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  • 1.
    Annika, Lindh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Centre for clinical research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Theander, Kersti
    Centre for clinical research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Arne, Mats
    Centre for clinical research, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy & Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lundh, Lena
    Academic Primary Health Care Centre, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, NVS, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandelowsky, Hanna
    Academic Primary Health Care Centre, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, NVS, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Primary health care, Region Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Zakrisson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Healthcare Research Center.
    Description of inhalation technique in patients with COPD in primary care2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52, no Suppl. 62, article id PA2070Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: A recent systematic review showed that only about one third of the patients had a correct inhalation technique and the number had not improved the last 40 years¹.

    Aim: The aim was to describe errors, separated into errors related to devices and errors related to inhalation technique, that occur when patients with COPD inhale medications.

    Method: In this descriptive study, patients with a COPD diagnosis were recruited from a randomized controlled trial performed 2015-2016 in primary care in four county councils in Sweden. A COPD nurse assessed the inhalation technique using a checklist with errors related to devices and to inhalation technique with possibility to write additional comments.

    Results: In total, 167 patients using 287 inhalers were assessed, 52% (n = 86) were female, mean age 71 years. A total of 163 errors were noted in the checklist, of which 87 were related to inhalation technique and 76 were related to devices. Except from this the COPD nurse had written comments regarding 53 errors that were not included in the checklist. At least one error (range: 1-7 errors) was made by 46% (n = 76) of the patients.

    Conclusion: The results show that many patients do not use the device correctly. Both errors related to inhalation technique and related to devices were present. This implies that there is a need to focus on both aspects when teaching patients how to inhale their medication. The checklist used in this study needs to be further improved.

  • 2.
    Brocki, Barbara Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Andreasen, Jane
    Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Public Health and Epidemiology Group, Department of Health, Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Andreasen, Jan Jesper
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Can the Melbourne Scoring Scale be used to assess postoperative pulmonary complications in high-risk patients following lung resection?2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52, no Suppl. 62, article id PA1423Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) are common following lung resections, but there is no consensus in the literature on the definition of a clinically relevant PPC. This study aimed to use the Melbourne Scoring Scale (MGS) to determine the frequency and predictors of PPC in patients scheduled for lung resection on suspicion of or due to cancer.

    Methods: In a prospective observational design, we assessed 87 consecutive patients following lung resections in Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. Patients were preoperatively classified as being at high PPC-risk (n= 68) or low PPC-risk (n=19), based on the presence of one or more of the items: FEV1 or carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) ≤70%, age ≥70 years or scheduled pneumonectomy. Data on PPC was collected daily and re-evaluated two weeks postoperatively. Multivariate regression analysis was used to evaluate variables associated with PPC.

    Results: The actual frequency of PPC according to the MGS was 11% (n=10), all cases within the predefined high-risk group, with pneumonia accounting for 10% of the cases. We found that preoperative FEV1 and DLCO ≤60% were significantly associated with a higher PPC risk (area under the ROC curve 0.851), 95% CI 2.2-56.6 and 1.1-36.8 for FEV1 and DLCO, respectively.

    Conclusions: The MGS can be used to identify patients at high risk of postoperative clinically relevant PPC after lung resections, in particular in patients with preoperative values of FEV1 ≤ 60% or DLCO ≤ 60%. More research is needed to evaluate the effect of preventable interventions targeting patients at high-risk of developing PPC.

