oru.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 20 of 20
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1. Birkeland, Kare I.
    et al.
    Home, Philip D.
    Wendisch, Ulrich
    Ratner, Robert E.
    Johansen, Thue
    Endahl, Lars A.
    Lyby, Karsten
    Jendle, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Roberts, Anthony P.
    DeVries, J. Hans
    Meneghini, Luigi F.
    Insulin degludec in type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial of a new-generation ultra-long-acting insulin compared with insulin glargine2011Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 34, nr 3, s. 661-665Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a basal insulin that forms soluble multihexamers after subcutaneous injection, resulting in an ultra-long action profile. We assessed the efficacy and safety of IDeg formulations administered once daily in combination with mealtime insulin aspart in people with type 1 diabetes.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In this 16-week, randomized, open-label trial, participants (mean: 45.8 years old, A1C 8.4%, fasting plasma glucose [FPG] 9.9 mmol/L, BMI 26.9 kg/m(2)) received subcutaneous injections of IDeg(A) (600 mu mol/L; n = 59), IDeg(B) (900 mu mol/L; n = 60), or insulin glargine (IGlar; n = 59), all given once daily in the evening. Insulin aspart was administered at mealtimes.

    RESULTS: At 16 weeks, mean A1C was comparable for IDeg(A) (7.8 +/- 0.8%), IDeg(B) (8.0 +/- 1.0%), and IGlar (7.6 +/- 0.8%), as was FPG (8.3 +/- 4.0, 8.3 +/- 2.8, and 8.9 +/- 3.5 mmol/L, respectively). Estimated mean rates of confirmed hypoglycemia were 28% lower for IDeg(A) compared with IGlar (rate ratio [RR]: 0.72 [95% CI 0.52-1.00]) and 10% lower for IDeg(B) compared with IGlar (RR: 0.90 [0.65-1.24]); rates of nocturnal hypoglycemia were 58% lower for IDeg(A) (RR: 0.42 [0.25-0.69]) and 29% lower for IDeg(B) (RR: 0.71 [0.44-1.16]). Mean total daily insulin dose was similar to baseline. The frequency and pattern of adverse events was similar between insulin treatments.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this clinical exploratory phase 2 trial in people with type 1 diabetes, IDeg is safe and well tolerated and provides comparable glycemic control to IGlar at similar doses, with reduced rates of hypoglycemia.

  • 2.
    Himmelmann, Anders
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jendle, Johan
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mellén, Anders
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petersen, Astrid H.
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dahl, Ulf L.
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wollmer, Per
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The impact of smoking on inhaled insulin2003Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 26, nr 3, s. 677-682Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study, one of the first to address issues of pulmonary insulin delivery in smokers, compared pharmacokinetics of inhaled insulin delivered via the AERx insulin Diabetes Management System (iDMS) in nondiabetic cigarette smokers and nonsmokers.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In this randomized two-period crossover efficacy and safety trial in 27 nondiabetic smokers and 16 nonsmokers (18 men/25 women, mean age 28 years, mean BMI 23.0 kg/m(2)), subjects received single doses of inhaled insulin (33.8 IU) following overnight fasting on consecutive dosing days. On one dosing day, smokers smoked three cigarettes immediately before insulin administration ("acute smoking"); on the other dosing day, smokers had not smoked since midnight ("nonacute smoking"). After inhalation, 6-h serum insulin and serum glucose profiles were determined.

    RESULTS: Pharmacokinetic results for evaluable subjects were derived from serum insulin profiles. The amount of insulin absorbed during the first 6 h after dosing (area under the exogenous serum insulin curve from 0 to 6 h [AUC((0-6 h))]) was significantly greater in smokers (63.2 vs. 40.0 mU l(-1) x h(-1), P = 0.0017); peak concentration was both higher and earlier in the smokers (maximal serum concentration of insulin [C(max)] 42.0 vs. 13.9 mU/l, P < 0.0001; time to maximal serum concentration of insulin [t(max)] 31.5 vs. 53.9 min, P = 0.0003). The estimated intrasubject variability of AUC((0-6 h)) was 13.7 and 16.5% for nonsmokers and smokers, respectively. No safety issues arose.

    CONCLUSIONS: Absorption of inhaled insulin via the AERx iDMS was significantly greater in smokers, with a higher AUC((0-6 h)) and C(max) and a shorter t(max). Intrasubject variability of AUC((0-6 h)) was low and similar in nonsmokers and smokers. These data prompt more extensive investigation of inhaled insulin in diabetic smokers.

  • 3.
    Hjern, Anders
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Karolinska Institute Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderström, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Pediatrics, Mälarsjukhuset, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Åman, Jan
    Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    East africans in Sweden have a high risk for type 1 diabetes2012Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 35, nr 3, s. 597-598Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Citing this article BMJ Open October 31, 2013 3:e003418

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of type 1 diabetes in children with an origin inSub-Saharan Africa in Sweden.

    Research design and methods: Nationwide register study based on retrievedprescriptions of insulin during 2009 in children aged 0–18 years. The study population consistedof 35,756 children in families with an origin in Sub-Saharan Africa and 1,666,051 children withnative Swedish parents.

    Results: The odds ratio (OR) for insulin medication in Swedish-born children in familiesoriginating in East Africa was 1.29 (95% CI 1.02–1.63) compared with offspring of nativeSwedish parents, after adjustment for age and sex, and less common in children who themselveswere born in East Africa: 0.50 (0.34–0.73). Offspring of parents from other parts of Sub-SaharanAfrica had a comparatively low risk for insulin medication.

    Conclusions: This study indicates that Swedish-born children with an origin in EastAfrica have a high risk of type 1 diabetes.

  • 4.
    Jansson, Stefan P.O.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin. Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Family Med & Clin Epidemiol Sect, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Dan K.G.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Family Med & Clin Epidemiol Sect, Uppsala, Sweden; Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Div Reg Supervis Author, Orebro, Sweden.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Family Med & Clin Epidemiol Sect, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mortality trends in subjects with and without diabetes during 33 years of follow up2009Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 33, nr 3, s. 551-556Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Mortality rates have declined substantially over the past decades in the general population, but the situation among diabetic subjects is less clear. The aim of this study was to analyze mortality trends in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects during 1972–2004.

    Research design and methods: Since 1972, all patients with diabetes are entered in a diabetes register at Laxå Primary Health Care Center; 776 incident cases were recorded up to 2001. The register has been supplemented with a nondiabetic population of 3,880 subjects and with data from the National Cause of Death Register during 1972 to 2004.

    Results: During the 33-year follow-up period, 233 (62.0%) diabetic women and 240 (60.0%) diabetic men and 995 (52.9%) nondiabetic women and 1,082 (54.1%) nondiabetic men died. The age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality among diabetic and nondiabetic subjects was 1.17 (P < 0.0021) for all, 1.22 (P < 0.007) for women, and 1.13 (P = 0.095) for men. The corresponding cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality HRs were 1.33 (P < 0.0001), 1.41 (P < 0.0003), and 1.27 (P < 0.0093), respectively. The CVD mortality reduction across time was significant in nondiabetic subjects (P < 0.0001) and in men with diabetes (P = 0.014) but not in diabetic women (P = 0.69). The results regarding coronary heart disease (CHD) were similar (P < 0.0001, P < 0.006, and P = 0.17, respectively). The CVD and CHD mortality rate change across time was fairly linear in all groups.

    Conclusions: Diabetic subjects had less mortality rate reduction during follow-up than nondiabetic subjects. However the excess mortality risk for diabetic subjects was smaller than that found in other studies.

  • 5.
    Kurien, Matthew
    et al.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, U.K.; Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, U.K..
    Mollazadegan, Kaziwe
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sanders, David S.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, U.K.; Academic Unit of Gastroenterology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, U.K.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Celiac Disease Increases Risk of Thyroid Disease in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: A Nationwide Cohort Study2016Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 39, nr 3, s. 371-375Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD) have been linked to autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD). We examined if individuals with both T1D and CD were at a higher risk of ATD than those with only T1D.

    Research design and methods: This study was a nationwide population-based cohort study. We defined T1D as having an inpatient or a hospital-based outpatient diagnosis of T1D at age ≤30 years in the Swedish National Patient Register between 1964 and 2009. Data on CD were obtained through small intestinal biopsy reports showing villous atrophy (Marsh histopathology grade III) between 1969 and 2008 at any of the 28 pathology departments in Sweden. ATD included hyperthyreosis and hypothyreosis, defined according to the Swedish National Patient Register. We identified 947 individuals with T1D and biopsy-verified CD. These were matched to 4,584 control subjects with T1D but no CD diagnosis. Cox regression then estimated the risk of ATD.

    Results: Among T1D, CD was a risk factor for later ATD. During follow-up, 90 T1D+CD patients developed ATD (expected n = 54). Adjusting for sex, age, and calendar period, this corresponded to a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.67 (95% CI 1.32-2.11; P < 0.001). This excess risk was highest in those who had CD for 10 years or more (HR 2.22 [95% CI 1.49-3.23]). Risk increases were seen in both males and females. CD was a risk factor for both hypothyreosis (HR 1.66 [95% CI 1.30-2.12]) and hyperthyreosis (HR 1.72 [95% CI 0.95-3.11]).

    Conclusions: Among patients with T1D, CD is a risk factor for the later development of ATD.

  • 6. Lee, Duk-Hee
    et al.
    Lind, P. Monica
    Jacobs, David R., Jr.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Lind, Lars
    Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Organochlorine Pesticides in Plasma Predict Development of Type 2 Diabetes in the Elderly2011Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 34, nr 8, s. 1778-1784Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), lipophilic chemicals that accumulate mainly in adipose tissue, have recently been linked to type 2 diabetes. However, evidence from prospective studies is sparse. This study was performed to evaluate prospective associations of type 2 diabetes with selected POPs among the elderly. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Nineteen POPs (14 polychlorinated biphenyl [PCB] congeners, 3 organochlorine pesticides, 1 brominated diphenyl ether, and 1 dioxin) were measured in plasma collected at baseline in 725 participants, aged 70 years, of the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS). RESULTS-After adjusting for known type 2 diabetes risk factors, including obesity, odds ratios (ORs) (95% CIs) for type 2 diabetes at age 75 years (n = 36) according to the quintiles of a summary measure of concentrations of PCBs (vs. the lowest quintile) were 4.5, 5.1, 8.8 (1.8-42.7), and 7.5 (1.4-38.8) (P(trend) <0.01). Among organochlorine pesticides, adjusted ORs across concentrations of trans-nonachlor showed that P(trend) = 0.03. Adjusted ORs (95% CIs) across quintiles of the sum of three organochlorine pesticides were 1.1, 1.6, 1.5, and 3.4 (1.0-11.7) (P(trend) = 0.03). Neither brominated diphenyl ether 47 nor dioxin was significantly associated with incident diabetes. The sum of PCBs improved reclassification significantly when added to traditional risk factors for diabetes. CONCLUSIONS-Despite the small number of incident cases, this study found that environmental exposure to some POPs substantially increased risk of future type 2 diabetes in an elderly population.

  • 7.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Ekbom, Anders
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Celiac disease and risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes: a general population cohort study of children and adolescents2006Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 29, nr 11, s. 2483-2488Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Earlier studies suggest that children with type 1 diabetes are more likely to have a subsequent diagnosis of celiac disease. However, research is sparse on the risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes in individuals with celiac disease. We sought to determine the risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes diagnosed before the age of 20 years in children and adolescents with celiac disease in a national, general population-based cohort.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

    We identified 9,243 children with a diagnosis of celiac disease in the Swedish national inpatient register between 1964 and 2003. We then identified five reference individuals matched at time of diagnosis for age, calendar year, sex, and county (n = 45,680). Only individuals with >1 year of follow-up after study entry (diagnosis of celiac disease) were included in the analyses.

    RESULTS:

    Celiac disease was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes before age 20 years (hazard ratio 2.4 [95% CI 1.9-3.0], P < 0.001). This risk increase was seen regardless of whether celiac disease was first diagnosed between 0 and 2 (2.2 [1.7-2.9], P < 0.001) or 3 and 20 (3.4 [1.9-6.1], P < 0.001) years of age. Individuals with prior celiac disease were also at increased risk of ketoacidosis or diabetic coma before the age of 20 years (2.3 [1.4-3.9], P = 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Children with celiac disease are at increased risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes. This risk increase is low considering that 95% of individuals with celiac disease are HLA-DQ2 positive.

  • 8.
    Luukkonen, Panu K.
    et al.
    Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Sädevirta, Sanja
    Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Zhou, You
    Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki, Finland; Systems Immunity University Research Institute and Division of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Kayser, Brandon
    Nutriomics Team, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Sorbonne Universités INSERM UMRS 1166, Paris, France.
    Ali, Ashfaq
    Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Ahonen, Linda
    Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Lallukka, Susanna
    Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pelloux, Véronique
    Nutriomics Team, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Sorbonne Universités INSERM, UMRS 1166, Paris, France.
    Gaggini, Melania
    Institute of Clinical Physiology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa, Italy.
    Jian, Ching
    Immunobiology Research Program, Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hakkarainen, Antti
    Helsinki Medical Imaging Centre, Radiology, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lundbom, Nina
    Helsinki Medical Imaging Centre, Radiology, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Gylling, Helena
    Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Salonen, Anne
    Immunobiology Research Program, Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark; Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik. Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rissanen, Aila
    Obesity Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Gastaldelli, Amalia
    Institute of Clinical Physiology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa, Italy.
    Clément, Karine
    Nutriomics Team, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Sorbonne Universités INSERM, UMRS 1166, Paris, France; Nutrition Department, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.
    Hodson, Leanne
    Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.
    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele
    Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Saturated Fat Is More Metabolically Harmful for the Human Liver Than Unsaturated Fat or Simple Sugars2018Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 41, nr 8, s. 1732-1739Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (i.e., increased intrahepatic triglyceride [IHTG] content), predisposes to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Adipose tissue lipolysis and hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) are the main pathways contributing to IHTG. We hypothesized that dietary macronutrient composition influences the pathways, mediators, and magnitude of weight gain-induced changes in IHTG.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: O) basally and during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, endotoxemia, plasma ceramides, and adipose tissue gene expression at 0 and 3 weeks.

    RESULTS: < 0.05). CARB increased IHTG (+33%) by stimulating DNL (+98%). SAT significantly increased while UNSAT decreased lipolysis. SAT induced insulin resistance and endotoxemia and significantly increased multiple plasma ceramides. The diets had distinct effects on adipose tissue gene expression.

    CONCLUSIONS: Macronutrient composition of excess energy influences pathways of IHTG: CARB increases DNL, while SAT increases and UNSAT decreases lipolysis. SAT induced greatest increase in IHTG, insulin resistance, and harmful ceramides. Decreased intakes of SAT could be beneficial in reducing IHTG and the associated risk of diabetes.

  • 9.
    Mollazadegan, Kaziwe
    et al.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kugelberg, Maria
    St Erik Eye Hospital, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott M
    Region Örebro län. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Örebro University Hosptial, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sanders, David S.
    Gastroenterol & Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, England; University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Dept Clinical & Experimental Medicine, Div Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Pediatrics Clinic, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Region Örebro län. Dept Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A population-based study of the risk of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes and celiac disease2013Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, nr 2, s. 316-321Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Celiac disease (CD) is associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). In the current study, we examined whether CD affects the risk of diabetic retinopathy (DRP) in patients with T1D.

    Research design and methods: This was a population-based cohort study. Through the Swedish National Patient Register, we identified 41,566 patients diagnosed with diabetes in 1964-2009 and who were ≤30 years of age at diagnosis. CD was defined as having villous atrophy (Marsh stage 3) according to small intestinal biopsies performed between 1969 and 2008, with biopsy reports obtained from Sweden's 28 pathology departments. During follow-up, 947 T1D patients had a diagnosis of CD. We used Cox regression analysis with CD as a time-dependent covariate to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for DRP in patients with T1D and CD and compared them with patients with T1D but no CD.

    Results: Duration of CD correlated with the risk of DRP. When results were stratified by time since CD diagnosis, individuals with T1D and CD were at a lower risk of DRP in the first 5 years after CD diagnosis (aHR 0.57 [95% CI 0.36-0.91]), followed by a neutral risk in years 5 to <10 (1.03 [0.68-1.57]). With longer follow-up, coexisting CD was a risk factor for DRP (10 to <15 years of follow-up, aHR 2.83 [95% CI 1.95-4.11]; ≥15 years of follow-up, 3.01 [1.43-6.32]). CONCLUSIONS Having a diagnosis of CD for >10 years is a risk factor for the development of DRP in T1D. Long-standing CD in patients with T1D merits intense monitoring of DRP.

  • 10. Mortensen, Henrik B.
    et al.
    Hougaard, Philip
    Swift, Peter
    Hansen, Lars
    Holl, Reinhard W.
    Hoey, Hilary
    Bjoerndalen, Hilde
    de Beaufort, Carine
    Chiarelli, Francesco
    Danne, Thomas
    Schoenle, Eugen J.
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    New definition for the partial remission period in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes2009Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 32, nr 8, s. 1384-1390Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To find a simple definition of partial remission in type 1 diabetes that reflects both residual beta-cell function and efficacy of insulin treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 275 patients aged <16 years were followed from onset of type 1 diabetes. After 1, 6, and 12 months, stimulated C-peptide during a challenge was used as a measure of residual beta-cell function. RESULTS By multiple regression analysis, a negative association between stimulated C-peptide and A1C (regression coefficient -0.21, P < 0.001) and insulin dose (-0.94, P < 0.001) was shown. These results suggested the definition of an insulin dose-adjusted A1C (IDAA1C) as A1C (percent) + [4 x insulin dose (units per kilogram per 24 h)]. A calculated IDAA1C < or =9 corresponding to a predicted stimulated C-peptide >300 pmol/l was used to define partial remission. The IDAA1C < or =9 had a significantly higher agreement (P < 0.001) with residual beta-cell function than use of a definition of A1C < or =7.5%. Between 6 and 12 months after diagnosis, for IDAA1C < or =9 only 1 patient entered partial remission and 61 patients ended partial remission, for A1C < or =7.5% 15 patients entered partial remission and 53 ended, for a definition of insulin dose < or =0.5 units . kg(-1) . 24 h(-1) 5 patients entered partial remission and 66 ended, and for stimulated C-peptide (>300 pmol/l) 9 patients entered partial remission and 49 ended. IDAA1C at 6 months has good predictive power for stimulated C-peptide concentrations after both 6 and 12 months. CONCLUSIONS A new definition of partial remission is proposed, including both glycemic control and insulin dose. It reflects residual beta-cell function and has better stability compared with the conventional definitions.

  • 11.
    Nyström, Thomas
    et al.
    Division of Endocrinology, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    James, Stefan K.
    Cardiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Cardiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östlund, Ollie
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Cardiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mellbin, Linda
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Heart and Vascular Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences and Department of Cardiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Cardiology.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Cardiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hofmann, Robin
    Division of Cardiology, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oxygen Therapy in Myocardial Infarction Patients With or Without Diabetes: A Predefined Subgroup Analysis From the DETO2X-AMI Trial2019Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 42, nr 11, s. 2032-2041Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of oxygen therapy in myocardial infarction (MI) patients with and without diabetes.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In the Determination of the Role of Oxygen in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction (DETO2X-AMI) trial, 6,629 normoxemic patients with suspected MI were randomized to oxygen at 6 L/min for 6-12 h or ambient air. In this prespecified analysis involving 5,010 patients with confirmed MI, 934 had known diabetes. Oxidative stress may be of particular importance in diabetes, and the primary objective was to study the effect of supplemental oxygen on the composite of all-cause death and rehospitalization with MI or heart failure (HF) at 1 year in patients with and without diabetes.

    RESULTS: = 0.81). There was no statistically significant difference for the individual components of the composite end point or the rate of cardiovascular death up to 1 year. Likewise, corresponding end points in patients without diabetes were similar between the treatment groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite markedly higher event rates in patients with MI and diabetes, oxygen therapy did not significantly affect 1-year all-cause death, cardiovascular death, or rehospitalization with MI or HF, irrespective of underlying diabetes, in line with the results of the entire study.

  • 12. Olsson, Gunilla M.
    et al.
    Hulting, Anna-Lena
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Cognitive function in children and subsequent type 2 diabetes2008Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 31, nr 3, s. 514-516Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by age 42 years is associated with prior cognitive deficits in childhood.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Logistic regression estimated type 2 diabetes risk among 9,113 members of the 1958 British birth cohort of the National Child Development Study (NCDS). Associations with type 2 diabetes were estimated for general ability and reading comprehension assessments at age 11 years, modeled using SD units. Adjustment was for markers of early-life exposures, social and material family characteristics, sex, and disability, with further adjustment for BMI at age 7 years.

    RESULTS: Adjusted odds ratios (95% CIs) for type 2 diabetes (n = 69) are 0.67 (0.51-0.87) for general ability and 0.58 (0.44-0.77) for reading comprehension. Neither additional adjustment for BMI, nor limiting the definition of type 2 diabetes to onset after age 33 years altered the associations substantially.

    CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cognitive function may precede clinical onset of type 2 diabetes.

  • 13.
    Persson, Martina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fadl, Helena
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Hanson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pasupathy, Dharmintra
    Kings College London, London, England.
    Disproportionate Body Composition and Neonatal Outcome in Offspring of Mothers With and Without Gestational Diabetes Mellitus2013Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, nr 11, s. 3543-3548Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE High birth weight is a risk factor for neonatal complications. It is not known if the risk differs with body proportionality. The primary aim of this study was to determine the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in relation to body proportionality in large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants stratified by maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSPopulation-based study of all LGA (birth weight [BW] >90th percentile) infants born to women with GDM (n = 1,547) in 1998-2007. The reference group comprised LGA infants (n = 83,493) born to mothers without diabetes. Data were obtained from the Swedish Birth Registry. Infants were categorized as proportionate (P-LGA) if ponderal index (PI) (BW in grams/length in cm(3)) was 90th percentile and as disproportionate (D-LGA) if PI >90th percentile. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity: Apgar score 0-3 at 5 min, birth trauma, respiratory disorders, hypoglycemia, or hyperbilirubinemia. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) for adverse outcomes.

    RESULTSThe risk of composite neonatal morbidity was increased in GDM pregnancies versus control subjects but comparable between P- and D-LGA in both groups. D-LGA infants born to mothers without diabetes had significantly increased risk of birth trauma (OR 1.19 [95% CI 1.09-1.30]) and hypoglycemia (1.23 [1.11-1.37]). D-LGA infants in both groups had significantly increased odds of Cesarean section.

    CONCLUSIONSThe risk of composite neonatal morbidity is significantly increased in GDM offspring. In pregnancies both with and without GDM, the risk of composite neonatal morbidity is comparable between P- and D-LGA.

  • 14.
    Rask, Eva
    et al.
    Dept. of Pub. Hlth. and Clin. Med., Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Olsson, T.
    Dept. of Pub. Hlth. and Clin. Med., Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderberg, S.
    Dept. of Pub. Hlth. and Clin. Med., Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johnson, O.
    Dept. of Pub. Hlth. and Clin. Med., Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Seckl, J.
    Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Holst, J. J.
    Department of Medical Physiology, Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ahrén, B.
    Department of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Impaired incretin response after a mixed meal is associated with insulin resistance in nondiabetic men2001Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 24, nr 9, s. 1640-1645Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To investigate whether features of the insulin resistance syndrome are associated with altered incretin responses to food intake.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

    From a population-based study, 35 men were recruited, representing a wide spectrum of insulin sensitivity and body weight. Each subject underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to determine insulin sensitivity. A mixed meal was given, and plasma levels of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), as well as insulin, glucagon, and glucose were measured.

    RESULTS:

    Insulin resistance was associated with impaired GIP and GLP-1 responses to a mixed meal. The total area under the curve (AUC) of the GIP response after the mixed meal was associated with insulin sensitivity (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). There was a significant difference between the highest and the lowest tertile of insulin sensitivity (P < 0.05). GLP-1 levels 15 min after food intake were significantly lower in the most insulin-resistant tertile compared with the most insulin-sensitive tertile. During the first hour, the AUC of GLP-1 correlated significantly with insulin sensitivity (r = 0.47, P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that insulin resistance, but not obesity, was an independent predictor of these decreased incretin responses.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In insulin resistance, the GIP and GLP-1 responses to a mixed meal are impaired and are related to the degree of insulin resistance. Decreased incretin responsiveness may be of importance for the development of impaired glucose tolerance.

