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  • 1.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Exploration of Theoretical Ganglionated Plexi Ablation Technique in Atrial Fibrillation Surgery COMMENTARY2014In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 98, no 5, p. 1604-1605Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahlsson, Anders J.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Lundblad, Olof H.
    Englund, Anders G.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation is not correlated to C-reactive protein2007In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 83, no 4, p. 1332-1337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The peak incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs around the second postoperative day, a time at which serum inflammatory markers are elevated. The aim of this study was to investigate differences between patients with and without postoperative AF with special regard to C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels. METHODS: The study cohort included all heart surgery patients who had sinus rhythm preoperatively, survived postoperative day 3, and were operated on between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005 (n = 524). Any episode of AF during the first 7 postoperative days defined the patient as belonging to the postoperative AF group. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) was measured at postoperative day 1, and CRP was measured preoperatively and at postoperative day 3. Risk factors for postoperative AF were determined using bivariate and multivariate regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 524 patients, 182 had at least one episode of AF (34.7%). Preoperative and postoperative CRP concentrations did not differ between the groups (postoperative CRP 175.4 +/- 64.4 versus 175.3 +/- 60.1 mg/L respectively, p = 0.99). Atrial fibrillation patients were significantly older (p < 0.001) and had higher CK-MB levels (33.6 +/- 53.1 microg/L versus 22.5 +/- 26.7 microg/L, respectively, p = 0.009). The odds ratio for postoperative AF with postoperative CK-MB greater than 70 microg/L was 3.5 (confidence interval: 1.4 to 8.6). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative AF has no correlation to the inflammatory marker CRP in heart surgery patients. Ischemic myocardial injury might predispose for postoperative AF.

  • 3.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wickbom, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Geirsson, Arnar
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Franco-Cereceda, Anders
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahmad, Khalil
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Gunn, Jarmo
    Heart Center, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Hansson, Emma C.
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hjortdal, Vibeke
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Jarvela, Kati
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mennander, Ari
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nozohoor, Shahab
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pan, Emily
    Heart Center, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Zindovic, Igor
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gudbjartsson, Tomas
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Olsson, Christian
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Is There a Weekend Effect in Surgery for Type A Dissection?: Results From the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Database2019In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 770-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aortic dissection type A requires immediate surgery. In general surgery populations, patients operated on during weekends have higher mortality rates compared with patients whose operations occur on weekdays. The weekend effect in aortic dissection type A has not been studied in detail.

    Methods: The Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD) registry includes data for 1,159 patients who underwent type A dissection surgery at 8 Nordic centers during 2005 to 2014. This study is based on data relating to surgery conducted during weekdays versus weekends and starting between 8:00 AM and 8:00 Pm ("daytime") versus from 8:00 Pm to 8:00 AM ("nighttime"), as well as time from symptoms, admittance, and diagnosis to surgery. The influence of timing of surgery on the 30-day mortality rate was assessed using logistic regression analysis.

    Results: The 30-day mortality was 18% (204 of 1,159), with no difference in mortality between surgery performed on weekdays (17% [150 of 889]) and on weekends (20% [54 of 270], p = 0.45), or during nighttime (19% [87 of 467]) versus daytime (17% [117 of 680], p = 0.54). Time from symptoms to surgery (median 7.0 hours vs 6.5 hours, p = 0.31) did not differ between patients who survived and those who died at 30 days. Multivariable regression analysis of risk factors for 30-day mortality showed no weekend effect (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 60.67 to 1.60; p = 0.875), but nighttime surgery was a risk factor (odds ratio, 2.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.29 to 4.56; p = 0.006).

    Conclusions: The 30-day mortality in surgical repair of aortic dissection type A was not significantly affected by timing of surgery during weekends versus weekdays. Nighttime surgery seems to predict increased 30-day mortality, after correction for other risk factors.

  • 4.
    Damén, Tor
    et al.
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sunnermalm, Lena
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Zagozdzon, Leszek
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cederstrand, Bo
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kellert, Tomas
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Inverted valve after initially successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation2012In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 636-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 73-year-old woman with severe aortic stenosis was accepted for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. There was minimal paravalvular leakage after the implantation, and the patient was stable. Twelve minutes after the implantation, the arterial pressure suddenly dropped. Transesophageal echocardiography showed severe left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started, and initially was successful with a systolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg. However, despite initiation of extracorporeal circulation support, the patient deteriorated, pulmonary edema developed, and she died. Autopsy revealed an inverted aortic valve. The reasons why the patient had cardiac arrest and an inverted transfemoral aortic valve remain unclear.

  • 5.
    Dreifaldt, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mannion, John D.
    Department of Surgery, Bayhealth Medical Center, Dover DE, USA.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Olsson, Hans
    Zagozdzon, Leszek
    Souza, Domingos S. R.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    The No-Touch Saphenous Vein as the Preferred Second Conduit for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting2013In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 105-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Injury incurred while saphenous veins are being obtained results in poor graft patency and impairs the results of coronary artery bypass grafting. A novel method of obtaining veins, the no-touch technique, has shown improved long-term saphenous vein graft patency. Methods. This randomized trial included 108 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and compared the patency of no-touch saphenous vein with that of radial artery grafts. Each patient was assigned to receive one no-touch saphenous vein and one radial artery graft to either the left or the right coronary territory to complement the left internal thoracic artery. Results. Angiography was performed in 99 patients (92%) at a mean of 36 months postoperatively. Graft and grafted coronary artery patency was evaluated. The patency of grafts for no-touch saphenous vein and radial artery was 94% versus 82% (p = 0.01), respectively. The patency of coronary arteries grafted with no-touch saphenous vein and radial artery grafts was 95% versus 84% (p = 0.005), respectively. Eighty-nine of 96 (93%) left internal thoracic artery grafts were patent. Conclusions. No-touch saphenous vein grafts showed a significantly higher patency rate than the radial artery grafts and the patency was comparable to the patency for left internal thoracic artery grafts. This highlights the improvement in saphenous vein graft quality with the no-touch technique and increases the number of situations in which saphenous veins may be preferable to radial artery grafts as conduits in coronary artery bypass grafting. (C) 2013 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

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