  • 3.
    Canova, Cristina
    et al.
    Dept Mol Med, Lab Publ Hlth & Populat Studies, Univ Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Pitter, Gisella
    Dept Mol Med, Lab Publ Hlth & Populat Studies, Univ Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.; Dept Pediat, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Romor, Pierantonio
    Reg Hlth Informat Syst, Informat Sistema Enti Locali INSIEL SpA, Udine, Italy.
    Zanier, Loris
    Epidemiol Serv, Hlth Directorate Friuli Venezia Giulia Reg, Udine, Italy.
    Zanotti, Renzo
    Dept Mol Med, Lab Publ Hlth & Populat Studies, Univ Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Simonato, Lorenzo
    Dept Mol Med, Lab Publ Hlth & Populat Studies, Univ Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Coeliac disease and asthma association in children: the role of antibiotic consumption2015In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between coeliac disease and asthma has been scarcely investigated. Infant antibiotic exposure has been linked to both diseases. We evaluated the association between childhood coeliac disease and asthma and the role of antibiotics in the first year of life. We followed a cohort of children born in 1995-2011 in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region (Italy). Prescriptions for antibiotics in the first year of life and subsequent treated asthma were retrieved from drug prescription records; coeliac disease incident cases were identified from pathology reports, hospital discharges and exemption from prescription charges for clinical tests.We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) using multivariate Poisson regression models. Among the 143 144 children, we identified 717 coeliac children and 34 969 asthmatics. Children with asthma were at increased risk of coeliac disease (IRR 1.46, 95% CI 1.25-1.67). Restricting the analysis to asthma that occurred before the diagnosis of coeliac disease, the excess risk disappeared, except for coeliac disease diagnosed after 5 years of age (IRR 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.71). Antibiotics were not a confounding factor in these associations. Childhood treated asthma and coeliac disease are significantly associated. This association is not confounded by antibiotic exposure in the first year of life and may be explained by other shared risk factors.

  • 4.
    Ericson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kampe, Mary
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Efraimsson, Eva Osterlund
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Patients' evaluation on asthma severity was related to level of asthma control and quality of life over seven years follow-up2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 42, no 57, article id 2744Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Jones, Rupert
    et al.
    University of Plymouth, Plymouth, England.
    Price, David
    University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
    Chavannes, Niels
    Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Lee, Amanda
    University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
    Gabe-Thomas, Elizabeth
    University of Plymouth, Plymouth, England.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    A comparison of multi-component indices of COPD severity in primary care: An UNLOCK study from the IPCRG2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 42, no 57, article id 2831Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Jonsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Physiotherapy.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Medical Diagnostics.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Cardiovascular Division, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Department of Vascular and Cardiothoracic surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Physiotherapy/CAMTÖ.
    Physical activity level during the first three days after lung cancer surgery improves with physiotherapy: a randomized controlled trial2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52, no Suppl. 62, article id OA5189Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Physical inactivity is common after lung cancer surgery. Patients undergoing lung cancer surgery are routinely offered physiotherapy. Despite its routine use, any effect on postoperative physical activity has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether physiotherapy could improve physical activity during the first days after surgery.

    Methods: A total of 94 patients undergoing elective surgery for confirmed or suspected lung cancer were consecutevily included and randomized to treatment group (n=50) or control group (n=44). The treatment group received daily physiotherapy, consisting of mobilization and ambulation, shoulder exercises and breathing exercises. The control group received no physiotherapy. Physical activity was assessed with the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer.

    Results: The patients in the treatment group reached significantly more counts (1692 vs 1197, p=0.029) and steps per hour (39 vs 25, p=0.013), during the first three days, compared to the control group.

    Conclusions: Physical activity during the first three days is increased by physiotherapy treament. The long term effect of in-hospital physiotherapy needs to be further evaluated.

  • 7.
    Larsson, Matz L.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Loit, H.-M.
    Meren, M.
    Pölluste, J.
    Magnusson, A.
    Larsson, K.
    Lundbäck, B.
    Passive smoking and respiratory symptoms in the FinEsS Study2003In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 672-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between reported environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and respiratory symptoms. In 1996, a postal questionnaire was randomly distributed in three areas of Estonia to a population-based sample, of which 4,995 females and 1,822 males had never smoked. The main outcome measures were current respiratory symptoms and the amount of reported ETS exposure outside the home. ETS exposure at home was more common in females (31% versus 19%), while exposure outside of the home was more common in males (53% versus 7%). Females reported more symptoms from tobacco smoke than males (37.7% versus 21.6%). If ETS exposure outside of the home exceeded 5 h daily, the risk for wheeze (odds ratio (OR) 2.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.98-3.61) and physician-diagnosed asthma (OR 1.79, 1.02-3.16) were increased. ETS exposure outside of the home was shown to be strongly related to almost all respiratory symptoms in a dose/response manner. ETS exposure at home did not show significantly elevated ORs for any respiratory symptoms. This study shows that females seem to be more troubled by environmental smoke exposure than males and provides further evidence of the serious health hazards associated with environmental smoke exposure. Indeed, the findings of this study support a ban on smoking in the workplace and public areas.

  • 8.
    Lassmann-Klee, Paul
    et al.
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brumpton, Ben
    Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Clinic of Thoracic and Occupational Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Henriksen, Anne Hildur
    Clinic of Thoracic and Occupational Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Larsson, Matz
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Sundblad, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Polluste, Jaak
    The National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Lindqvist, Ari
    Clinical Research Unit of Pulmonary Diseases, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå university, Umeå, Sweden.
    Backman, Helena
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå university, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå university, Umeå, Sweden.
    Langhammer, Arnulf
    HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
    Piirilä, Päivi
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Sovijärvi, Anssi R. A.
    Unit of Clinical Physiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Differences of FENO in adult general populations of Nordic regions2019In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 54, no Suppl. 63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Eventual differences of expiratory nitric oxide (FENO) levels in general populations of Nordic countries may reflect differences in eosinophilic inflammation at population level.

    Aim: To study the differences in FENO of Nordic regions and their epidemiological associations.

    Methods: From 1997 to 2003 we measured FENO (ppb) and conducted skin prick-tests for a random sample of adults (n=1498), aged 20-60 years from Finland (Helsinki), Sweden (Stockholm and Örebro) and Estonia (Narva and Saaremaa). We compared differences between regions by estimating odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for high FENO (>25 ppb) using logistic regression adjusted for gender, smoking and allergy. Finally, we estimated crude ORs and 95% CIs for high FENO and for asthma, rhinitis, current asthma symptoms and asthma medication.

    Results: The mean and standard deviation (SD) for FENO was 19(14) in Finland, 18(12) in Sweden and 16(15) in Estonia (p<0.001). Estonia had a lower mean FENO than other countries, with no differences between Finland and Sweden. Compared to Helsinki, the adjusted OR (95%CI) for high FENO was 0.42(0.21-0.81) in Stockholm, 0.65(0.43-0.98) in Örebro, 0.53(0.32-0.84) in Narva and 0.45(0.28-0.71) in Saaremaa. In Estonia, high FENO was associated with asthma, allergy, rhinitis, current asthma, and asthma medication; in Finland with rhinitis and use of short acting β-agonist; in Sweden with asthma and asthma medication. Smoking was associated with low FENO. Mean FENO in asthmatics was 24(19) in Finland, 20(12) in Sweden, and 43(49) in Estonia (p=0.07).

    Conclusions: We observed a higher mean FENO in Finland and Sweden compared to Estonia, and found no overall differences of FENO levels in asthmatics.

  • 9.
    Lisspers, Karin
    et al.
    Family Medicine & Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Resp Med & Allergol, Med Sci, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kampe, Mary
    Resp Med & Allergol, Med Sci, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Österlund, Eva
    Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Ericson, Anna
    Family Med & Prevent Med, Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala Uiniversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stallberg, Bjorn
    Family Med & Prevent Med, Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala Uiniversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A follow-up of patients with a new diagnosis of asthma - characteristics, prognosis and risk factors2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 42, no 57, article id 3457Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnerbeck, Anna
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet; Neuropediatric Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet; Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    D'Onofrio, Brian
    Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, United States of America.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Pershagen, Goran
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Catarina
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet; Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Lung and Allergy Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tobacco exposure in utero and childhood asthma and wheeze - a register-based cohort study2019In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 54, no Suppl. 63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have found associations between smoking during pregnancy (SDP) and childhood asthma/wheeze. Although nicotine has been suggested as a causal agent, the mechanism is unclear. In Sweden, oral moist snuff (snus) is a common form of tobacco, with high nicotine levels, but no combustion.

    Aim: To estimate the association between tobacco use in pregnancy, both smoking and snus, and asthma/wheeze in the child, to examine the role of nicotine.

    Methods: Our cohort included 897 975 children, born in Sweden 2005-2012. Information on SDP and snus use came from the Medical Birth Registry. We based the asthma/wheeze outcome on diagnoses and drugs from national health registers, as incident asthma at age 0-7 yrs and prevalent asthma at ages 2-6 yrs.

