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  • 1. Andersson, H.
    et al.
    Hartmanová, B.
    Bäck, Erik
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Eliasson, H.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Landfors, M.
    Näslund, L.
    Rydén, P.
    Sjöstedt, A.
    Transcriptional profiling of the peripheral blood response during tularemia2006In: Genes and Immunity, ISSN 1466-4879, E-ISSN 1476-5470, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 503-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tularemia is a febrile disease caused by the highly contagious bacterium Francisella tularensis. We undertook an analysis of the transcriptional response in peripheral blood during the course of ulceroglandular tularemia by use of Affymetrix microarrays comprising 14,500 genes. Samples were obtained from seven individuals at five occasions during 2 weeks after the first hospital visit and convalescent samples 3 months later. In total, 265 genes were differentially expressed, 95 of which at more than one time point. The differential expression was verified with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for 36 genes (R(2)=0.590). The most prominent changes were noted in samples drawn on days 2-3 and a considerable proportion of the upregulated genes appeared to represent an interferon-gamma-induced response and also a proapoptotic response. Genes involved in the generation of innate and acquired immune responses were found to be downregulated, presumably a pathogen-induced event. A logistic regression analysis revealed that seven genes were good predictors of the early phase of tularemia. This is the first description of the transcriptional host response to ulceroglandular tularemia and the study has identified gene subsets relevant to the pathogenesis of the disease and subsets that may serve as early diagnostic biomarkers.

  • 2.
    Assadi, G.
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Saleh, R.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hadizadeh, F.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vesterlund, L.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bonfiglio, F.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Törkvist, L.
    Gastrocentrum, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, A. S.
    Gatroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgren's University Hospital/Östra, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Harris, H. E.
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, E.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    D'Amato, M.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; BioCruces Health Research Institute and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain.
    LACC1 polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis2016In: Genes and Immunity, ISSN 1466-4879, E-ISSN 1476-5470, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 261-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The function of the Laccase domain-containing 1 (LACC1) gene is unknown, but genetic variation at this locus has been reported to consistently affect the risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and leprosy. Recently, a LACC1 missense mutation was found in patients suffering from monogenic forms of CD, but also systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that LACC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in addition to CD, are associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, non-systemic), and another major form of inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis (UC). We selected 11 LACC1 tagging SNPs, and tested their effect on disease risk in 3855 Swedish individuals from three case-control cohorts of CD, UC and JIA. We detected false discovery rate corrected significant associations with individual markers in all three cohorts, thereby expanding previous results for CD also to UC and JIA. LACC1's link to several inflammatory diseases suggests a key role in the human immune system and justifies further characterization of its function(s).

  • 3.
    Maertzdorf, Jeroen
    et al.
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany .
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology, Genetics and Biometry, Dummerstorf, Germany.
    Parida, S K
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany .
    Stanley, K
    Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa .
    Roberts, T
    Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa .
    Black, G
    Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa .
    Walzl, G
    Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa .
    Kaufmann, S H E
    Department of Immunology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany .
    Human gene expression profiles of susceptibility and resistance in tuberculosis2011In: Genes and Immunity, ISSN 1466-4879, E-ISSN 1476-5470, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tuberculosis (TB) still poses a profound burden on global health, owing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a fully functional immune system is essential for the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, the underlying mechanisms and reasons for failure in part of the infected population remain enigmatic. Here, whole-blood microarray gene expression analyses were performed in TB patients and in latently as well as uninfected healthy controls to define biomarkers predictive of susceptibility and resistance. Fc gamma receptor 1B (FCGRIB)was identified as the most differentially expressed gene, and, in combination with four other markers, produced a high degree of accuracy in discriminating TB patients and latently infected donors. We determined differentially expressed genes unique for active disease and identified profiles that correlated with susceptibility and resistance to TB. Elevated expression of innate immune-related genes in active TB and higher expression of particular gene clusters involved in apoptosis and natural killer cell activity in latently infected donors are likely to be the major distinctive factors determining failure or success in controlling M. tuberculosis infection. The gene expression profiles defined in this study provide valuable clues for better understanding of progression from latent infection to active disease and pave the way for defining predictive correlates of protection in TB.

  • 4. Parmar, A S
    et al.
    Lappalainen, M
    Paavola-Sakki, P
    Halme, L
    Färkkilä, M
    Turunen, U
    Kontula, K
    Aromaa, A
    Salomaa, V
    Peltonen, L
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Törkvist, L
    D'Amato, M
    Saavalainen, P
    Einarsdottir, E
    Association of celiac disease genes with inflammatory bowel disease in Finnish and Swedish patients2012In: Genes and Immunity, ISSN 1466-4879, E-ISSN 1476-5470, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 474-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some genetic loci may affect susceptibility to multiple immune system-related diseases. In the current study, we investigated whether the known susceptibility loci for celiac disease (CelD) also associate with Crohn's disease (CD) and/or ulcerative colitis (UC), the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in Finnish patients. A total of 45 genetic markers were genotyped in a Finnish data set comprising 699 IBD patients and 2482 controls. Single-marker association with IBD and its subphenotypes was tested. A meta-analysis with a Swedish UC data set was also performed. A total of 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with CD and/or UC (P<0.05). In the subphenotype analysis, rs6974491-ELMO1 (P=0.0002, odds ratio (OR): 2.20) and rs2298428-UBE2L3 (P=5.44 × 10(-5), OR: 2.59) associated with pediatric UC and CD, respectively. In the meta-analysis, rs4819388-ICOSLG (P=0.00042, OR: 0.79) associated with UC. In the subphenotype meta-analysis, rs1738074-TAGAP (P=7.40 × 10(-5), OR: 0.61), rs6974491-ELMO1 (P=0.00052, OR: 1.73) and rs4819388-ICOSLG (P=0.00019, OR: 0.75) associated with familial UC, pediatric UC and sporadic UC, respectively. Multiple CelD risk loci also confer susceptibility for CD and/or UC in the Finnish and Swedish populations. Certain genetic risk variants may furthermore predispose an individual for developing a particular disease phenotype.

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