oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carrique-Mas, J.J.
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institiute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna.
    Hökeberg, I.
    Gävleborg County Office for Infectious Disease Control, Landstinget Gävleborg, Gävle; Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Andersson, Yvonne
    Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institiute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna.
    Arneborn, Malin
    Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institiute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Osterman, B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Leffler, My
    Section of Veterinary Service and Food Control, Gävleborg Administrative Board, Gävle.
    Steen, M.
    Section of Veterinary Service and Food Control, Gävleborg Administrative Board, Gävle.
    Eriksson, E.
    Department of Bacteriology, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala.
    Hedin, G.
    Gävleborg County Office for Infectious Disease Control, Landstinget Gävleborg, Gävle; Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Giesecke, J.
    Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institiute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna.
    Febrile gastroenteritis after eating on-farm manufactured fresh cheese: an outbreak of listeriosis?2003In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 130, p. 79-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lopez-Valladares, Gloria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Parihar, Vishal Singh
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Restaurant and Culinary Arts, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    Helmersson, Seved
    Department of Environmental Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Birgitta
    Department of Bacteriology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sofie
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Christina
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Ringberg, Håkan
    Regional Centre for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Malmö, Sweden.
    Tjernberg, Ingela
    Department of Bacteriology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Henriques-Normark, Birgitta
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Human isolates of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden during half a century (1958-2010)2014In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, p. 2251-2260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes (n=932) isolated in Sweden during 1958–2010 from human patients with invasive listeriosis were characterized by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (AscI). Of the 932 isolates, 183 different PFGE types were identified, of which 83 were each represented by only one isolate. In all, 483 serovar 1/2a isolates were distributed over 114 PFGE types; 90 serovar 1/2b isolates gave 32 PFGE types; 21 serovar 1/2c isolates gave nine PFGE types; three serovar 3b isolates gave one PFGE type; and, 335 serovar 4b isolates gave 31 PFGE types. During the 1980s in Sweden, several serovar 4b cases were associated with the consumption of European raw soft cheese. However, as cheese-production hygiene has improved, the number of 4b cases has decreased. Since 1996, serovar 1/2a has been the dominant L. monocytogenes serovar in human listeriosis in Sweden. Therefore, based on current serovars and PFGE types, an association between human cases of listeriosis and the consumption of vacuum-packed gravad and cold-smoked salmon is suggested.

  • 3.
    Röckert Tjernberg, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Paediatrics, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bonnedahl, J.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden; Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Inghammar, M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Section for Infection Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Egesten, A.
    Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Clinical sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kahlmeter, G.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Naucler, P.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine Solna, Infectious Diseases Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriques-Normark, B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, City Hospital, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK .
    Coeliac disease and invasive pneumococcal disease: a population-based cohort study2017In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 145, no 6, p. 1203-1209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe infections are recognized complications of coeliac disease (CD). In the present study we aimed to examine whether individuals with CD are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). To do so, we performed a population-based cohort study including 29 012 individuals with biopsy-proven CD identified through biopsy reports from all pathology departments in Sweden. Each individual with CD was matched with up to five controls (n = 144 257). IPD events were identified through regional and national microbiological databases, including the National Surveillance System for Infectious Diseases. We used Cox regression analyses to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for diagnosed IPD. A total of 207 individuals had a record of IPD whereas 45/29 012 had CD (0.15%) and 162/144 257 were controls (0.11%). This corresponded to a 46% increased risk for IPD [HR 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-2.03]. The risk estimate was similar after adjustment for socioeconomic status, educational level and comorbidities, but then failed to attain statistical significance (adjusted HR 1.40, 95% CI 0.99-1.97). Nonetheless, our study shows a trend towards an increased risk for IPD in CD patients. The findings support results seen in earlier research and taking that into consideration individuals with CD may be considered for pneumococcal vaccination.

  • 4.
    Spiteri, G.
    et al.
    European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mårdh, O.
    European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Amato-Gauci, A. J.
    European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The resurgence of syphilis in high-income countries in the 2000s: a focus on Europe2019In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 147, article id UNSP e143Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Syphilis can cause severe complications and sequelae. Following a decrease in reported cases in European Union/ European Economic Area (EU/ EEA) and other high-income countries in the 1980s and 1990s as a result of the HIV epidemic and ensuing changes in sexual behaviour, trends started to increase in the 2000s in a number of EU/ EEA Member States with higher rates among men and a large proportion of cases reported among men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly HIV-positive MSM. Trends in EU/ EEA Member States vary however with some countries continuing to report decreases in the number of reported cases (mostly in the Eastern part of EU/ EEA) whereas many Western European countries report increasing numbers of cases. Increasing rates among women, although still relatively low, have been observed in a number of countries leading to concerns around mother-to-child transmission of syphilis and congenital syphilis. Similar overall trends are observed in other high-income countries with the exception of Japan where rates among heterosexual men and women have been rising at alarming levels. Control of syphilis requires use of comprehensive, evidence-based strategies which take into account lessons learned from previous control efforts as well as consideration of biomedical interventions.

  • 5.
    Säll, Olof
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Stenmark, Bianca
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Glimåker, Martin
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mölling, Paula
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Olcén, Per Olof
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Clinical presentation of invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y in Sweden, 1995 to 20122017In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 145, no 10, p. 2137-2143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the period 1995-2012, the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y (NmY) increased significantly in Sweden. This is mainly due to the emergence of a predominant cluster named strain type YI subtype 1, belonging to the ST-23 clonal complex (cc). The aim of this study was to examine the clinical picture of patients with invasive disease caused by NmY and to analyse whether the predominant cluster exhibits certain clinical characteristics that might explain the increased incidence. In this retrospective observational study, the medical records available from patients with IMD caused by Nm serogroup Y in Sweden between 1995 and 2012 were systematically reviewed. Patient characteristics, in-hospital findings and outcome were studied and differences between the dominating cluster and other isolates were analysed. Medical records from 175 of 191 patients were retrieved. The median age was 62 years. The all-cause mortality within 30 days of admission was 9% (15/175) in the whole material; 4% (2/54) in the cohort with strain type YI subtype 1 and 11% (12/121) among patients with other isolates. Thirty-three per cent of the patients were diagnosed with meningitis, 19% with pneumonia, 10% with arthritis and 35% were found to have bacteraemia but no apparent organ manifestation. This survey included cases with an aggressive clinical course as well as cases with a relatively mild clinical presentation. There was a trend towards lower mortality and less-severe disease in the cohort with strain type YI subtype 1 compared with the group with other isolates.

  • 6.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aldén, J.
    Communicable Disease Control Unit, Falun, Sweden .
    Ericsson, Henrik
    Department of Food Hygiene, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Helmersson, Seved
    Department of Food Hygiene, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Malmodin, B.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, County Hospital Falun, Falun, Sweden .
    Nyberg, O.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, County Hospital Falun, Falun, Sweden .
    Pettersson, A.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, County Hospital Falun, Falun, Sweden .
    Unnerstad, Helle
    Department of Food Hygiene, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A listeriosis patient infected with two different Listeria monocytogenes strains2002In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 105-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normally, only one isolate of Listeria monocytogenes from a case of listeriosis is subjected to characterization. Here we show that two isolates from different sites of the body were not the same strain. Such a phenomenon may not have any clinical relevance, although it may confuse the epidemiologist trying to match infection source with infection target.

  • 7.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hajdu, Lajos
    Computer Department, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bacteriological quality of on-farm manufactured goat cheese1990In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 104, p. 87-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Lopez-Valladares, Gloria
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Helmersson, S.
    Österlund, A.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    More than one variant of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from each of two human cases of invasive listeriosis2007In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 135, no 5, p. 854-856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two variants of Listeria monocytogenes were isolated from blood cultures from each of two patients with listeriosis. Each variant displayed a two-band difference in DNA profile from the other by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Although this difference in profile is insufficient to distinguish clearly between the variants, the possibility of co-infection with different strains of L. monocytogenes needs to be considered. We suggest that more than one colony should be selected for molecular typing to aid interpretation during investigation of the sources and routes of Listeria infection.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf