepsis according to two screening tools and clinical judgment by EMS providers. The Robson screening tool includes temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, altered mental status, plasma glucose, and a history suggestive of a new infection. BAS 90-30-90 refers to the vital signs: oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, and systolic blood pressure. McNemar's two related samples test was used to compare the sensitivity of the two screening tools with the sensitivity of clinical judgment.

    RESULTS: The Robson screening tool had a sensitivity of 75% (18 out of 24 patients for whom all parameters were documented, P<0.001, as compared with clinical judgment). BAS 90-30-90 had a sensitivity of 43% (76 out of 175 patients, P<0.001). EMS personnel documented suspected sepsis in 42 out of 353 (12%) patients with sepsis.

    CONCLUSION: The Robson screening tool had a sensitivity superior to both BAS 90-30-90 and clinical judgment. This supports our hypothesis that the implementation of a screening tool could lead to increased prehospital identification of sepsis, which may enable a more timely treatment of these patients.

  • 10.
    Yanagizawa-Drott, Lisa
    et al.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Neville House, Boston MA, United States; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, United States.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Emergency Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schuur, Jeremiah D
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Neville House, Boston MA, United States; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, United States.
    Infection prevention practices in Swedish emergency departments: results from a cross-sectional survey2015In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 338-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality. Emergency departments (EDs) are a potential source of HAIs as they are the site for large volumes of patients in tight quarters and often focus on immediate life threats over prevention. We aimed to estimate the extent to which Swedish EDs have adopted evidence-based measures to prevent HAIs. The second aim was to identify predictors of high hand hygiene compliance.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We developed a survey on the basis of an instrument used in a US survey in 2011. We modified the survey to reflect Swedish ED practice, and emailed it to ED directors between February and April 2012. We calculated proportions, odds ratios, and 95% confidence intervals, and used logistic regression to adjust for independent variables.

    RESULTS: We received responses from 59 of Sweden's 72 EDs (82%). Thirty-nine percent of EDs participate in a project to improve hand hygiene compliance. Staff hand hygiene compliance rates were audited at least monthly in 45% of EDs. Forty-three percent reported a compliance rate of 80% or more. The only independent predictor of greater than 80% hand hygiene compliance was auditing compliance frequently - at least monthly (odds ratio 6.3, 95% confidence interval 1.7-24, P=0.01). A majority of Swedish EDs (58%) have a written policy for the appropriate use of urinary catheters. Twenty-one percent participate in a project to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    CONCLUSION: A minority of Swedish EDs are participating in projects to address hand hygiene and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. Frequent auditing of hand hygiene compliance may improve compliance rates.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf