oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Sch Social & Hlth Sci, Halmstad Univ, Halmstad, Sweden; Halmstad Cty Hosp, Halmstad, Sweden .
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Sch Social & Hlth Sci, Halmstad Univ, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nissen, Eva
    Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish childbirth self-efficacy inventory (Swe-CBSEI)2014In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 14, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research has reported that women who are admitted to delivery wards in early labour process before an active stage of labour has started run an increased risk of instrumental deliveries. Therefore, it is essential to focus on factors such as self-efficacy that can enhance a woman's own ability to cope with the first stage of labour. However, there was no Swedish instrument measuring childbirth self-efficacy available. Thus, the aim of the study was to translate the Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory and to psychometrically test the Swedish version on first-time mothers within the Swedish culture. Methods: The method included a forward-backward translation with face and content validity. The psychometric properties were evaluated using a Principal Component Analysis and by using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and inter-item correlations. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were used to describe and compare the scales. All data were collected from January 2011 to June 2012, from 406 pregnant women during the gestational week 35-42. Results: The Swedish version of the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory indicated good reliability and the Principal Component Analysis showed a three-component structure. The Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Test indicated that the women could differentiate between the concepts outcome expectancy and self-efficacy expectatancy and between the two labour stages, active stage and the second stage of labour. Conclusions: The Swedish version of Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory is a reliable and valid instrument. The inventory can act as a tool to identify those women who need extra support and to evaluate the efforts of improving women's self-efficacy during pregnancy.

  • 2.
    Maghsoudlou, Siavash
    et al.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden; Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Aarabi, Mohsen
    Faculty of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.
    Semnani, Shahriar
    Faculty of Medicine, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bahmanyar, Shahram
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit & Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Opium use during pregnancy and infant size at birth: a cohort study2018In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The reported positive association between opiatic drug use during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes might be confounded by other factors related to high-risk behaviors, including the use of other harmful substances. In rural areas of Iran, opium use during pregnancy is relatively common among women who otherwise do not have a hazardous lifestyle, which reduces the risk of residual confounding and increasing the possibility to identify its effects. We aimed to examine the association of antenatal exposure to opium with risks of small for gestational age, short birth length, and small head circumference at birth.

    METHOD: In this cohort study in the rural area of the Golestan province, Iran, we randomly selected 920 women who were exposed to opium during pregnancy and 920 unexposed women during 2008-2010. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between prenatal exposure to opium and risks of small for gestational age, short birth length, and small head circumference at birth.

    RESULTS: Compared with non-use of opium and tobacco during pregnancy, using opium only and dual use of opium and tobacco were associated with increased risks of small for gestational age at births (RR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.34-2.18 and RR = 1.62; 95% CI 1.13-2.30, respectively). Compared with non-use of opium and tobacco, exposure to only opium or dual use of opium and tobacco were also associated with more than doubled increased risks of short birth length, and small head circumference in term infants.

    CONCLUSION: Maternal opium use during pregnancy is associated with increased risks of giving birth to a small for gestational age infant, as well as a term infant with short birth length or small head circumference.

  • 3.
    Maghsoudlou, Siavash
    et al.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran.
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stephansson, Olof
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aarabi, Mohsen
    Faculty of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.
    Semnani, Shahriar
    Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran.
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Bahmanyar, Shahram
    Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran; Clinical Epidemiology Unit & Center for Pharmacoepidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maternal haemoglobin concentrations before and during pregnancy and stillbirth risk: a population-based case-control study2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Results of previous studies on the association between maternal haemoglobin concentration during pregnancy and stillbirth risk are inconclusive. It is not clear if haemoglobin concentration before pregnancy has a role. Using prospectively collected information from pre-pregnancy and antenatal visits, we investigated associations of maternal haemoglobin concentrations before and during pregnancy and haemoglobin dilution with stillbirth risk.

    Methods: In a population-based case-control study from rural Golestan, a province in northern Iran, we identified 495 stillbirths (cases) and randomly selected 2,888 control live births among antenatal health-care visits between 2007 and 2009. Using logistic regression, we estimated associations of maternal haemoglobin concentrations, haemoglobin dilution at different stages of pregnancy, with stillbirth risk.

    Results: Compared with normal maternal haemoglobin concentration (110-120 g/l) at the end of the second trimester, high maternal haemoglobin concentration (≥140 g/l) was associated with a more than two-fold increased stillbirth risk (OR = 2.31, 95 % CI [1.30-4.10]), while low maternal haemoglobin concentration (<110 g/l) was associated with a 37 % reduction in stillbirth risk. Haemoglobin concentration before pregnancy was not associated with stillbirth risk. Decreased haemoglobin concentration, as measured during pregnancy (OR = 0.61, 95 % CI [0.46, 0.80]), or only during the second trimester (OR = 0.75, 95 % CI [0.62, 0.90]), were associated with reduced stillbirth risk. The associations were essentially similar for preterm and term stillbirths.

    Conclusions: Haemoglobin concentration before pregnancy is not associated with stillbirth risk. High haemoglobin level and absence of haemoglobin dilution during pregnancy could be considered as indicators of a high-risk pregnancy.

  • 4.
    Saeedi, Maryam
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hanson, Ulf
    Department of Women's and Children's health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of medical health and sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Simmons, David
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of medical health and sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Macarthur Clinical School, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia.
    Fadl, Helena
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Characteristics of different risk factors and fasting plasma glucose for identifying GDM when using IADPSG criteria: a cross-sectional study2018In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare (SNBHW) recommended the new diagnostic criteria for GDM based upon Hyperglycaemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study thresholds. Due to limited knowledge base, no recommendations were made on GDM screening. The aim of this study is to evaluate test characteristics of risk factors and fasting blood glucose as screening tests for diagnosing GDM using diagnostic thresholds based upon HAPO study 1.75/2.0 (model I/II respectively) odds ratio for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional, population-based study included all pregnant women who attended maternal health care in Örebro County, Sweden between the years 1994-96. A 75 g OGTT with capillary fasting and 2-h blood glucose was offered to all pregnant women at week 28-32. Risk factors and repeated random glucose samples were collected. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of blood glucose were calculated.

    RESULTS: Prevalence of GDM was 11.7% with model I and 7.2% with the model II criteria. Risk factors showed 28%, (95% CI 24-32) and 31%, (95% CI 25-37) sensitivity for model I and II respectively. A fasting cut off ≥4.8 mmol/l occurred in 24% of women with 91%, (95% CI 88-94) sensitivity and 85%, (95% CI 83-86) specificity using model I while a fasting cut off ≥5.0 mmol/l occurred in 14% with 91%, (95% CI 87-94) sensitivity and 92%, (95% CI 91-93) specificity using model II.

    CONCLUSION: Risk factor screening for GDM was found to be poorly predictive of GDM but fasting glucose of 4.8-5.0 mmol/l showed good test characteristics irrespective of diagnostic model and results in a low rate of OGTTs.

  • 5.
    Thorell, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine unit, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine unit, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pregnancy related back pain, is it related to aerobic fitness?: A longitudinal cohort study2012In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 12, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low back pain with onset during pregnancy is common and approximately one out of three women have disabling pain. The pathogenesis of the pain condition is uncertain and there is no information on the role of physical fitness. Whether poorer physical conditioning is a cause or effect of back pain is also disputed and information from prospective studies needed.

    Methods: A cohort of pregnant women, recruited from maternal health care centers in central Sweden, were examined regarding estimated peak oxygen uptake by cycle ergometer test in early pregnancy, reported physical activity prior to pregnancy, basic characteristics, back pain during pregnancy and back pain postpartum.

    Results: Back pain during the current pregnancy was reported by nearly 80% of the women. At the postpartum appointment this prevalence was 40%. No association was displayed between estimated peak oxygen uptake and incidence of back pain during and after pregnancy, adjusted for physical activity, back pain before present pregnancy, previous deliveries, age and weight. A significant inverse association was found between estimated peak oxygen uptake and back pain intensity during pregnancy and a direct association post partum, in a fully adjusted multiple linear regression analysis.

    Conclusions: Estimated peak oxygen uptake and reported physical activity in early pregnancy displayed no influence on the onset of subsequent back pain during or after pregnancy, where the time sequence support the hypothesis that poorer physical deconditioning is not a cause but a consequence of the back pain condition. The mechanism for the attenuating effect of increased oxygen uptake on back pain intensity is uncertain.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf