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  • 1.
    Alsterholm, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svedbom, Axel
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris D.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holm Sommar, Lena
    Stockholm Hud, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivert, Lina U.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lundeberg, Lena
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sandström Falk, MariHelen
    Capio Skin, Carlanderska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shayesteh, Alexander
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Andreas
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Marie
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Dermatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vrang, Sophie
    Patients' organization Atopikerna, The Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bradley, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Establishment and Utility of SwedAD: A Nationwide Swedish Registry for Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Receiving Systemic Pharmacotherapy2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv7312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SwedAD, a Swedish nationwide registry for patients with atopic dermatitis receiving systemic pharmacotherapy, was launched on 1 September 2019. We describe here the establishment of a user-friendly registry to the benefit of patients with atopic dermatitis. By 5 November 2022, 38 clinics had recorded 931 treatment episodes in 850 patients with an approximate national coverage rate of 40%. Characteristics at enrolment included median Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) 10.2 (interquartile range 4.0, 19.4), Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) 18.0 (10.0, 24.0), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 11.0 (5.0, 19.0) and Peak Itch Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) 6.0 (3.0, 8.0). At 3 months, median EASI was 3.2 (1.0, 7.3) and POEM, DLQI, and NRS-11 were improved. Regional coverage varied, reflecting the distribution of dermatologists, the ratio of public to private healthcare, and difficulties in recruiting certain clinics. This study highlights the importance of a nationwide registry when managing systemic pharmacotherapy of atopic dermatitis.

  • 2.
    Beckman, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Science, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Health Service Research, Management& Policy, University of Florida FL, USA.
    Hagquist, Curt
    Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Langan, Sinéad M.
    Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; Health Data Research UK, London, UK.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund; Centre for Clinical Research Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Relationship between Eczema and Self-reported Difficulties Keeping up with School Education: A Cross-sectional Study2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv5268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eczema is a common chronic disease that affects both children and adults, and may have an adverse impact on school performance, as it is characteristically pruritic, and hence may lead to poor concentration and inadequate sleep. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between eczema and self-reported difficulties keeping up with school education. The study was based on cross-sectional questionnaire data collected in schools among all 9th graders (15-16 years old) within a Swedish county. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between having eczema and self-reported difficulties keeping up with school education. A total of 2,620 pupils participated (50.1% female). An increased odds ratio (OR) of selfreported difficulties keeping up with school education was found in adolescents with eczema compared with those without eczema after adjustment for sex and family residence (OR 2.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.32-3.44), and with additional adjustment for sleeping problems, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, allergy, rhinitis, asthma, and alcohol consumption (adjusted OR 1.78, CI 1.05-3.00). Eczema may be a relevant risk factor for difficulty keeping up with school education in adolescents. However, studies that can assess temporality, based in different settings with objective reports of both eczema and self-reported difficulties at school, are needed to confirm these findings.

  • 3. Bingefors, Kerstin
    et al.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Isacson, Dag
    Quality of life, use of topical medications and socio-economic data in hand eczema: a Swedish nationwide survey2011In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 452-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand eczema is common and has an adverse impact on the lives of patients. There is a need for population-based surveys on the pharmacoepidemiological aspects, quality of life and impact of socioeconomic factors in hand eczema. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate these factors. A questionnaire-based nationwide survey of health was performed, including questions on hand eczema, use of pharmaceuticals and socioeconomic factors. Quality of life was estimated with the generic instrument Short Form 36 (SF-36). The questionnaire was sent to 7,985 persons (age range 18-84 years), response rate 61.1% (n=4,875). The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema in the study population was 7.5%. In this group, quality of life was lower. All dimensions of SF-36 were affected, most markedly general health and those dimensions reporting on mental health. In the group with self-reported hand eczema, 51% reported using topical pharmaceuticals. Hand eczema was more common among women (9.1%, n=2,630) than among men (5.6%, n=2,245) and in the age group below 65 years (8.5%, n=3,274) compared with those aged 65 years and over (4.3%, n=1,151). This survey clearly demonstrates the impact of hand eczema on several dimensions of life and also highlights age, gender and socioeconomic differences.

