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  • 1.
    Hamsten, C.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Inflammatory Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Starkhammar, M.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tran, T. A.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Life Sciences, Södertörns University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, U.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlén, G.
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sällberg, M.
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grönlund, H.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    van Hage, M.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Immunology and Allergy Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Identification of galactose-α-1,3-galactose in the gastrointestinal tract of the tick Ixodes ricinus; possible relationship with red meat allergy2013In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 549-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with IgE antibodies against the carbohydrate epitope galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) have reported severe allergic reactions after consumption of red meat. Investigations have revealed associations between IgE to α-Gal and tick bites. We provide the first direct evidence that α-Gal is present within ticks thus potentially explaining the relationship between tick exposure and sensitization to α-Gal, with development of red meat allergy as a secondary phenomena. Serum from Swedish patients with delayed severe reactions to red meat was included in the study. A dose-dependent inhibition of IgE responses to α-Gal by the tick Ixodes ricinus is demonstrated. Furthermore, using cryostat-cut sections of I. ricinus, we show that both a monoclonal and a polyclonal antibody against α-Gal stains the gastrointestinal tract of the tick. The same pattern is seen when staining with patient sera IgE positive to α-Gal. These results confirm that the α-Gal epitope is present in I. ricinus and imply host exposure to α-Gal during a tick bite. This provides further evidence that tick bites are associated with IgE responses to α-Gal and red meat allergy.

  • 2.
    Hellquist, H. B.
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mats G.
    Department of Pathology, Örebro Medical Center Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nasal memory T lymphocytes capable of producing IL-4 in the allergic reaction1992In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 47, no 4 Pt 1, p. 334-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the presence of memory T cells in the nasal mucosa of allergic patients. The demonstration of CD4+/CD29+ (CD4+/CD45RO+) T lymphocytes, which are capable of interleukin-4 production, can indicate a complementary cell-mediated regulatory mechanism for mast cell proliferation and IgE synthesis in human nasal allergy. No substantial IgE production can be obtained in the absence of IL-4. Therefore, the existence of IL-4 producing cells on site in the nasal mucosa of allergic subjects probably implies a complementary interaction between cytokines and different immunocompetent nasal cells in the regulation of B cells and IgE synthesis.

  • 3.
    Lindgren, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Respiratory Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Division, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College, London, UK.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy & Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Factors associated with well-controlled asthma: A cross-sectional study2019In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Mogensen, N.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundholm, C.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, C.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Association between childhood asthma and ADHD symptoms in adolescence: a prospective population-based twin study2011In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 1224-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cross-sectional studies report a relationship between childhood asthma and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, but the mechanisms are yet unclear. Our objective was to investigate the longitudinal link between childhood asthma and the two dimensions of ADHD (hyperactivity-impulsivity, HI, and inattention, IN) in adolescence. We also aimed to explore the genetic and environmental contributions and the impact of asthma medication.

    Methods: Data on asthma, HI and IN, birth weight, socioeconomic status, zygosity, and medication were collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register and through parental questionnaires at ages 8-9 and 13-14 years on 1480 Swedish twin pairs born 1985-1986. The association between asthma at age 8-9 and ADHD symptoms at age 13-14 was assessed with generalized estimating equations, and twin analyses to assess the genetic or environmental determinants were performed.

    Results: Children with asthma at age 8-9 had an almost twofold increased risk of having one or more symptom of HI (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.18-3.00) and a more than twofold increased risk to have three symptoms or more of HI (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.49-5.00) at age 13-14, independent of asthma medication. For IN, no significant relationship was seen. Results from twin modeling indicate that 68% of the phenotypic correlation between asthma and HI (r=0.23, 0.04-0.37) was because of genetic influences.

    Conclusions Our findings suggest that childhood asthma is associated with subsequent development of HI in early adolescence, which could be partly explained by genetic influences. Early strategies to identify children at risk may reduce burden of the disease in adolescence.

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