    Results: For the association of SDP and asthma/wheeze, we saw a pattern with higher hazard ratios around 5 and 18 months of age (Figure 1). Snus did not show the same pattern. Prevalent asthma, showed the strongest association with SDP at age 2 yrs (adjOR=1.22 95% CI: 1.17-1.28). The corresponding estimates for snus was adjOR=1.06 (95% CI: 0.96-1.18).

    Conclusion: We saw an association between SDP and asthma at early age, but the association with snus was much weaker. The results suggest that nicotine is not a causal agent in the SDP – asthma association.

  • 11.
    Osvald, Emma Caffrey
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bower, Hannah
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brew, Bronwyn K.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Catarina
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Asthma and all-cause mortality in children and young adults - a Swedish population based study2019In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 54, no Suppl. 63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about the relationship between asthma in children and young adults and all-cause mortality. Studies suggest an increased rate of death among adults with asthma. Additionally among children, there is a rising prevalence of life-limiting conditions, defined as conditions with no hope of cure.

    Aim: To investigate the association between asthma and all-cause mortality in children and young adults aged 1-25 years and to explore if this effect is modified by life-limiting conditions.

    Method: This register based study includes 2,775,430 individuals born in Sweden between January 1986 and December 2012. Asthma cases, those with life-limiting conditions and other covariates were identified using Swedish national registers. The association between asthma and all-cause mortality was estimated using Cox proportional hazards model. A Cox model with an interaction term between asthma and life-limiting condition was also fitted to assess effect modification.

    Results: 261,322 asthma cases were identified during the follow-up. The unadjusted all-cause mortality rate for asthma cases was greater than for non-asthma cases with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.67 (95% CI 1.54-1.83). Adjusting for covariates altered the HR to 1.46 (95% CI 1.33-1.62). Having a life-limiting condition was a significant effect modifier (p=0.002); for patients with a life-limiting condition the HR was 1.86 (95% CI 1.57-2.22) and in patients without a life-limiting condition the HR was 1.33 (95% CI 1.18-1.49).

    Conclusion: All-cause mortality in children and young adults is higher in those with asthma compared to those without asthma. Life-limiting conditions modify the effect of asthma on all-cause mortality.

  • 12.
    Stallberg, Bjorn
    et al.
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Family Med & Prevent, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Dept Med Sci Resp Med & Allergol, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kampe, Mary
    Dept Med Sci Resp Med & Allergol, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Efraimsson, Eva Osterlund
    Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Ericson, Anna
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Family Med & Prevent, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Family Med & Prevent, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    New GOLD recommendations in a seven years follow up - changes in symptoms and risk categories2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 42, no 57, article id 2742Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Physiotherapy/CAMTÖ.
    Arne, Mats
    Department of Medical Sciences Respiratory, Allergy & Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Centre for clinical research, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Matz
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. The Heart-Lung Clinic, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; The Tobacco preventive unit, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Engman, Kjell Ola
    Sörmland County Council, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Spirometry to motivate smoking cessation - a systematic review2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52, no Suppl. 62, article id PA1734Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Westerdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Urell, Charlotte
    Physiotherapy, Dept Neurosci, Uppsala University, Örebro, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Marcus
    Dept Physiotherapy & Cardiothorac Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Hedenstrom, Hans
    Dept Med Sci, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Emtner, Margareta
    Dept Med Sci, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Home-based deep breathing exercises after cardiac surgery - A randomized controlled trial2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 42, no 57, article id 4678Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Zakrisson, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Arne, M.
    Hasselgren, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lisspers, K.
    Sandelowsky, H.
    Ställberg, B.
    Thors Adolfsson, E.
    Theander, K.
    A description of requests for self-management support among patients with COPD in Primary Health Care2017In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 50, no Sup. 61, article id PA1605Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Zakrisson, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Theander, Kersti
    Primary Care Res Unity, City Council Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Anerös, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Longitudinal effects of a multidisciplinary programme of pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary health care2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 42, no 57, article id 994Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • rtf