  • 4.
    Bingefors, Kristina
    et al.
    Farmaci, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Hudkliniken, Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isacson, Dag
    Farmaci, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Self-reported lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis and co-morbidity with asthma and eczema in adulthood: a population-based cross-sectional survey2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 438-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atopic dermatitis and its co-morbidity with asthma and allergy is well described in younger age groups. However, population-based studies on adults with atopic dermatitis in childhood are sparse. The aims of this study were to determine: (i) the prevalence of self-reported childhood atopic dermatitis in the population; and (ii) its association with present self-reported hand eczema, eczema, allergy, urticaria and asthma. A questionnaire was sent to a cross-sectional random sample of the Swedish population (n = 7,985), age range 18–84 years (response rate 61.1%). The questionnaire included the question “Have you had childhood eczema?” and questions on 5 other medical problems (hand eczema, other eczema, asthma, urticaria and allergy). Persons reporting eczema in childhood reported increased odds ratios (OR) for hand eczema (4.01), other eczema (3.88), urticaria (2.50), allergy (2.98), and asthma (2.06) as adults. The combination of eczema, allergy and asthma had an OR of 14.10 (95% confidence interval 8.44–23.54). Adults in the age range 18–84 years reporting childhood atopic dermatitis still have high co-morbidity with eczema, asthma, urticaria and allergy.

  • 5.
    Curman, Philip
    et al.
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermato-Venereology Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jebril, William
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermato-Venereology Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evans-Molina, Carmella
    Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Bachar-Wikstrom, Etty
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermato-Venereology Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martin, Cederlöf
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wikström, Jakob D.
    Dermatology and Venereology Division, Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermato-Venereology Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hailey-Hailey Disease is Associated with Diabetes: A Population-based Cohort Study, Clinical Cohort Study, and Pedigree Analysis2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv10436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hailey-Hailey disease is a rare hereditary skin disease caused by mutations in the ATP2C1 gene encoding the secretory pathway Ca2+/Mn2+-ATPase 1 (SPCA1) protein. Extracutaneous manifestations of Hailey-Hailey disease are plausible but still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the association between Hailey-Hailey disease and diabetes. A population-based cohort study of 347 individuals with Hailey-Hailey  disease was performed to assess the risks of type 1  diabetes and type 2 diabetes, using Swedish nationwide registries. Pedigrees from 2 Swedish families with Hailey-Hailey disease were also investigated: 1 with concurrent type 1 diabetes and HLA-DQ3, the other with type 2 diabetes. Lastly, a clinical cohort with 23 individuals with Hailey-Hailey disease and matched healthy controls was evaluated regarding diabetes. In the register data males with Hailey-Hailey disease had a 70% elevated risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas no  excess risk among women could be confirmed. In both pedigrees an unusually high inheritance for diabetes was observed. In the clinical cohort, individuals with Hailey-Hailey disease displayed a metabolic phenotype indicative of type 2 diabetes. Hailey-Hailey disease seems to act as a synergistic risk factor for diabetes. This study indicates, for the first time, an association between Hailey-Hailey disease and diabetes and represents human evidence that SPCA1 and the Golgi apparatus may be implicated in diabetes pathophysiology.

  • 6.
    Evenhamre, Karolina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Correlations Between Disease-specific DLQI and Generic WHOQOL-BREF Quality of Life Instruments in a Clinical Population with Mixed Dermatological Diagnoses: A Pilot Study2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 270-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hedberg, Yolanda S.
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lidén, Carola
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Chromium Dermatitis in a Metal Worker Due to Leather Gloves and Alkaline Coolant2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 104-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hilmarsdóttir, Ingibjörg
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Landspítali – The University Hospital of Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland.
    Arnardóttir, Eva Mjöll
    Department of Microbiology, Landspítali – The University Hospital of Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland.
    Jóhannesdóttir, Elisabet Reykdal
    Department of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Landspítali – The University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Golparian, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Chlamydia trachomatis in Iceland: Prevalence, Clinico-epidemiological Features and Comparison of Cobas 480 CT/NG and Aptima Combo 2 (CT/NG) for Diagnosis2021In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 101, article id adv00393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of, and risk factors for, Chlamydia trachomatis in attendees recruited prospectively from October 2018 to January 2019 at the only sexually transmitted infections clinic in Iceland (in Reykjavik), and to evaluate the cobas 4800 CT/NG Test and Aptima Combo 2 Assay for C. trachomatis detection in male urine and female vaginal swabs. Prevalence of C. trachomatis was 15.8% among 487 women and 13.6% among 491 men (no Neisseria gonorrhoeae positive patients were found). C. trachomatis detection was independently and positively associated with being tested for contact tracing, 18?24 years of age, and reporting ? 6 sexual partners within 12 months. Reporting sex with nonresidents of Iceland was associated with a lower risk of C. trachomatis infection. Both assays had a high sensitivity in detection of C. trachomatis (Aptima Combo 2: 100%; cobas 4800 CT/NG: 95.1%) and high specificity (100% and 99.6%, respectively). The high local prevalence of C. trachomatis and increased acquisition risk following sex with residents are of public health concern.

  • 9.
    Hjelmevoll, Stig Ove
    et al.
    Departments of Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Olsen, Merethe Elise
    Departments of Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sollid, Johanna U. Ericson
    Department of Microbiology and Virology, Institute of Medical Biology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Haaheim, Hakon
    Departments of Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Melby, Kjetil K.
    Department of Microbiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Moi, Harald
    Olafiaklinikken, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sverige; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skogen, Vegard
    Departments of Infectious Diseases, Medical Clinic, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Appropriate Time for Test-of-Cure when Diagnosing Gonorrhoea with a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test2012In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Culture is commonly regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have rapidly replaced culture for diagnostics in many settings. The aim of the present study was to investigate the appropriate time for test-of-cure (TOC) when NAATs are used for diagnosis of gonorrhoea. In total, 30 patients (28 men and 2 women) provided urethral, cervical, rectal or pharyngeal specimens for TOC. All included patients, except one who did not return for second TOC before day 19, tested negative within 2 weeks after treatment with cefixime 400 mg x 1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 68% of the culture-positive strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Thus, the recommended empirical treatment with ciprofloxacin in Norway should be changed immediately. TOC can be performed 2 weeks after treatment when NAATs are used for diagnosis of gonorrhoea.

  • 10.
    Howells, Laura
    et al.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Chalmers, Joanne R.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Gran, Sonia
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Ahmed, Amina
    Patient representative, Nottingham, UK.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Medical Sociology, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Regensburg; Institute of Social Medicine and Health Economics, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Burton, Tim
    Patient representative, Nottingham, UK.
    Howie, Lynita
    Patient representative, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lawton, Sandra
    Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust, Rotherham, UK.
    Ridd, Matthew J.
    Population Health Science, University of Bristol, UK.
    Rogers, Natasha K.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Sears, Alison V.
    St John’s Institute of Dermatology and Peter Gorer Department of Immunobiology, School of Immunology and Microbial Sciences, King’s College London, London, UK.
    Spuls, Phyllis I.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public health and Epidemiology, Immunity and Infections, the Netherlands.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Clinical Research, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Thomas, Kim S.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    RECAP OF ATOPIC ECZEMA (RECAP): ASSESSING ECZEMA CONTROL FROM THE PATIENT AND PARENT PERSPECTIVE2021In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 101, no Suppl. 221, p. 29-29, article id PE4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative recommend long-term control of eczema is measured in all clinical trials over 3 months in duration, but prior to this work, no instrument had been identified as suitable for inclusion in the core outcome set.

    Objective: To develop a ques-tionnaire to capture ‘eczema control’ from a patient/caregiver’s perspective.

    Methods: A mixed-methods approach was used to develop and refine a conceptual framework, generate, refine and select items and initial testing of the items. Questionnaire con-tent was generated and refined via a focus group, expert panel meetings, cognitive interviews and an online survey with people with eczema/caregivers. Impact analysis and multivariable li-near regression were used for item selection. The distribution of scores and construct validity were assessed.

    Results: Fourteen expert panel members (including patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals and methodologists) co-produced the instrument; with input from people with eczema/caregivers via a focus group (n = 6), cognitive interviews (n = 13) and an online survey (n = 330). Recap of atopic eczema (RECAP) is a seven-item questionnaire with a self-reported and caregiver-reported version. Initial testing suggested no floor or ceiling effects and good construct validity. Positive correlation with the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) was confirmed (r(258)=0.83, p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: RECAP is appropriate and feasible for measuring eczema control in clinical trials. Testing of measurement properties and translation to other languages is ongoing. RECAP has been recommended for inclusion in the HOME core outcome set for clinical trials and the HOME clinical practice set.

  • 11.
    Isaksson, Marlene
    et al.
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Brared-Christensson, Johanna
    Dept Dermatol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Matura, Mihaly
    Inst Environm Med, Dept Dermatol, Unit Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Dermatol, Ctr Occupat & Environm Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Halvor
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    Dept Dermatol, Uddevalla Cent Hosp, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Dept Dermatol, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Patch Testing with Formaldehyde 2.0% in Parallel with 1.0% by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 408-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a multicentre study consecutively patch-tested dermatitis patients were tested simultaneously with 1.0% and 2.0% (w/v) formaldehyde in aqua applied with a micro-pipette (15 mu l) to the filter paper disc in Finn Chambers (0.30 mg/cm(2) and 0.60 mg/cm(2), respectively). A total of 2,122 dermatitis patients were patch-tested. In all, 77 (3.6%) patients reacted positively to formaldehyde; 37 reacted only to 2.0%, 35 reacted to both concentrations and 5 patients reacted only to 1.0%. Significantly more patients were thus diagnosed with contact allergy to formaldehyde with 2.0% compared to 1.0% (p<0.001) without causing more irritant reactions. The detected number of isolated allergic reactions to the 2 formaldehyde-releasers in the Swedish baseline series and not to formaldehyde itself raises the question whether quaternium-15 1.0% and diazolidinyl urea 2.0% should be present in the Swedish baseline series.

  • 12.
    Jamil, Wasim
    et al.
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology.
    Incidence Rate of Hand Eczema in Different Occupations: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis2022In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 102, article id adv00681Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand eczema is a chronic disease that results in economic and psychosocial burdens. The aim of this study was to systematically review and assess the magnitude of the association between exposure related to occupations and the incidence rate of hand eczema. A systematic search in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases, from inception to September 2017, of full-text observational studies reporting incident cases of hand eczema during employment, and a supplementary search in PubMed to September 2020, were conducted. Among 2,417 screened abstracts, 15 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Incidence rates were reported per 100 person-years. Based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, 9 studies were good quality, 2 fair quality, and 4 poor quality. Hairdressers had a high incidence of hand eczema of 21.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.3-27.4), as did nurses, 16.9 (95% CI 11.2-22.7), and metal workers, 12.4 (95% CI 3.5-21.3). Hairdressers were predominantly women, and metal worker were predominantly men. Office occupations had an incidence rate of hand eczema of 4.9 (95% CI 1.2-9.6). The high risk of hand eczema for hairdressers, nurses, and metal workers, should be considered by healthcare policymakers. Even occupations with low irritant profile, such as office workers, were at risk of developing hand eczema, and more occupations should be investigated regarding the related risk of developing hand eczema.

  • 13.
    Jamil, Wasim
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, and Faculty of Medicine, Section of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Occupational Dermatology &Medical Science Lunds university Malmö, Sweden.
    Berg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Medical Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Department of Dermatology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Can Dermatology Life Quality Index be used as a Prognostic Tool for Predicting Need of Health Care in Eczema Patients? A Pilot Study2022In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 102, article id adv00673Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Josefson, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Färm, Gunilla
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Validation of self-testing as a method to estimate the prevalence of nickel allergy2011In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 526-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Valid epidemiological tools are required for surveillance of the prevalence of contact allergy. Population based studies including patch testing is the most reliable method, but implies heavy expenses and logistical problems. Clinical data are not representative for the general population and questionnaires concerning contact allergy have a low validity. Self-testing might be a useful method but it has to be validated and evaluated.

    Objectives: To investigate the validity of self-patch testing for nickel allergy. Methods: Patients from three dermatology clinics were included consecutively when referred to patch testing. In total, 191 patients participated and they were provided with a self-test package including written instructions. The self-test was applied on the arm by the patient, on the same day as the patch test was applied on the back, in the clinic. The patient evaluated the self-test before the patch test reading at the clinic.

    Results: Patch test at dermatology clinic (‘gold standard’) gave 46/191 (24%) nickel-positive individuals. The sensitivity of the self-test was 72% (95% CI 57–84), the specificity was 91% (95% CI 85–95) and the proportion of agreement was 86% (95% CI 81–91).Conclusions: The validity of self-testing for nickel allergy was adequate in the studied population. To determine whether self-testing is a useful tool for measuring the prevalence of nickel allergy in the general population further studies will be needed.

  • 15.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    A New Perspective on the Formation of Stratum Corneum Intercellular Space2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 291-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    is missing (In this Issue...).

  • 16.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Have you measured the patient's quimp?2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 425-425Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; IMM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berg, Mats
    Department of Dermatology Sörmland, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, FoU Centre Sörmland, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Some observations on reporting quality of life in treatment of psoriasis in outpatient clinics2012In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 210-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berg, Mats
    Department of Dermatology Sörmland, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Some observations on reporting quality of life in treatment of psoriasis in outpatients clinics2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 210-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Isacson, Dag
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bingefors, Kerstin
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Self-reported Skin Diseases, Quality of Life and Medication Use: A Nationwide Pharmaco-epidemiological Survey in Sweden2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 188-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine self-reported consumption of dermatological pharmaceuticals and quality of life (QoL), measured with Short Form 36, in relation to eczema, acne, psoriasis and other inflammatory skin conditions in the Swedish population. A questionnaire containing questions on the occurrence of skin diseases, health-related QoL and the use of pharmaceuticals was sent to a cross-sectional sample of the Swedish population, age range 18-84 years (n =8,000). The response rate was 61%. The 1-year prevalence of skin diseases was 30-35%, with females reporting a higher prevalence. The prevalence was 11.5% for eczema other than hand eczema, 10.2% for acne, 7.5% for hand eczema, 3.9% for psoriasis and 3.1% for urticaria. QoL was significantly affected and 25% of females and 19% of males had used a dermatological drug. Compared with hand eczema, persons with psoriasis and other eczema reported significantly more use of topical steroids on prescription and more use of dermatological pharmaceuticals in total. Skin conditions are common; they affect QoL and lead to a high consumption of dermatological drugs; which deserves increased awareness in the society.

  • 20.
    Lysell, Josefin
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm.
    Linde, Annika
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Göran
    Childhood Cancer Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmros-Svennilson, Johan
    Childhood Cancer Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westermark, Anders
    Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Andersson, Jan
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm.
    Antiviral therapy in children with hydroa vacciniforme2009In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 89, no 4, p. 393-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydroa vacciniforme is a rare, usually quite severe, photo-dermatosis. Association with Epstein-Barr virus infection and a possibly increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy have been demonstrated. We describe here four patients with Epstein-Barr virus-associated hydroa vacciniforme treated with acyclovir/valacyclovir therapy with a good clinical response. The children were reported to have less fatigue, fewer eruptions, less scarring, and increased ability to spend time outdoors without provoking new eruptions. This was also in agreement with clinical observations. However, one patient progressed into an anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in the upper jaw. This was preceded by an increase in EBV viral load. Acyclovir/valacyclovir therapy is a safe treatment. Further studies are required to confirm these results.

  • 21.
    Mowitz, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fornander, Louise
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology and Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hosseiny, Sara
    Department of Dermatology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    Department of Dermatology, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Patch Testing with Isobornyl Acrylate in 16 Swedish Patients with Contact Dermatitis from Glucose Sensors and/or Insulin Pumps2019In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 99, no 13, p. 1286-1287Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Norstedt, Sofia
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dietary regimes for treatment of acne vulgaris: A critical review of published clinical trials2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 283-284Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Pellrud, Helena
    et al.
    STD Clinic, Department of Dermatovenereology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Golparian, Daniel
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Christian Steezko
    STD Clinic, Department of Dermatovenereology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Falk, My
    STD Clinic, Department of Dermatovenereology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Trichomonas vaginalis Infections are Rare Among Young Patients Attending an STI Clinic in Sweden2015In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 95, no 3, p. 343-344Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Peltonen, Sirkku
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahlquist, Anders
    University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Larkö, Olle
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Obituary: Annamari Ranki2024In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 104, article id adv40151Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ratusznik, Natalia
    et al.
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Edslev, Sofie Marie
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites & Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stegger, Marc
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Bacteria, Parasites & Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark; Antimicrobial Resistance and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Harry Butler Institute, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Superantigen Encoding Genes in Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Lesional Skin, Non-Lesional Skin, and Nares of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis2024In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 104, article id adv34882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are more likely than healthy individuals to harbour Staphylococcus aureus on their skin. Superantigens (SAgs) produced by specific S. aureus strains may contribute to AD-associated skin inflammation. The present study compared the prevalence and types of SAg-encoding genes between S. aureus isolated from patients with AD and from  controls, and within the AD group between isolates from different sampling sites (lesional skin, non-lesional skin, and nares). This retrospective case-control study extracted data from 2 previous studies that examined S. aureus using whole-genome sequencing. The 138 S. aureus isolates obtained from 71 AD patients contained 349 SAg-encoding genes; 22 (6.3%) were found in isolates from nares (0.4 ± 0.6 genes per isolate), 99 (28.4%) in isolates from non-lesional skin (3.7 ± 3.9), and 228 (65.3%) in isolates from lesional skin (4.2 ± 4.5). S. aureus (n = 101) from the control group contained 594 SAg-encoding genes (5.9 ± 4.2). Of the S. aureus isolated from lesional AD skin, 69% carried at least 1 gene encoding SAg compared with 33% of AD nasal isolates. SAg could be a factor in the pathogenesis of a subset of AD patients.

  • 26.
    Rehnström, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Dermato-Venereology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tunbäck, Petra
    Department of Dermato-Venereology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gonococcal Osteomyelitis Resulting in Permanent Sequelae2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 562-563Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    et al.
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden; Dept Dermatol, Uddevalla Cent Hosp, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Brared-Christensson, Johanna
    Dept Dermatol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marlene
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Matura, Mihaly
    Inst Environm Med, Unit Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Dermatol & Venereol, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Patch Testing with a Textile Dye Mix in Two Concentrations: A Multicentre Study by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group2015In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 427-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disperse dyes, which are used for colouring synthetic textile fibres, are well-known contact sensitisers. To investigate the outcome of patch-testing with a textile dye mix (TDM) at 7 dermatology clinics in Sweden, a TDM tested at 2 concentrations was included into the baseline series during one year. The mix consisted of Disperse (D) Blue 35, D Yellow 3, D Orange 1 and 3, D Red 1 and 17, all 1.0%, and D Blue 106 and D Blue 124, each 0.3% in the mix 6.6% and 1.0% each in the mix 8.0%. In 2,122 tested patients, contact allergy to the TDM at the concentration 8.0% was found in 2.8% and to the TDM at 6.6% in 2.5% of the patients. The contact allergy to the TDM could explain or contribute to the dermatitis in about 35% of the patients.

    Conclusion: contact allergy to the TDM is common and inclusion into the Swedish baseline series should be considered.

  • 28.
    Sadeghi, Sara
    et al.
    Alberta Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden; Centrum for Clinical Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ramien, Michele
    Division of Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada; Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary Alberta, Canada.
    A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF ELECTRONIC HEALTH TOOLS FOR ATOPIC DERMATITIS2022In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 102, no Suppl. 223, p. 54-54, article id P8.04Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) education empowers patients and their caregivers with knowledge and is critical to successful management. AD education is often delivered by health care providers to individual patients/families or to groups but barriers to access leave some AD sufferers without this critical component of AD management. Electronic health (e-Health) tools for AD could bridge this gap. 1. Identify current e-Health tools for AD; 2. For each e-Health tool, summarize and assess: a. Objective/purpose, b. Informational content, c. Effect on knowledge about AD, d. Validity, and e. Delivery and feasibility. A systematic review has been performed to evaluate all available E-health tools for children with AD, parents of the children with AD, adults with AD, and health care professionals working in the related fields using Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar. Data collection elements include e-Health tool features (platform, purpose, content, delivery) and target audience factors (AD disease course, type and duration of treatment, severity, quality of life impact). We will assess the validity, feasibility, and effect on knowledge about AD for each tool. Results will be stratified by the target audience. Data analysis is ongoing and will be presented. By identifying gaps that exist in the content of currently available e-Health tools, future work can address the identified unmet needs.

  • 29.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology in Östergötland, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Alsterholm, Mikael
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Chris D.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology in Östergötland, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bradley, Maria
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström Falk, MariHelen
    Vasakliniken Dermatology Clinic, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Andreas
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Theodosiou, Grigorios
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Vrang, Sophie
    Patients' organisation Atopikerna, The Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Cross-Cultural Validation of the RECAP of Atopic Eczema Question-naire in a Swedish Population2024In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 104, article id adv38889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Swedish translation of the patient-reported outcome measure for assessing long-term control of atopic dermatitis, Recap of atopic eczema (RECAP), has not been validated. Cross-cultural translation and multi-centre validation of the translated RECAP questionnaire were therefore performed. Disease severity was assessed using the validated Investigator Global Assessment Scale for atopic dermatitis (vIGA-ADTM). The Swedish RECAP was completed by 208 individuals aged 16 years or older with a median age of 36 years (interquartile range [IQR] 27-48). The participants considered the questionnaire suitable for assessing eczema control. The median RECAP score (range 0-28) was 12 (IQR 5-19). The mean and median vIGA-ADTM scores (range 0-4) were 2 (standard deviation [SD] 2) and 3 (IQR 2-4), respectively. A correlation between RECAP and the vIGA-ADTM was observed (p < 0.001). There was no significant change in scores for participants who answered the questionnaire twice within 14 days. Over time, improved or worsened eczema, as evaluat-ed by vIGA-ADTM, affected RECAP scores significantly (p < 0.001). The study suggests that RECAP can assess AD control in a Swedish clinical setting and shows -acceptable reliability.

  • 30.
    Theodosiou, Grigorios
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Clinical Epidemiology Division, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College, London, UK.
    Metsini, Alexandra
    Department of Planning and Economics, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; HTA-Unit CAMTÖ, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Sweden.
    Dalgard, Florence J.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Örebro, Faculty of Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in Swedish Adults: A Population-based Study2019In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 99, no 11, p. 964-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The burden of atopic dermatitis (AD) was assessed. A population-based, cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed among 34,313 Swedish adults in 2017. The prevalence of AD was 14%. Adults with mild AD had an increased relative risk ratio (RRR) of severe depression (aRRR 1.78, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.50-2.12) and anxiety (aRRR 1.97, 95% CI 1.69-2.30), which was higher for severe AD (aRRR 6.22 95% CI 4.60-8.42, aRRR 5.62 95% CI 4.10-7.71, respectively). Persons with severe AD were less likely to have a university degree (aRRR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34-0.90) and more likely to have a lower annual income (238,000-324,000 SEK: aRRR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39-0.77; 325,000 SEK or more 0.36; 0.25-0.58) compared with individuals without AD. These results suggest that AD implies an increased prevalence of comorbid mental conditions and an adverse impact on academic achievement and work. These adverse associations increase substantially for patients with severe AD and comorbid asthma.

  • 31.
    Theodosiou, Grigorios
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nissen, Theresa
    Department of Dermatology-Venereology-Allergology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
    Weisshaar, Elke
    Occupational Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Plachta-Danielzik, Sandra
    Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian-Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany.
    Augustin, Matthias
    Department of Dermatology-Venereology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
    Ständer, Sonja
    Department of Dermatology, Center for Chronic Pruritus, University Hospital Münster of the Westphalian Wilhelms-University, Münster, Germany.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Malmö.
    Fölster-Holst, Regina
    Department of Dermatology-Venereology-Allergology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
    Prevalence of Itch in German Schoolchildren: A Population-based Study2022In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 102, article id adv00718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Itch is a common symptom, but there is limited evidence on the prevalence of itch in children. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of itch in schoolchildren. A questionnaire was developed by experts in the field and based on a literature search. The questionnaire was applied in a pilot study of 25 consecutively selected paediatric patients and their parents. It confirmed the high content validity of the questionnaire, and the questionnaire was comparable to hospital records regarding chronic itch (n = 19, mean consistency 89.47%). The questionnaire was distributed among German schoolchildren in 9/12 randomly selected primary schools in Kiel, Germany. Of 1,722 invited students, 443 schoolchildren aged 6-10 years participated, and 26.2% (n = 116) reported itch. The prevalence of acute itch was 20.0% (n = 87), and 14.7% (n = 65) reported chronic itch. Reduced sleep and mood were often related to chronic itch. This study demonstrated that itch is a common symptom in German schoolchildren.

  • 32.
    Unemo, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Ctr Gonorrhoea & Other STIs, Natl Reference Lab Pathogen Neisseria, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Endre, Kim M. A.
    Inst Clin Med, Olafia Clin, Oslo Univ Hosp, Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Moi, Harald
    Inst Clin Med, Olafia Clin, Oslo Univ Hosp, Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Five-day Azithromycin Treatment Regimen for Mycoplasma genitalium Infection Also Effectively Eradicates Chlamydia trachomatis2015In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 95, no 6, p. 730-732Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hedblad, Mari-Anne
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Long-term follow-up of photodynamic therapy for mycosis fungoides2008In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 288-290Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Porwit, A.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ros, A. M.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Photodynamic therapy with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid for mycosis fungoides: clinical and histological response2001In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 184-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no curative treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of single lesions to photodynamic therapy (PDT). The study included 10 plaque MF lesions and 2 tumour MF lesions from 10 patients. First, 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid was applied topically to the lesion and adjacent skin for 5-6 h. The lesion was then exposed to red light at around 630nm. Skin biopsies were taken before treatment, after clinical improvement and after clinical remission. The expression of CD3, CD4, CD7, CD8, CD1a, CD34, CD68, CD71, Ki-67, bcl-2 and p53 was studied immunohistochemically. There was complete clinical clearance in seven of nine plaque lesions. Neither tumour lesion responded to PDT. The biopsies confirmed a regression of the infiltrate after treatment. In the sparse remaining infiltrate a few CD4+ and CD8+ cells were found, most of which showed normal bcl-2. There were also fewer proliferating cells, illustrated by a decrease in Ki-67 and CD71. In conclusion, PDT has good clinical and histological effects in treating local plaque MF lesions.

1 - 34 of 34
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