  • 15. Ridgway, Charlotte L.
    et al.
    Brage, Soren
    Anderssen, Sigmund A.
    Sardinha, Luis B.
    Andersen, Lars Bo
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Do physical activity and aerobic fitness moderate the association between birth weight and metabolic risk in youth?: The European youth heart study2011Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 34, nr 1, s. 187-192Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE- Lower birth weight has been associated with a greater risk of metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was examine whether physical activity and aerobic fitness may modify associations between birth weigh and metabolic risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- The European Youth Heart Study is a population-based study of 9 and 15 year olds (n = 1,254). Birth weight was maternally reported. Skin fold measures were used to calculate body fat and fat mass index (FMI = fat mass [kilograms]/height(2)). Insulin was measured using fasting blood samples. Physical activity was measured using a hip-worn accelerometer (MTI Actigraph) for >600 min/day for >= 3 days and is expressed as "average activity" (counts per minute) and time spent in above moderate intensity activity (>2000 cpm). Aerobic fitness was assessed using a maximal cycle ergometry test (watts per kilogram fat-free mass). RESULTS- Higher birth weight was associated with higher FMI (beta = 0.49 [95% CI 0.21-0.80]; P = 0.001) and greater waist circumference (0.90 [0.32-1.47]; P < 0.001), adjusted for sex, age-group, sexual maturity, height, and socioeconomic status. Lower birth weight was associated with higher fasting insulin only after further adjustment for adolescent waist circumference and height (-0.059 [-0.107 to 0.011]; P = 0.016). There was no evidence for any modification of the associations after adjustment for physical activity or aerobic fitness. CONCLUSIONS- The present study did not find any evidence that physical activity or aerobic fitness can moderate the associations among higher birth weight and increased fat mass and greater waist circumference or between lower birth weight and insulin resistance in healthy children and adolescents.

  • 16. Rössner, Sophia M.
    et al.
    Neovius, Martin
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Marcus, Claude
    Norgren, Svante
    Alternative methods of insulin sensitivity assessment in obese children and adolescents2008Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 31, nr 4, s. 802-804Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE—To validate fasting indexes against minimal model analysis (MMOD) of the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) in an obese pediatric population.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—FSIVGTT-MMOD results were compared with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and fasting insulin with the sample stratified by sex, puberty, and sensitivity index (Si) median in 191 children (82 males and 109 females, 13.9 ± 2.9 years of age, BMI 36.9 ± 6.2 kg/m2, BMI SD score 6.1 ± 1.6).

    RESULTS—Across pubertal groups, correlation coefficients between Si and HOMA-IR ranged from −0.43 to −0.78 in males and from −0.53 to −0.57 in females (age and BMI adjusted, P < 0.05 in all instances). Similar results were seen for fasting insulin. In females, the relationship was significantly weaker in more-insulin-resistant subjects.

    CONCLUSIONS—The validity of fasting indexes in explaining Si was sex dependent, varied with pubertal stage, and in females was influenced by degree of insulin sensitivity. In obese pediatric populations, we generally discourage the use of fasting indexes, although the validity varies within subgroups.

  • 17. Sardinha, Luis B.
    et al.
    Andersen, Lars Bo
    Anderssen, Sigmund A.
    Quitero, Ana L.
    Ornelas, Rui
    Froberg, Karsten
    Riddoch, Chris J.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Objectively measured time spent sedentary is associated with insulin resistance independent of overall and central body fat in 9- to 10-year-old portuguese children2008Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 31, nr 3, s. 569-575Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We examined the independent relationships between objectively measured physical activity and insulin resistance in Portuguese children. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a school-based, cross-sectional study in 147 randomly selected girls (aged 9.8 +/- 0.3 years; 27.8 +/- 9.3% body fat) and 161 boys (aged 9.8 +/- 0.3 years; 22.0 +/- 9.2% body fat). Physical activity was assessed by the Actigraph accelerometer for 4 days and summarized as time spent sedentary (accelerometer counts <500/min), in light-intensity (accelerometer counts 500-2,000/min), and in moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity (accelerometer counts >2,001/min). We measured total and central fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Insulin resistance was expressed as the homeostasis model assessment score. RESULTS: Time (min/day) spent sedentary was significantly and positively associated with insulin resistance (beta-coefficient = 0.001 [95% CI 0.0002-0.002]; P = 0.013). Time spent in moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity (-0.002 [-0.003 to -0.001]; P = 0.0009) and overall physical activity (-0.001 [-0.008 to 0.003]; P < 0.0001) were significantly and inversely associated with insulin resistance. All associations remained statistically significant, although they were attenuated after further adjustments for sex, birth weight, sexual maturity, and total or central fat mass (P < 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity is associated with insulin resistance independent of total and central fat mass in children. Our results emphasize the importance of decreasing sedentary behavior and increasing time spent in moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity in children, which may have beneficial effects on metabolic risk factors regardless of the degree of adiposity.

  • 18.
    Särnblad, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för läkarutbildning. Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, U.K. .
    Åman, Jan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin. Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Dietary fat intake predicts 1-year change in body fat in adolescent girls with type 1 diabetes2006Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 29, nr 6, s. 1227-1230Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether objectively measured physical activity and dietary macronutrient intake differentially predict body fat in adolescent girls with type 1 diabetes and control girls.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This study comprised 23 girls (12-19 years) with type 1 diabetes and 19 age-matched healthy control girls. At baseline, physical activity and energy intake were assessed for 7 consecutive days by accelerometry and a structured food diary, respectively. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and after 1 year.

    RESULTS: Fat intake was positively related to a 1-year change in percentage body fat (P = 0.006), after adjustment for total energy intake. No significant interaction was observed (case-control group x main exposure), indicating that the association between fat intake and gain in body fat was similar in both groups. Physical activity did not predict gain in body fat; however, total physical activity was positively associated with a gain in lean body mass (P < 0.01). Girls treated with six daily dosages of insulin increased their percentage of body fat significantly more than those treated with four daily injections (P < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective case-control study, we found that fat intake predicted gain in percentage of body fat in both adolescent girls with type 1 diabetes and healthy control girls. The number of daily insulin injections seems to influence the accumulation of body fat in girls with type 1 diabetes.

  • 19.
    Webb, Roger T.
    et al.
    Inst Brain Behav & Mental Hlth, Ctr Mental Hlth & Risk, Univ Manchester, Manchester, England.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Marie
    Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res & Educ, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kapur, Navneet
    Inst Brain Behav & Mental Hlth, Ctr Mental Hlth & Risk, Univ Manchester,Manchester, England.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Region Örebro län. Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Dept Pediat, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Runeson, Bo
    Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res & Educ, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unnatural Deaths in a National Cohort of People Diagnosed With Diabetes2014Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 37, nr 8, s. 2276-2283Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To examine risk of unnatural death among people diagnosed with diabetes irrespective of disease type. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a matched cohort study of the entire Swedish population using interlinked national registers. From the National Diabetes Register we identified 252,191 people diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or 2) during 1996-2009. Each cohort member was matched for age, sex, and county of birth to five unaffected individuals randomly sampled from the Total Population Register. Mortality was examined with complete ascertainment, and risk ratios (RRs) for all unnatural deaths and for specific causes (suicide, accident, homicide, and iatrogenic effects) were estimated using conditional fixed-effects Poisson regression. RESULTS Risk of any unnatural death was elevated versus the general population: 77.3 versus 32.1 per 10,000 (RR 2.2 [95% CI 2.1-2.4]), and these deaths occurred at a younger age in the diabetes cohort. Risk was increased for suicide (RR 3.4 [95% CI 3.0-3.8]), accident (RR 2.0 [95% CI 1.9-2.1]), homicide (RR 3.1 [95% CI 1.6-6.1]), and iatrogenic effects (RR 2.4 [95% CI 1.9-3.2]). It was greatly elevated for fatal poisoning from a variety of agents, including psychotropic drugs and "other and unspecified medication," as well as narcotics, alcohol, and carbon monoxide. Almost 9% of all fatal poisoning cases in the diabetes cohort were identified as overdoses of insulin or oral hypoglycemic drugs. CONCLUSIONS Various causes of unnatural death, in particular deliberate and accidental poisonings, occur more frequently among diabetic patients. Before preventive strategies can be implemented, a deeper understanding of the risk factors and causal mechanisms explaining the marked elevations in risk is needed.

  • 20.
    Östlund, Ingrid
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för klinisk medicin.
    Hanson, Ulf
    Björklund, Anders
    Hjertberg, Ragnhild
    Eva, Nord
    Nordlander, Elisabeth
    Swahn, Marja-Liisa
    Wager, Jan
    Maternal and fetal outcomes if gestational impaired glucose tolerance is not treated2003Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 26, nr 7, s. 2107-2111Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
1 - 20 of 20
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf